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Title: An overview of the solar, anomalous, and magnetospheric particle explorer (SAMPEX) mission

Abstract

The scientific objective of the NASA Small-class Explorer Mission SAMPEX are summarized. A brief history of the Small Explorer program is provided along with a description of the SAMPEX project development and structure. The spacecraft and scientific instrument configuration is presented. The orbit of SAMPEX has an altitude of 520 by 670 km and an 82[degree] inclination. Maximum possible power is provided by articulated solar arrays that point continuously toward the sun. Highly sensitive science instruments point generally toward the local zenith, especially over the terrestrial poles, in order to measure optimally the galactic and solar cosmic ray flux. Energetic magnetospheric particle precipitation is monitored at lower geomagnetic latitudes. The spacecraft uses several innovative approaches including an optical fiber bus, powerful onboard computers, and large solid state memories (instead of tape recorders). Spacecraft communication and data acquisition are discussed and the space- and ground-segment data flows are summarized. A mission lifetime of 3 years is sought with the goal of extending data acquisition over an even longer portion of the 11-year solar activity cycle.

Authors:
 [1];  [2]; ; ; ;  [3]
  1. (NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, MD (United States). Lab. for Extraterrestrial Physics)
  2. (Univ. of Maryland, College Park, MD (United States). Dept. of Physics)
  3. (NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, MD (United States). Engineering Directorate)
Publication Date:
OSTI Identifier:
5638784
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Resource Relation:
Journal Name: IEEE Transactions on Geoscience and Remote Sensing (Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers); (United States); Journal Volume: 31:3
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
71 CLASSICAL AND QUANTUM MECHANICS, GENERAL PHYSICS; EARTH MAGNETOSPHERE; RESEARCH PROGRAMS; EXPLORER SATELLITES; CHARGED-PARTICLE PRECIPITATION; COMMUNICATIONS; DATA ACQUISITION; MONITORING; POWER SUPPLIES; SERVICE LIFE; SOLAR ACTIVITY; SOLAR CELL ARRAYS; EARTH ATMOSPHERE; ELECTRONIC EQUIPMENT; EQUIPMENT; LIFETIME; SATELLITES; SOLAR EQUIPMENT; 661320* - Auroral, Ionospheric, & Magnetospheric Phenomena- (1992-)

Citation Formats

Baker, D.N., Mason, G.M., Figueroa, O., Colon, G., Watzin, J.G., and Aleman, R.M. An overview of the solar, anomalous, and magnetospheric particle explorer (SAMPEX) mission. United States: N. p., 1993. Web. doi:10.1109/36.225519.
Baker, D.N., Mason, G.M., Figueroa, O., Colon, G., Watzin, J.G., & Aleman, R.M. An overview of the solar, anomalous, and magnetospheric particle explorer (SAMPEX) mission. United States. doi:10.1109/36.225519.
Baker, D.N., Mason, G.M., Figueroa, O., Colon, G., Watzin, J.G., and Aleman, R.M. 1993. "An overview of the solar, anomalous, and magnetospheric particle explorer (SAMPEX) mission". United States. doi:10.1109/36.225519.
@article{osti_5638784,
title = {An overview of the solar, anomalous, and magnetospheric particle explorer (SAMPEX) mission},
author = {Baker, D.N. and Mason, G.M. and Figueroa, O. and Colon, G. and Watzin, J.G. and Aleman, R.M.},
abstractNote = {The scientific objective of the NASA Small-class Explorer Mission SAMPEX are summarized. A brief history of the Small Explorer program is provided along with a description of the SAMPEX project development and structure. The spacecraft and scientific instrument configuration is presented. The orbit of SAMPEX has an altitude of 520 by 670 km and an 82[degree] inclination. Maximum possible power is provided by articulated solar arrays that point continuously toward the sun. Highly sensitive science instruments point generally toward the local zenith, especially over the terrestrial poles, in order to measure optimally the galactic and solar cosmic ray flux. Energetic magnetospheric particle precipitation is monitored at lower geomagnetic latitudes. The spacecraft uses several innovative approaches including an optical fiber bus, powerful onboard computers, and large solid state memories (instead of tape recorders). Spacecraft communication and data acquisition are discussed and the space- and ground-segment data flows are summarized. A mission lifetime of 3 years is sought with the goal of extending data acquisition over an even longer portion of the 11-year solar activity cycle.},
doi = {10.1109/36.225519},
journal = {IEEE Transactions on Geoscience and Remote Sensing (Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers); (United States)},
number = ,
volume = 31:3,
place = {United States},
year = 1993,
month = 5
}
  • GaAs based solar cells have been developed for spacecraft use for several years. However, acceptance and application of these cells for spacecraft missions has been slow because of their high cost and concerns about their integration onto solar panels. Spectrolab has now completed fabrication of solar panels with GaAs/Ge solar cells for a second space program. This paper will focus on the design, fabrication and test of GaAs/Ge solar panels for the Solar Anomalous and Magnetospheric Particle Explorer (SAMPEX) Program.
  • Results are described from energetic particle detectors onboard the Solar, Anomalous, and Magnetospheric Particle Explorer (SAMPEX) satellite. Electron data are shown for energies {ital E}{gt}400 keV in the outer zone of electron trapping ({ital L}{approx_gt}3). The processes by which electrons are accelerated to very high energies ({ital E}{gt}1 MeV) are discussed. Data are sorted according to {ital L}-values and are compared with concurrent solar wind and geomagnetic conditions. Data from SAMPEX are also compared to GOES and UARS measurements. It is found that high-speed solar wind streams drive the acceleration and recirculation of electrons throughout the outer zone on timemore » scales of one day (or less). Very high time resolution measurements from SAMPEX show the very sporadic nature of magnetosphere-atmosphere coupling processes. {copyright} {ital 1996 American Institute of Physics.}« less
  • Phenomena at and near the boundary of the magnetosphere during the prolonged initial phase of a mild magnetic storm on September 13, 1961, were observed with a variety of magnetic field and particle detectors in Explorer 12. There was an abrupt termination of the regular geomagnetic field and a coincident discontinuity in the intensity of trapped particles at a geocentric radial distance of 8.2 earth radii. A mean directional energy flux of the order of tens of ergs (cm/sup 2/ sec ster)/sup -1/ was observed outside the boundary. This energy flux is interpreted as being due to an omnidirectional intensitymore » of the order of 10/sup 10/ (cm/sup 2/ sec)/sup -1/ of electrons having energies of a few kev. From the Chapman- Ferraro point of view, these electrons are believed to be the observable component of a piston' of quasi-thermalized plasma, of the order of 10,000 km thick, which acted as the pressuretransmitting agent between the directional solar wind and the geomagnetic field. Possible relationships between these observations and the third radiation belt' of Gringauz are considered. 29 references. (auth)« less
  • Using data from the Magnetospheric Multiscale (MMS) and Cluster missions obtained in the solar wind, we examine second-order and fourth-order structure functions at varying spatial lags normalized to ion inertial scales. The analysis includes direct two-spacecraft results and single-spacecraft results employing the familiar Taylor frozen-in flow approximation. Several familiar statistical results, including the spectral distribution of energy, and the sale-dependent kurtosis, are extended down to unprecedented spatial scales of ∼6 km, approaching electron scales. The Taylor approximation is also confirmed at those small scales, although small deviations are present in the kinetic range. The kurtosis is seen to attain verymore » high values at sub-proton scales, supporting the previously reported suggestion that monofractal behavior may be due to high-frequency plasma waves at kinetic scales.« less