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Title: Dehumidification and cooling loads from ventilation air

Abstract

The importance of controlling humidity in buildings is cause for concern, in part, because of indoor air quality problems associated with excess moisture in air-conditioning systems. But more universally, the need for ventilation air has forced HVAC equipment (originally optimized for high efficiency in removing sensible heat loads) to remove high moisture loads. To assist cooling equipment and meet the challenge of larger ventilation loads, several technologies have succeeded in commercial buildings. Newer technologies such as subcool/reheat and heat pipe reheat show promise. These increase latent capacity of cooling-based systems by reducing their sensible capacity. Also, desiccant wheels have traditionally provided deeper-drying capacity by using thermal energy in place of electrical power to remove the latent load. Regardless of what mix of technologies is best for a particular application, there is a need for a more effective way of thinking about the cooling loads created by ventilation air. It is clear from the literature that all-too-frequently, HVAC systems do not perform well unless the ventilation air loads have been effectively addressed at the original design stage. This article proposes an engineering shorthand, an annual load index for ventilation air. This index will aid in the complex process of improving themore » ability of HVAC systems to deal efficiently with the amount of fresh air the industry has deemed useful for maintaining comfort in buildings. Examination of typical behavior of weather shows that latent loads usually exceed sensible loads in ventilation air by at least 3:1 and often as much as 8:1. A designer can use the engineering shorthand indexes presented to quickly assess the importance of this fact for a given system design. To size those components after they are selected, the designer can refer to Chapter 24 of the 1997 ASHRAE Handbook--Fundamentals, which includes separate values for peak moisture and peak temperature.« less

Authors:
 [1];  [2];  [3]
  1. Mason-Grant, Portsmouth, NH (United States)
  2. Quantitative Decision Support, Portsmouth, NH (United States)
  3. Gas Research Inst., Chicago, IL (United States)
Publication Date:
OSTI Identifier:
563883
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Journal Name:
ASHRAE Journal
Additional Journal Information:
Journal Volume: 39; Journal Issue: 11; Other Information: PBD: Nov 1997
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
32 ENERGY CONSERVATION, CONSUMPTION, AND UTILIZATION; VENTILATION SYSTEMS; SPACE HVAC SYSTEMS; COOLING LOAD; DRYING; VENTILATION

Citation Formats

Harriman, L.G. III, Plager, D., and Kosar, D. Dehumidification and cooling loads from ventilation air. United States: N. p., 1997. Web.
Harriman, L.G. III, Plager, D., & Kosar, D. Dehumidification and cooling loads from ventilation air. United States.
Harriman, L.G. III, Plager, D., and Kosar, D. Sat . "Dehumidification and cooling loads from ventilation air". United States.
@article{osti_563883,
title = {Dehumidification and cooling loads from ventilation air},
author = {Harriman, L.G. III and Plager, D. and Kosar, D.},
abstractNote = {The importance of controlling humidity in buildings is cause for concern, in part, because of indoor air quality problems associated with excess moisture in air-conditioning systems. But more universally, the need for ventilation air has forced HVAC equipment (originally optimized for high efficiency in removing sensible heat loads) to remove high moisture loads. To assist cooling equipment and meet the challenge of larger ventilation loads, several technologies have succeeded in commercial buildings. Newer technologies such as subcool/reheat and heat pipe reheat show promise. These increase latent capacity of cooling-based systems by reducing their sensible capacity. Also, desiccant wheels have traditionally provided deeper-drying capacity by using thermal energy in place of electrical power to remove the latent load. Regardless of what mix of technologies is best for a particular application, there is a need for a more effective way of thinking about the cooling loads created by ventilation air. It is clear from the literature that all-too-frequently, HVAC systems do not perform well unless the ventilation air loads have been effectively addressed at the original design stage. This article proposes an engineering shorthand, an annual load index for ventilation air. This index will aid in the complex process of improving the ability of HVAC systems to deal efficiently with the amount of fresh air the industry has deemed useful for maintaining comfort in buildings. Examination of typical behavior of weather shows that latent loads usually exceed sensible loads in ventilation air by at least 3:1 and often as much as 8:1. A designer can use the engineering shorthand indexes presented to quickly assess the importance of this fact for a given system design. To size those components after they are selected, the designer can refer to Chapter 24 of the 1997 ASHRAE Handbook--Fundamentals, which includes separate values for peak moisture and peak temperature.},
doi = {},
journal = {ASHRAE Journal},
number = 11,
volume = 39,
place = {United States},
year = {1997},
month = {11}
}