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Title: An overview of carbon monoxide generation and release by home appliances

Abstract

Carbon monoxide (CO) is an odorless, colorless and tasteless gas which is highly toxic and can be produced by many combustion sources commonly found within homes. Potential sources include boilers and furnaces, water heaters, space heaters, stoves, ovens, clothes dryers, wood stoves, fireplaces, charcoal grilles, automobiles, cigarettes, oil lamps, and candles. Any fuel that contains carbon can form CO including, natural gas, propane, kerosene, fuel oil, wood, and coal. Exposure to elevated CO levels typically requires its production by a combustion source and its release into the home through a venting system malfunction. The health effects of CO range from headaches and flue-like symptoms to loss of concentration, coma and death depending on the concentration of CO and the exposure time. At levels of only 1%, which is the order of magnitude produced by automobile exhaust, carbon monoxide can cause death in less than 3 minutes. While most combustion equipment operate with low CO levels, many operating factors can contribute to elevated CO levels in the home including: burner adjustment, combustion air supply, house air-tightness, exhaust fan operation, cracked heat exchangers, vent blockages, and flue pipe damage. Test data on CO emissions is presented from a wide range of sourcesmore » including Brookhaven National Laboratory, Gas Research Institute, American Gas Association, the US Environmental Protection Agency, and the US Consumer Product Safety Commission for many potential CO sources in and near the home.« less

Authors:
 [1]
  1. Energy Research Center, Inc., Easton, CT (United States)
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Brookhaven National Lab., Upton, NY (United States)
OSTI Identifier:
569154
Report Number(s):
BNL-52537; CONF-9704179-
ON: DE98001121; TRN: 98:000720-0013
Resource Type:
Conference
Resource Relation:
Conference: 1997 oil heat technology conference and workshop, Upton, NY (United States), 3-4 Apr 1997; Other Information: PBD: Sep 1997; Related Information: Is Part Of Proceedings of the 1997 oil heat technology conference and workshop; McDonald, R.J.; PB: 200 p.
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
02 PETROLEUM; 32 ENERGY CONSERVATION, CONSUMPTION, AND UTILIZATION; APPLIANCES; CARBON MONOXIDE; CLOTHES DRYERS; COMBUSTION PRODUCTS; FIREPLACES; FURNACES; HEAT EXCHANGERS; KEROSENE; OVENS; SAFETY; SPACE HEATERS; WATER HEATERS; HEALTH HAZARDS; FUEL OILS

Citation Formats

Batey, J. An overview of carbon monoxide generation and release by home appliances. United States: N. p., 1997. Web.
Batey, J. An overview of carbon monoxide generation and release by home appliances. United States.
Batey, J. Mon . "An overview of carbon monoxide generation and release by home appliances". United States. https://www.osti.gov/servlets/purl/569154.
@article{osti_569154,
title = {An overview of carbon monoxide generation and release by home appliances},
author = {Batey, J},
abstractNote = {Carbon monoxide (CO) is an odorless, colorless and tasteless gas which is highly toxic and can be produced by many combustion sources commonly found within homes. Potential sources include boilers and furnaces, water heaters, space heaters, stoves, ovens, clothes dryers, wood stoves, fireplaces, charcoal grilles, automobiles, cigarettes, oil lamps, and candles. Any fuel that contains carbon can form CO including, natural gas, propane, kerosene, fuel oil, wood, and coal. Exposure to elevated CO levels typically requires its production by a combustion source and its release into the home through a venting system malfunction. The health effects of CO range from headaches and flue-like symptoms to loss of concentration, coma and death depending on the concentration of CO and the exposure time. At levels of only 1%, which is the order of magnitude produced by automobile exhaust, carbon monoxide can cause death in less than 3 minutes. While most combustion equipment operate with low CO levels, many operating factors can contribute to elevated CO levels in the home including: burner adjustment, combustion air supply, house air-tightness, exhaust fan operation, cracked heat exchangers, vent blockages, and flue pipe damage. Test data on CO emissions is presented from a wide range of sources including Brookhaven National Laboratory, Gas Research Institute, American Gas Association, the US Environmental Protection Agency, and the US Consumer Product Safety Commission for many potential CO sources in and near the home.},
doi = {},
journal = {},
number = ,
volume = ,
place = {United States},
year = {1997},
month = {9}
}

Conference:
Other availability
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