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Title: Solar heat receiver

Abstract

A receiver is described for converting solar energy to heat a gas to temperatures from 700 to 900/sup 0/C. The receiver is formed to minimize impingement of radiation on the walls and to provide maximum heating at and near the entry of the gas exit. Also, the receiver is formed to provide controlled movement of the gas to be heated to minimize wall temperatures. The receiver is designed for use with gas containing fine heat absorbing particles, such as carbon particles.

Inventors:
; ;
Publication Date:
OSTI Identifier:
5717786
Application Number:
ON: DE83018038
Assignee:
ERA-08-053826; EDB-83-175837
DOE Contract Number:
W-7405-ENG-48
Resource Type:
Patent
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
14 SOLAR ENERGY; SOLAR RECEIVERS; DESIGN; CARBON; GASES; MIXTURES; PARTICLES; SUSPENSIONS; DISPERSIONS; ELEMENTS; FLUIDS; NONMETALS; 141000* - Solar Collectors & Concentrators; 140700 - Solar Thermal Power Systems

Citation Formats

Hunt, A.J., Hansen, L.J., and Evans, D.B. Solar heat receiver. United States: N. p., 1982. Web.
Hunt, A.J., Hansen, L.J., & Evans, D.B. Solar heat receiver. United States.
Hunt, A.J., Hansen, L.J., and Evans, D.B. 1982. "Solar heat receiver". United States. doi:.
@article{osti_5717786,
title = {Solar heat receiver},
author = {Hunt, A.J. and Hansen, L.J. and Evans, D.B.},
abstractNote = {A receiver is described for converting solar energy to heat a gas to temperatures from 700 to 900/sup 0/C. The receiver is formed to minimize impingement of radiation on the walls and to provide maximum heating at and near the entry of the gas exit. Also, the receiver is formed to provide controlled movement of the gas to be heated to minimize wall temperatures. The receiver is designed for use with gas containing fine heat absorbing particles, such as carbon particles.},
doi = {},
journal = {},
number = ,
volume = ,
place = {United States},
year = 1982,
month = 9
}
  • A receiver for converting solar energy to heat a gas to temperatures from 700.degree.-900.degree. C. The receiver is formed to minimize impingement of radiation on the walls and to provide maximum heating at and near the entry of the gas exit. Also, the receiver is formed to provide controlled movement of the gas to be heated to minimize wall temperatures. The receiver is designed for use with gas containing fine heat absorbing particles, such as carbon particles.
  • A power plant includes a solar receiver heating solid particles, a standpipe receiving solid particles from the solar receiver, a pressurized heat exchanger heating working fluid by heat transfer through direct contact with heated solid particles flowing out of the bottom of the standpipe, and a flow path for solid particles from the bottom of the standpipe into the pressurized heat exchanger that is sealed by a pressure P produced at the bottom of the standpipe by a column of heated solid particles of height H. The flow path may include a silo or surge tank comprising a pressure vesselmore » connected to the bottom of the standpipe, and a non-mechanical valve. The power plant may further include a turbine driven by heated working fluid discharged from the pressurized heat exchanger, and a compressor driven by the turbine.« less
  • A receiver for converting solar energy to heat a gas to temperatures from 700/sup 0/-900/sup 0/ C is disclosed. The receiver is formed to minimize impingement of radiation on the walls and to provide maximum heating at and near the entry of the gas exit. Also, the receiver is formed to provide controlled movement of the gas to be heated to minimize wall temperatures. The receiver is designed for use with gas containing fine heat absorbing particles, such as carbon particles.
  • A solar converter is disclosed which has particular applicability at the focal point of a parabolic concentrator. The converter absorbs solar thermal radiation in a cavity type receiver and transports the heat via a secondary fluid to a heat exchanger which contains a primary (I.E., working) fluid used for process heating or to power a heat engine employing either stirling, rankine, or brayton thermodynamic cycles. The secondary fluid is boiled within the receiver by the trapped solar radiation and the released vapor rises along an elevated path to the heat exchanger. The vapor condenses on the surfaces of the heatmore » exchanger, thereby transferring heat to the engine working fluid. The condensed liquid then flows by means of gravity back to the solar receiver. The walls of the cavity receiver are typically comprised of two concentric cylinders joined at one end in a half toroid and at the other end in concentric half spheres. Optimum primary and secondary fluids, which may be different from each other and are different for different applications, are described.« less