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Title: Xanthophylls and abscisic acid biosynthesis in water-stressed bean leaves

Abstract

Experiments were designed to obtain evidence about the possible role of xanthophylls as abscisic acid (ABA) precursors in water-stressed leaves of Phaseolus vularis L. Leaves were exposed to /sup 14/CO/sub 2/ and the specific activities of several major leaf xanthophylls and stress-induced ABA were determined after a chase in /sup 12/CO/sub 2/ for varying periods of time. The ABA specific radioactivities were about 30 to 70% of that of lutein and violaxanthin regardless of the chase period. The specific activity of neoxanthin, however, was only about 15% of that of ABA. The effects of fluridone on xanthophyll and ABA levels and the extent of labeling of both from /sup 14/CO/sub 2/ were determined. Fluridone did not inhibit the accumulation of ABA when leaves were stressed once, although subsequent stresses in the presence of fluridone did lead to a reduced ABA accumulation. The incorporation of /sup 14/C from /sup 14/CO/sub 2/ into ABA and the xanthophylls was inhibited by fluridone and to about the same extent. The incorporation of /sup 18/O into ABA from violaxanthin which had been labeled in situ by means of the violaxanthin cycle was measured. The results indicated that a portion of the ABA accumulated during stressmore » was formed from violaxanthin which had been labeled with /sup 18/O. The results of these experiments are consistent with a preformed xanthophyll(s) as the major ABA precursor in water-stressed bean leaves.« less

Authors:
;
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
State Univ. of New York, Syracuse
OSTI Identifier:
5640424
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Resource Relation:
Journal Name: Plant Physiol.; (United States); Journal Volume: 85:4
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
59 BASIC BIOLOGICAL SCIENCES; ABSCISIC ACID; BIOSYNTHESIS; PHASEOLUS; BIOLOGICAL STRESS; PIGMENTS; CARBON 14 COMPOUNDS; CARBON DIOXIDE; LEAVES; OXYGEN 18; PRECURSOR; RESPONSE MODIFYING FACTORS; TRACER TECHNIQUES; WATER; AUXINS; BACTERIA; CARBON COMPOUNDS; CARBON OXIDES; CARBOXYLIC ACIDS; CHALCOGENIDES; EVEN-EVEN NUCLEI; HYDROGEN COMPOUNDS; ISOTOPE APPLICATIONS; ISOTOPES; LABELLED COMPOUNDS; LEGUMINOSAE; LIGHT NUCLEI; MICROORGANISMS; MONOCARBOXYLIC ACIDS; NUCLEI; ORGANIC ACIDS; ORGANIC COMPOUNDS; OXIDES; OXYGEN COMPOUNDS; OXYGEN ISOTOPES; PLANT GROWTH REGULATORS; PLANTS; RHIZOBIUM; STABLE ISOTOPES; SYNTHESIS; 550201* - Biochemistry- Tracer Techniques

