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Title: Determinants of polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) in the sera of mothers and children from Michigan farms with PCB-contaminated silos

Abstract

Blood samples were collected from 28 mothers and from 38 school-aged children from Michigan farms on which there were polychlorinated biphenyl (PCB)-contaminated silos. The samples were analyzed for PCBs and other contaminants, including polybrominated biphenyls (PBBs) and dichlorodiphenyl trichloroethane (p,p{prime}-DDT + p,p{prime}-DDE) via packed column gas chromatography. The PCBs were quantified, using the Webb-McCall method, with Aroclors 1016 and 1260 used as reference standards. Approximately 42% of the children had serum PCB levels above the detection limit of 3.0 ng/ml. The values ranged from 3.1 to 23.3 ng/ml, with a mean of 6.8 ng/ml. In contrast, PCBs were detected in 86% of the mothers. The mean serum concentration was somewhat higher for the mothers (9.6 ng/ml), but the range was similar to that found for the children. PBBs were not detected in any of the children, but were present in trace amounts in 25% of the mothers. Conversely, DDT was present in 66% of the children and 93% of the mothers. As with PCBs, DDT concentrations were somewhat higher in the mothers. DDE accounted for 89% of the total DDT in serum. Various potential sources of exposure were evaluated as possible determinants of serum PCB levels, using hierarchical multiple regression.more » Years of residence on a silo farm and consumption of PCB-contaminated Great Lakes fish both accounted for significant portions of the variance in maternal serum PCB levels. Exposure via breast-feeding explained a large and highly significant proportion of the variance in the children`s serum PCB concentrations, suggesting that breast milk was the primary source of PCB exposure for these children. Years of residence on a silo farm also explained a significant proportion of the variance in children`s serum PCBs. 29 refs., 1 fig., 5 tabs.« less

Authors:
 [1]; ;  [2]; ;  [3];  [4]
  1. Univ. of Illinois, Urbana, IL (United States)
  2. Wayne State Univ., Detroit, MI (United States)
  3. Michigan Dept. of Public Health, Lansing, MI (United States)
  4. Michigan State Univ., East Lansing, MI (United States)
Publication Date:
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE
OSTI Identifier:
56742
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Resource Relation:
Journal Name: Archives of Environmental Health; Journal Volume: 49; Journal Issue: 6; Other Information: PBD: Nov-Dec 1994
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
56 BIOLOGY AND MEDICINE, APPLIED STUDIES; 55 BIOLOGY AND MEDICINE, BASIC STUDIES; BLOOD SERUM; QUANTITATIVE CHEMICAL ANALYSIS; CHILDREN; ENVIRONMENTAL EXPOSURE PATHWAY; POLYCHLORINATED BIPHENYLS; BIOLOGICAL ACCUMULATION; WOMEN; GAS CHROMATOGRAPHY; MILK; DDT; FISHES; FOOD CHAINS

