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Title: Mitigation planning for raptors during mining

Abstract

Birds of prey and their eggs, young and nests are protected by state and federal laws and regulations. Surface mining operators may experience conflicts with raptors when expanding into nesting areas or when raptors are attracted into mining areas. State and federal permits are required for disturbance or manipulation of birds of prey. Mitigation planning for raptors begins before mining and continues through mining. As conflict situations changes, so must the mitigation plan. Before each nesting season the mining schedule should be compared to areas of known raptor nesting activity. If overlap occurs, nest protection measures may be needed. Areas of potential conflict should be patrolled regularly to identify the presence of a raptor pair and nest starts. Should a raptor nest be built and eggs laid, a change in the mining schedule or an egg or brood manipulation may resolve the conflict. Bridger Coal Company has successfully mitigated conflicts with 3 raptor species. A ferruginous hawk (Buteo regalis) nest with brood was successfully relocated across a pit. Red-tailed hawk (B. jamaicensis) egg clutches were removed from 2 highwall nests and transported in a portable incubator to a commercial raptor propagator where they were hatched, fed and conspecifically imprinted untilmore » achieving self-thermoregulation. All chicks were returned to the mine and successfully placed into foster nests. A metal artificial nest ledge for a prairie falcon (Falco mexicanus) was constructed in a cliff and a traditional nesting ledge rendered inaccessible. The falcon pair successfully nested in the artificial ledge.« less

Authors:
 [1];  [2]
  1. Wyoming Dept. of Environmental Quality/Land Quality Division, Lander, WY (United States)
  2. Bridger Coal Co., Rock Springs, WY (United States)
Publication Date:
OSTI Identifier:
56913
Report Number(s):
CONF-9003298-
TRN: 95:000425-0005
Resource Type:
Conference
Resource Relation:
Conference: 5. Billings symposium on disturbed land rehabilitation, Billings, MT (United States), 25-30 Mar 1990; Other Information: PBD: 1990; Related Information: Is Part Of Fifth Billings symposium on disturbed land rehabilitation. Volume II: Hazardous waste management; wildlife; hydrology, drainages, erosion and wetlands; soils, minesoils and overburden; linear disturbances; oil and gas; PB: 397 p.
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
01 COAL, LIGNITE, AND PEAT; 55 BIOLOGY AND MEDICINE, BASIC STUDIES; BIRDS; HABITAT; ANIMAL BREEDING; COAL MINES; ENVIRONMENTAL EFFECTS; LAND USE; EGGS; NESTS; SURFACE MINING

Citation Formats

Platt, S.W., and Hargis, N.E. Mitigation planning for raptors during mining. United States: N. p., 1990. Web.
Platt, S.W., & Hargis, N.E. Mitigation planning for raptors during mining. United States.
Platt, S.W., and Hargis, N.E. 1990. "Mitigation planning for raptors during mining". United States. doi:.
@article{osti_56913,
title = {Mitigation planning for raptors during mining},
author = {Platt, S.W. and Hargis, N.E.},
abstractNote = {Birds of prey and their eggs, young and nests are protected by state and federal laws and regulations. Surface mining operators may experience conflicts with raptors when expanding into nesting areas or when raptors are attracted into mining areas. State and federal permits are required for disturbance or manipulation of birds of prey. Mitigation planning for raptors begins before mining and continues through mining. As conflict situations changes, so must the mitigation plan. Before each nesting season the mining schedule should be compared to areas of known raptor nesting activity. If overlap occurs, nest protection measures may be needed. Areas of potential conflict should be patrolled regularly to identify the presence of a raptor pair and nest starts. Should a raptor nest be built and eggs laid, a change in the mining schedule or an egg or brood manipulation may resolve the conflict. Bridger Coal Company has successfully mitigated conflicts with 3 raptor species. A ferruginous hawk (Buteo regalis) nest with brood was successfully relocated across a pit. Red-tailed hawk (B. jamaicensis) egg clutches were removed from 2 highwall nests and transported in a portable incubator to a commercial raptor propagator where they were hatched, fed and conspecifically imprinted until achieving self-thermoregulation. All chicks were returned to the mine and successfully placed into foster nests. A metal artificial nest ledge for a prairie falcon (Falco mexicanus) was constructed in a cliff and a traditional nesting ledge rendered inaccessible. The falcon pair successfully nested in the artificial ledge.},
doi = {},
journal = {},
number = ,
volume = ,
place = {United States},
year = 1990,
month =
}

Conference:
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