Citation Formats

Li, Y., and Walton, D.C.. Xanthophylls and abscisic acid biosynthesis in water-stressed bean leaves. United States: N. p., 1987. Web. doi:10.1104/pp.85.4.910.
Li, Y., & Walton, D.C.. Xanthophylls and abscisic acid biosynthesis in water-stressed bean leaves. United States. doi:10.1104/pp.85.4.910.
Li, Y., and Walton, D.C.. 1987. "Xanthophylls and abscisic acid biosynthesis in water-stressed bean leaves". United States. doi:10.1104/pp.85.4.910.
@article{osti_5640424,
title = {Xanthophylls and abscisic acid biosynthesis in water-stressed bean leaves},
author = {Li, Y. and Walton, D.C.},
abstractNote = {Experiments were designed to obtain evidence about the possible role of xanthophylls as abscisic acid (ABA) precursors in water-stressed leaves of Phaseolus vularis L. Leaves were exposed to /sup 14/CO/sub 2/ and the specific activities of several major leaf xanthophylls and stress-induced ABA were determined after a chase in /sup 12/CO/sub 2/ for varying periods of time. The ABA specific radioactivities were about 30 to 70% of that of lutein and violaxanthin regardless of the chase period. The specific activity of neoxanthin, however, was only about 15% of that of ABA. The effects of fluridone on xanthophyll and ABA levels and the extent of labeling of both from /sup 14/CO/sub 2/ were determined. Fluridone did not inhibit the accumulation of ABA when leaves were stressed once, although subsequent stresses in the presence of fluridone did lead to a reduced ABA accumulation. The incorporation of /sup 14/C from /sup 14/CO/sub 2/ into ABA and the xanthophylls was inhibited by fluridone and to about the same extent. The incorporation of /sup 18/O into ABA from violaxanthin which had been labeled in situ by means of the violaxanthin cycle was measured. The results indicated that a portion of the ABA accumulated during stress was formed from violaxanthin which had been labeled with /sup 18/O. The results of these experiments are consistent with a preformed xanthophyll(s) as the major ABA precursor in water-stressed bean leaves.},
doi = {10.1104/pp.85.4.910},
journal = {Plant Physiol.; (United States)},
number = ,
volume = 85:4,
place = {United States},
year = 1987,
month =
}
  • The leaves a dark-grown bean (Phaseolus vulgaris L.) seedlings accumulate considerably lower quantities of xanthophylls and carotenes than do leaves of light-grown seedlings, but they synthesize at least comparable amounts of abscisic acid (ABA) and its metabolites when water stressed. We observed a 1:1 relationship on a molar basis between the reduction in levels of ciolaxanthin, 9{prime}-cis-neoxanthin, and 9-cis-violaxanthin and the accumulation of ABA, phaseic acid, and dihydrophaseic acid, when leaves from dark-grown plants were stressed for 7 hours. Early in the stress period, reductions in xanthophylls were greater than the accumulation of ABA and its metabolites, suggesting the accumulationmore » of an intermediate which was subsequently converted to ABA. Leaves which were detached, but no stressed, did not accumulate ABA nor were their xanthophyll levels reduced. Leaves from plants that had been sprayed with cycloheximido did not accumulate ABA when stressed, nor were their xanthophyll levels reduced significantly. Incubation of dark-grown stressed leaves in an {sup 18}O{sub 2}-containing atmosphere resulted in the synthesis of ABA with levels of {sup 18}O in the carboxyl group that were virtually identical to those observed in light-grown leaves. The results of these experiments indicate that violaxanthin is an ABA precursor in stressed dark-grown leaves, and they are used to suggest several possible pathways from violaxanthin to ABA.« less
  • Ten day old bush bean plants (Phaseolus vulgaris L. cv Contender) were used to analyze the effects of 3 micromolar Cd on the time courses of expansion growth, dry weight, leaf water relations, stomatal resistance, and abscisic acid (ABA) levels in roots and leaves. Control and Cd-treated plants were grown for 144 hours in nutrient solution. Samples were taken at 24 hour intervals. At the 96 and 144 hour harvests, additional measurements were made on excised leaves which were allowed to dry for 2 hours. From the 48 hour harvest, Cd-treated plants showed lower leaf relative water contents and highermore » stomatal resistances than controls. At the same time, root and leaf expansion growth, but not dry weight, was significantly reduced. The turgor potentials of leaves from Cd-treated plants were nonsignificantly higher than those of control leaves. A significant increase (almost 400%) of the leaf ABA concentration was detected after 120 hours exposure to Cd. But Cd was found to inhibit ABA accumulation during drying of excised leaves. It is concluded that Cd-induced decrease of expansion growth is not due to turgor decrease. The possible mechanisms of Cd-induced stomatal closure are discussed.« less
