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Title: Creosote accumulation as a function of moisture content, wood species, and fire intensity in an airtight stove, and chimney fire experiments

Abstract

Two basic aspects of creosote investigated were: creosote accumulation as a function of moisture content, wood species, and stove power output; and creosote combustion - that is, chimney fires. For the creosote accumulation studies, six identical stove systems were operated simultaneously for four months, during which power output, fuel species and fuel moisture content were systematically varied. Chimneys were weighed before and after each test series to determine creosote accumulation. For the simulated fireplace series, where the stove doors were left wide open, the conventional wisdom holds true - creosote accumulation increased with increasing moisture content. For closed combustion systems (airtight stoves), however, green wood produced less creosote than dry or medium wood under medium and high power conditions. Under low power conditions there was no significant effect of moisture content on creosote accumulation. How an appliance is operated can have a larger effect on creosote than either the fuel species or moisture content; up to 48 times more creosote was observed with a smoldering fire than a brightly burning fire. The chimney fires, induced in heavily creosoted chimneys in the laboratory, resulted in a maximum flue gas temperature of 1125/sup 0/C, as measured with unshielded thermocouples. The creosote firesmore » typically lasted 3 to 15 minutes. Noncreosote chimney fires were also observed.« less

Authors:
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Solar Energy Research Inst., Golden, CO (USA)
OSTI Identifier:
5695219
Report Number(s):
SERI/TR-00192-1
ON: DE82006018
DOE Contract Number:  
AC02-77CH00178
Resource Type:
Technical Report
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
32 ENERGY CONSERVATION, CONSUMPTION, AND UTILIZATION; CREOSOTE; BUILDUP; COMBUSTION; STOVES; OPERATION; DATA; DRAFT CONTROL SYSTEMS; FLUE GAS; MOISTURE; POWER; STACK DISPOSAL; STACKS; TEMPERATURE MEASUREMENT; WOOD BURNING APPLIANCES; WOOD FUELS; APPLIANCES; CHEMICAL REACTIONS; CONTROL EQUIPMENT; ENERGY SOURCES; EQUIPMENT; FLOW REGULATORS; FUELS; GASEOUS WASTES; INFORMATION; MANAGEMENT; OXIDATION; THERMOCHEMICAL PROCESSES; WASTE DISPOSAL; WASTE MANAGEMENT; WASTES; 320100* - Energy Conservation, Consumption, & Utilization- Buildings

Citation Formats

Shelton, J W. Creosote accumulation as a function of moisture content, wood species, and fire intensity in an airtight stove, and chimney fire experiments. United States: N. p., 1981. Web.
Shelton, J W. Creosote accumulation as a function of moisture content, wood species, and fire intensity in an airtight stove, and chimney fire experiments. United States.
Shelton, J W. Sun . "Creosote accumulation as a function of moisture content, wood species, and fire intensity in an airtight stove, and chimney fire experiments". United States.
@article{osti_5695219,
title = {Creosote accumulation as a function of moisture content, wood species, and fire intensity in an airtight stove, and chimney fire experiments},
author = {Shelton, J W},
abstractNote = {Two basic aspects of creosote investigated were: creosote accumulation as a function of moisture content, wood species, and stove power output; and creosote combustion - that is, chimney fires. For the creosote accumulation studies, six identical stove systems were operated simultaneously for four months, during which power output, fuel species and fuel moisture content were systematically varied. Chimneys were weighed before and after each test series to determine creosote accumulation. For the simulated fireplace series, where the stove doors were left wide open, the conventional wisdom holds true - creosote accumulation increased with increasing moisture content. For closed combustion systems (airtight stoves), however, green wood produced less creosote than dry or medium wood under medium and high power conditions. Under low power conditions there was no significant effect of moisture content on creosote accumulation. How an appliance is operated can have a larger effect on creosote than either the fuel species or moisture content; up to 48 times more creosote was observed with a smoldering fire than a brightly burning fire. The chimney fires, induced in heavily creosoted chimneys in the laboratory, resulted in a maximum flue gas temperature of 1125/sup 0/C, as measured with unshielded thermocouples. The creosote fires typically lasted 3 to 15 minutes. Noncreosote chimney fires were also observed.},
doi = {},
journal = {},
number = ,
volume = ,
place = {United States},
year = {1981},
month = {11}
}

Technical Report:
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