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Title: Groundwater contamination

Abstract

The subject of these conference proceedings is the groundwater contamination. It is by nature multifarious - dealing with detection and monitoring, prevention, abatement and containment, and correction and restoration of contaminated groundwater - it intrinsically encompasses myriad disciplines, and it involves all levels of government. Also, the subject of groundwater contamination is complex because decisions concerning groundwater pollution control that are scientifically sound, technologically within the state of the art, economically feasible, politically tractable, legally sustainable, socially acceptable, morally accountable, and organizationally implementable must be grounded on appropriate information and intelligence bases in their respective areas - science, technology, economics, politics, the law, society, ethics, and management. Indeed, the human health effects (e.g., cancer, damage to the central nervous system, liver and kidney damage) and non-health effects (economic hardship to industry, agriculture, households, and municipalities; environmental impacts; social impacts) necessitate that we, as a society, address in a somber way the following variations of the same question: How safe is safe enough How clean is safe enough The enormous cost - in billions of dollars over the next decade - that various studies project for the prevention, detection and monitoring, abatement and containment, and correction and restoration of groundwater contaminationmore » make an answer to these questions even more urgent. There are sixteen papers in these proceedings.« less

Authors:
 [1]
  1. (Case Western Reserve Univ., Cleveland, OH (USA). Dept. of Systems Engineering)
Publication Date:
OSTI Identifier:
5650185
Report Number(s):
CONF-841141--
ISBN: 0-939204-31-2
Resource Type:
Conference
Resource Relation:
Conference: Groundwater contamination conference, Santa Barbara, CA (USA), 11-16 Nov 1984
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
54 ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCES; 29 ENERGY PLANNING, POLICY AND ECONOMY; GROUND WATER; WATER POLLUTION ABATEMENT; WATER POLLUTION; HEALTH HAZARDS; CONTAMINATION; ECONOMICS; ENVIRONMENTAL IMPACTS; LAWS; PROCEEDINGS; REMEDIAL ACTION; WATER POLLUTION CONTROL; CONTROL; DOCUMENT TYPES; HAZARDS; HYDROGEN COMPOUNDS; OXYGEN COMPOUNDS; POLLUTION; POLLUTION ABATEMENT; POLLUTION CONTROL; WATER 520200* -- Environment, Aquatic-- Chemicals Monitoring & Transport-- (-1989); 290300 -- Energy Planning & Policy-- Environment, Health, & Safety

Citation Formats

Haimes, Y. Groundwater contamination. United States: N. p., 1986. Web.
Haimes, Y. Groundwater contamination. United States.
Haimes, Y. 1986. "Groundwater contamination". United States. doi:.
@article{osti_5650185,
title = {Groundwater contamination},
author = {Haimes, Y.},
abstractNote = {The subject of these conference proceedings is the groundwater contamination. It is by nature multifarious - dealing with detection and monitoring, prevention, abatement and containment, and correction and restoration of contaminated groundwater - it intrinsically encompasses myriad disciplines, and it involves all levels of government. Also, the subject of groundwater contamination is complex because decisions concerning groundwater pollution control that are scientifically sound, technologically within the state of the art, economically feasible, politically tractable, legally sustainable, socially acceptable, morally accountable, and organizationally implementable must be grounded on appropriate information and intelligence bases in their respective areas - science, technology, economics, politics, the law, society, ethics, and management. Indeed, the human health effects (e.g., cancer, damage to the central nervous system, liver and kidney damage) and non-health effects (economic hardship to industry, agriculture, households, and municipalities; environmental impacts; social impacts) necessitate that we, as a society, address in a somber way the following variations of the same question: How safe is safe enough How clean is safe enough The enormous cost - in billions of dollars over the next decade - that various studies project for the prevention, detection and monitoring, abatement and containment, and correction and restoration of groundwater contamination make an answer to these questions even more urgent. There are sixteen papers in these proceedings.},
doi = {},
journal = {},
number = ,
volume = ,
place = {United States},
year = 1986,
month = 1
}

Conference:
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  • Some early regional studies in the southern San Francisco Bay Area applied the term older bay mud' to Wisconsin and older deposits thought to be estuarine in origin. This outdated interpretation has apparently contributed to an expectation of laterally-continuous aquifers and aquitards. In fact, heterogeneous alluvial deposits often create complex hydrogeologic settings that defy simple remedial approaches. A more useful stratigraphic model provides a foundation for conducting site investigations and assessing the feasibility of remediation. A synthesis of recent regional studies and drilling results at one site on the southwest margin of the Bay indicate that the upper quaternary stratigraphymore » consists of four primary units in the upper 200 feet of sediments (oldest to youngest): (1) Illinoian glacial-age alluvium (an important groundwater source); (2) Sangamon interglacial-age deposits, which include fine-grained alluvial deposits and estuarine deposits equivalent to the Yerba Buena Mud (a regional confining layer); (3) Wisconsin glacial-age alluvial fan and floodplain deposits; and (4) Holocene interglacial-age sediments, which include fine-grained alluvial and estuarine deposits equivalent to the younger bay mud'. Remedial investigations generally focus on groundwater contamination in the Wisconsin and Holocene alluvial deposits. Detailed drilling results indicate that narrow sand and gravel channels occur in anastomosing patterns within a Wisconsin to Holocene floodplain sequence dominated by interchannel silts and clays. The identification of these small-scale high-permeability conduits is critical to understanding and predicting contaminant transport on a local scale. Discontinuous site-specific aquitards do not provide competent separation where stacked channels occur and the correlation of aquitards over even small distance is often tenuous at best.« less
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  • The Illinois State Water Survey and the Illinois State Geological Survey, parts of the Illinois Department of Energy and Natural Resources, as part of the mandates of the Illinois Groundwater Protection Act, undertook a project to determine the potential for vulnerability to contamination by agricultural chemicals in private domestic wells throughout the State. GIS techniques were heavily relied upon to establish four categories of potential vulnerability to such contamination. Information from several sources, Federal, State and Local, were used to develop the coverages which were finally overlain to create the map. Criteria for the evaluation of the potential for vulnerabilitymore » included location with respect to agricultural chemical application, storage, and preparation, urban vs. rural setting land use, depth below surface to aquifer materials, and soils information. Illinois has more in-depth information on these kinds of information than many of the States, and still there were problems in accumulating the needed data. These included, lack of availability, poor documentation of data collection and storage protocols, and the lack of adequate detail within datasets. Supplementation of information before the application of GIS techniques was needed.« less