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Title: Health-hazard evaluation report HETA-87-300-0000, B. F. Goodrich Company, Marietta, Ohio

Abstract

A study was made of possible hazardous working conditions at the B.F. Goodrich Company, Marietta, Ohio. Of particular concern were cases of dermatitis possibly arising from skin exposure to substances handled on the job. The compounding and calendaring working environments were contaminated by powder and liquid spills. Ample opportunity existed for workers to contact the aziridine-based cross-linking agent, polyfunctional acrylates, methylmethacrylate, epoxy resins, and sulfonate used in printing and compounding processes. Skin patch testing was performed to test for dermal sensitization to agents used during the performance of normal activities. All Compounding personnel and Calendaring personnel associated with printing, ink production, and embossing who had dermatitis of the face, neck and/or arms, were asked to participate. The 126 persons tested represented 70% of persons employed in these departments. The authors recommend an educational program for workers, use of coveralls, better housekeeping in the Compounding Department and other areas of the facility, use of vacuum systems or wet mopping to remove accumulated dust, avoidance of food in work areas, improved ventilation system, use of organic vapor cartridge respirators, improved personal hygiene, use of barrier creams, and improved medical surveillance of dermatitis cases.

Authors:
; ;
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
National Inst. for Occupational Safety and Health, Cincinnati, OH (USA). Div. of Surveillance, Hazard Evaluation and Field Studies
OSTI Identifier:
5632984
Alternate Identifier(s):
OSTI ID: 5632984
Report Number(s):
PB-89-188007/XAB; HETA-87-300-0000
Resource Type:
Technical Report
Resource Relation:
Other Information: See also PB--88-236880
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
54 ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCES; 99 GENERAL AND MISCELLANEOUS//MATHEMATICS, COMPUTING, AND INFORMATION SCIENCE; HAZARDOUS MATERIALS; INDOOR AIR POLLUTION; INKS; HEALTH HAZARDS; KETONES; OCCUPATIONAL EXPOSURE; ORGANIC SOLVENTS; PRINTING AND PUBLISHING INDUSTRY; RESINS; DERMATITIS; INDUSTRIAL MEDICINE; INSPECTION; PLASTICS INDUSTRY; SKIN DISEASES; SURVEYS; TOXICITY; AIR POLLUTION; DISEASES; HAZARDS; INDUSTRY; MATERIALS; MEDICINE; ORGANIC COMPOUNDS; ORGANIC POLYMERS; PETROCHEMICALS; PETROLEUM PRODUCTS; POLLUTION; POLYMERS; SOLVENTS 500200* -- Environment, Atmospheric-- Chemicals Monitoring & Transport-- (-1989); 552000 -- Public Health

Citation Formats

Richardson, F.D., Almaguer, D., and Mathias, C. Health-hazard evaluation report HETA-87-300-0000, B. F. Goodrich Company, Marietta, Ohio. United States: N. p., 1988. Web.
Richardson, F.D., Almaguer, D., & Mathias, C. Health-hazard evaluation report HETA-87-300-0000, B. F. Goodrich Company, Marietta, Ohio. United States.
Richardson, F.D., Almaguer, D., and Mathias, C. Wed . "Health-hazard evaluation report HETA-87-300-0000, B. F. Goodrich Company, Marietta, Ohio". United States. doi:.
@article{osti_5632984,
title = {Health-hazard evaluation report HETA-87-300-0000, B. F. Goodrich Company, Marietta, Ohio},
author = {Richardson, F.D. and Almaguer, D. and Mathias, C.},
abstractNote = {A study was made of possible hazardous working conditions at the B.F. Goodrich Company, Marietta, Ohio. Of particular concern were cases of dermatitis possibly arising from skin exposure to substances handled on the job. The compounding and calendaring working environments were contaminated by powder and liquid spills. Ample opportunity existed for workers to contact the aziridine-based cross-linking agent, polyfunctional acrylates, methylmethacrylate, epoxy resins, and sulfonate used in printing and compounding processes. Skin patch testing was performed to test for dermal sensitization to agents used during the performance of normal activities. All Compounding personnel and Calendaring personnel associated with printing, ink production, and embossing who had dermatitis of the face, neck and/or arms, were asked to participate. The 126 persons tested represented 70% of persons employed in these departments. The authors recommend an educational program for workers, use of coveralls, better housekeeping in the Compounding Department and other areas of the facility, use of vacuum systems or wet mopping to remove accumulated dust, avoidance of food in work areas, improved ventilation system, use of organic vapor cartridge respirators, improved personal hygiene, use of barrier creams, and improved medical surveillance of dermatitis cases.},
doi = {},
journal = {},
number = ,
volume = ,
place = {United States},
year = {Wed Jun 01 00:00:00 EDT 1988},
month = {Wed Jun 01 00:00:00 EDT 1988}
}

Technical Report:
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  • In response to a request from the United Rubber, Cork, Linoleum and Plastic Workers of America Local 715, an investigation was made of an apparent excess of cancers appearing among workers in the B.F. Goodrich tire manufacturing facility located in Woodburn, Indiana. Excesses were reported in the milling and tuber areas of the facility. Company medical records, death certificates, and medical records from private physicians or hospitals were used to obtain data. Five cases of lung cancer and one of leukemia were confirmed. Analysis revealed a ten-fold increase in lung-cancer incidence over the expected number. In a survey made 5more » years previously, breathing-zone samples were taken for nitrosamines, for which NIOSH recommends keeping exposure as low as possible. Exposures to N-nitrosomorpholine ranged from 0.5 to 1.8 micrograms per cubic meter (microg/m/sup 3/) and exposures to N-nitrosodimethylamine ranged up to 0.09microg/m/sup 3/. Exposures to benzene in 1975 ranged from 0.5 to 11.9 parts per million. Measurements taken since 1980 showed significantly lower levels. Also, prior to 1979, talc was used at the facility, suggesting possible exposure to asbestos.« less
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