  • Although abscisic acid (ABA) was discovered 30 years ago, very little is known about its biosynthetic pathway in higher plants. Two hypotheses have been proposed: (i) a direct pathway involving only C-15 intermediates like farnesyl pyrophosphate, (ii) an indirect pathway involving C-40 intermediates like the xanthophylls. When {sup 14}CO{sub 2} was fed into greened bean plants, the {sup 14}C specific activity of ABA was always lower than those in xanthophylls, such as violaxanthin and lutein, regardless of {sup 12}CO{sub 2} chase periods. The ABA accumulation in green leaves was not affected by fluridone when plants were stressed once, but themore » {sup 14}C incorporation into ABA was inhibited to the same extent as those of xanthophylls. The incorporation of {sup 18}O into the ABA ring when violaxanthin was labeled by {sup 18}O in vivo via the violaxanthin cycle indicates that at least a portion of ABA was derived from {sup 18}O-labeled violaxanthin during water stress.« less
  • Research on the biosynthesis of abscisic acid (ABA) has focused primarily on two pathways: (a) the direct pathway from farnesyl pyrophosphate, and (b) the indirect pathway involving a carotenoid precursor. The authors have investigated which biosynthetic pathway is operating in turgid and stressed Xanthium leaves, and in stressed Xanthium roots using long-term incubations in /sup 18/O/sub 2/. It was found that in stressed leaves three atoms of /sup 18/O from /sup 18/O/sub 2/ are incorporated into the ABA molecule, and that the amount of /sup 18/O incorporated increases with time. One /sup 18/O atom is incorporated rapidly into the carboxylmore » group of ABA, whereas the other two atoms are very slowly incorporated into the ring oxygens. The fourth oxygen atom in the carboxyl group of ABA is derived from water. ABA from stressed roots of Xanthium incubated in /sup 18/O/sub 2/ shows a labeling pattern similar to that of ABA in stressed leaves, but with incorporation of more /sup 18/O into the tertiary hydroxyl group at C-1' after 6 and 12 hours than found in ABA from stressed leaves. It is proposed that the precursors to stress-induced ABA are xanthophylls, and that a xanthophyll lacking an oxygen function at C-6 plays a crucial role in ABA biosynthesis in Xanthium roots. In turgid Xanthium leaves, /sup 18/O is incorporated into ABA to a much lesser extent that it is in stressed leaves, whereas exogenously applied /sup 14/C-ABA is completely catabolized within 48 hours. This suggests that ABA in turgid leaves is either (a) made via a biosynthetic pathway which is different from the one in stressed leaves, or (b) has a half-life on the order of days as compared with a half-life of 15.5 hours in water-stressed Xanthium leaves. Phaseic acid showed a labeling pattern similar to that of ABA, but with an additional /sup 18/O incorporated during 8'-hydroxylation of ABA to phaseic acid.« less
  • D-(6-{sup 14}C)Glucosone that had been prepared enzymically from D-(6-{sup 14}C)glucose was used to compare relative efficiencies of these two sugars for L-ascorbic acid (AA) biosynthesis in detached bean (Phaseolus vulgaris L., cv California small white) apices and 4-week-old spinach (Spinacia oleracea L., cv Giant Noble) leaves. At tracer concentration, {sup 14}C from glucosone was utilized by spinach leaves for AA biosynthesis much more effectively than glucose. Carbon-14 from (6-{sup 14}C)glucose underwent considerable redistribution during AA formation, whereas {sup 14}C from (6-{sup 14}C)glucosone remained almost totally in carbon 6 of AA. In other experiments with spinach leaves, L-(U-{sup 14}C)sorbosone was foundmore » to be equivalent to (6-{sup 14}C)glucose as a source of {sup 14}C for AA. In the presence of 0.1% D-glucosone, conversion of (6-{sup 14}C) glucose into labeled AA was greatly repressed. In a comparable experiment with L-sorbosone replacing D-glucosone, the effect was much less. The experiments described here give substance to the proposal that D-glucosone and L-sorbosone are putative intermediates in the conversion of D-glucose to AA in higher plants.« less