Citation Formats

Schantz, S.L., Jacobson, J.L., Jacobson, S.W., Humphrey, H.E.B., Welch, R., and Gasior, D.. Determinants of polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) in the sera of mothers and children from Michigan farms with PCB-contaminated silos. United States: N. p., 1994. Web. doi:10.1080/00039896.1994.9955000.
Schantz, S.L., Jacobson, J.L., Jacobson, S.W., Humphrey, H.E.B., Welch, R., & Gasior, D.. Determinants of polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) in the sera of mothers and children from Michigan farms with PCB-contaminated silos. United States. doi:10.1080/00039896.1994.9955000.
Schantz, S.L., Jacobson, J.L., Jacobson, S.W., Humphrey, H.E.B., Welch, R., and Gasior, D.. Tue . "Determinants of polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) in the sera of mothers and children from Michigan farms with PCB-contaminated silos". United States. doi:10.1080/00039896.1994.9955000.
@article{osti_56742,
title = {Determinants of polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) in the sera of mothers and children from Michigan farms with PCB-contaminated silos},
author = {Schantz, S.L. and Jacobson, J.L. and Jacobson, S.W. and Humphrey, H.E.B. and Welch, R. and Gasior, D.},
abstractNote = {Blood samples were collected from 28 mothers and from 38 school-aged children from Michigan farms on which there were polychlorinated biphenyl (PCB)-contaminated silos. The samples were analyzed for PCBs and other contaminants, including polybrominated biphenyls (PBBs) and dichlorodiphenyl trichloroethane (p,p{prime}-DDT + p,p{prime}-DDE) via packed column gas chromatography. The PCBs were quantified, using the Webb-McCall method, with Aroclors 1016 and 1260 used as reference standards. Approximately 42% of the children had serum PCB levels above the detection limit of 3.0 ng/ml. The values ranged from 3.1 to 23.3 ng/ml, with a mean of 6.8 ng/ml. In contrast, PCBs were detected in 86% of the mothers. The mean serum concentration was somewhat higher for the mothers (9.6 ng/ml), but the range was similar to that found for the children. PBBs were not detected in any of the children, but were present in trace amounts in 25% of the mothers. Conversely, DDT was present in 66% of the children and 93% of the mothers. As with PCBs, DDT concentrations were somewhat higher in the mothers. DDE accounted for 89% of the total DDT in serum. Various potential sources of exposure were evaluated as possible determinants of serum PCB levels, using hierarchical multiple regression. Years of residence on a silo farm and consumption of PCB-contaminated Great Lakes fish both accounted for significant portions of the variance in maternal serum PCB levels. Exposure via breast-feeding explained a large and highly significant proportion of the variance in the children`s serum PCB concentrations, suggesting that breast milk was the primary source of PCB exposure for these children. Years of residence on a silo farm also explained a significant proportion of the variance in children`s serum PCBs. 29 refs., 1 fig., 5 tabs.},
doi = {10.1080/00039896.1994.9955000},
journal = {Archives of Environmental Health},
number = 6,
volume = 49,
place = {United States},
year = {Tue Nov 01 00:00:00 EST 1994},
month = {Tue Nov 01 00:00:00 EST 1994}
}
  • Serum samples from 285 4-year-old Michigan children were evaluated for levels of 11 environmental contaminants. Polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) were found in half the samples tested; polybrominated biphenyls (PBBs) in 13-21 percent; dichlorodiphenyl trichloroethane (DDT), in more than 70 percent. Nursing (Mothers' milk) was the principal source of these exposures. Congener-specific analysis documented the presence of at least one highly toxic PCB congener, 2,3',4,4',5-pentachlorobiphenyl. The data demonstrate the multigenerational impact of female exposure to persistent organic environmental contaminants.
  • Serum samples from 285 4-year old Michigan children were evaluated for levels of 11 environmental contaminants. Polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) were found in half the samples tested; polybrominated biphenyls (PBBs) in 13-21%; dichlorodiphenyl trichloroethane (DDT), in more than 70%. Nursing (Mothers milk) was the principal source of these exposures. Congener-specific analysis documented the presence of at least one highly toxic PCB congener, 2,3',4,4',5-pentachlorobiphenyl. The data demonstrate the multigenerational impact of female exposure to persistent organic environmental contaminants.
  • Organochlorine pesticides and polychlorinated biphenyls (PCB) are persistent contaminants of the environment. Owing to their lipophilic properties they are primarily stored in fat-rich tissues and fluids of humans and animals. The results of a monitoring study on levels of the DDT-complex, HCH-group of isomers, hexachlorobenzene (HCB) and PCB in human milk and serum are presented in this paper. Samples were collected in the northern Adriatic area for which no data have so far been available. Sample donors were chosen from rural and small urban locations where mediterranean eating habits are still maintained. The previous studies were conducted in an industrializedmore » continental town of Croatia.« less
  • This report presents the results of a trial burn conducted at the Energy Systems Company (ENSCO) located in El Dorado, Arkansas in order to determine whether liquid PCBs and shredded electronic capacitors could be incinerated in accordance with the recent EPA rules and regulations published in the Federal Register (40 CFR Part 761, Vol. 44, No. 106, pp. 31513-31568, May 31, 1979). Based on the results of this trial burn, PCBs were not detected in the stack effluent, the scrubber liquor effluent, or the recycled scrubber liquor from the sludge lagoon. PCBs were detected in the ash effluent from themore » rotary kiln and were less than 550 ppM, the lower limit at which PCBs are regulated by the EPA. A discussion is given of problems associated with the EPA perchlorination procedure for analyzing PCBs.« less
  • Proposed legislation to strictly control the manufacturing, processing, distribution in commerce, and use of Polychlorinated Biphenyls (PCBs) included requirements for preparation of Exposure and Contamination Control (ECC) plans for PCB-related activities (40 CFR, Section 761.46, June 7, 1978). Just prior to the publication of this report, these requirements were modified in the final regulations, issued May 31, 1979, in the Federal Register. The requirement for Exposure and Contamination Control Plans was replaced by a Spill Prevention Control and Countermeasure (SPCC) Plan requirement under Section 311 of the Clean Water Act (40 CFR 112 and 43 FR 39276; September 1, 1978).more » Changes have been made in this report to reflect the most current (May 31, 1979) regulatory requirements. The purpose of Volumes II and III of this report is to provide electrical utilities with useful guidelines and examples for preparing SPCC plans. The PCB SPCC plan guidelines and forms provided in Volume II are used in Volume III to prepare a plan for the National Power and Light Company, a hypothetical electrical utility. A complete description of all PCB-related activities at the utility is included in order to demonstrate how spill preventative measures for specific facilities are incorporated into the plan document. The required SPCC plan is prepared, as well as four optional facility plans for one hydroelectric dam, two substations, and a PCB equipment area, where PCB equipment and/or activities were deemed to warrant special consideration.« less