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Title: Effective dose equivalent to the operator in intra-oral dental radiography

Abstract

The effective dose equivalent to the operator in intra-oral dental radiography has been determined. The exposure from a bitewing radiograph and periapical views of the left maxillary incisors and first molar was measured at nine heights and 16 positions, all 1 m from the patient. The effective dose equivalent was determined using data from ICRP 51 (International Commission on Radiological Protection: Data for Use in Protection Against External Radiation). The values presented are related to an exposure of 1 C kg-1 (3876 R) measured free in air at the tube-end. They thus constitute ratios which are not influenced by the sensitivity of the film or other detector used and form standard tables which permit the calculation of the effective dose equivalent in clinical situations.

Authors:
;  [1]
  1. (Utrecht Univ., (The Netherlands))
Publication Date:
OSTI Identifier:
5602280
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Resource Relation:
Journal Name: Dento-Maxillo-Facial Radiology; (USA); Journal Volume: 19:3
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
63 RADIATION, THERMAL, AND OTHER ENVIRON. POLLUTANT EFFECTS ON LIVING ORGS. AND BIOL. MAT.; DENTISTRY; RADIATION PROTECTION; RADIOLOGICAL PERSONNEL; RADIATION DOSES; BIOMEDICAL RADIOGRAPHY; DOSE EQUIVALENTS; ORAL CAVITY; DIAGNOSTIC TECHNIQUES; DIGESTIVE SYSTEM; DOSES; MEDICAL PERSONNEL; MEDICINE; NUCLEAR MEDICINE; PERSONNEL; RADIOLOGY; 560151* - Radiation Effects on Animals- Man

Citation Formats

de Haan, R.A., and van Aken, J. Effective dose equivalent to the operator in intra-oral dental radiography. United States: N. p., 1990. Web. doi:10.1259/dmfr.19.3.2088783.
de Haan, R.A., & van Aken, J. Effective dose equivalent to the operator in intra-oral dental radiography. United States. doi:10.1259/dmfr.19.3.2088783.
de Haan, R.A., and van Aken, J. 1990. "Effective dose equivalent to the operator in intra-oral dental radiography". United States. doi:10.1259/dmfr.19.3.2088783.
@article{osti_5602280,
title = {Effective dose equivalent to the operator in intra-oral dental radiography},
author = {de Haan, R.A. and van Aken, J.},
abstractNote = {The effective dose equivalent to the operator in intra-oral dental radiography has been determined. The exposure from a bitewing radiograph and periapical views of the left maxillary incisors and first molar was measured at nine heights and 16 positions, all 1 m from the patient. The effective dose equivalent was determined using data from ICRP 51 (International Commission on Radiological Protection: Data for Use in Protection Against External Radiation). The values presented are related to an exposure of 1 C kg-1 (3876 R) measured free in air at the tube-end. They thus constitute ratios which are not influenced by the sensitivity of the film or other detector used and form standard tables which permit the calculation of the effective dose equivalent in clinical situations.},
doi = {10.1259/dmfr.19.3.2088783},
journal = {Dento-Maxillo-Facial Radiology; (USA)},
number = ,
volume = 19:3,
place = {United States},
year = 1990,
month = 8
}
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