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Title: District heating/cooling feasibility study for Jamestown, New York

Abstract

The report describes the results of a district heating feasibility study for Jamestown, New York based on the use of a power plant located within the city limits. Several options for the extraction of heat from the power plant were developed, with heat balances presented, based on the development of a hot water district heating system. The geography and climate of the area are discussed, as well as the primary potential heat district. The heat load assessment was based on fuel consumption data collected from a sampling of various types of structures and operations. The report presents the methodology in detail, along with block-by-block results including heated floor space, total annual fuel consumed, and peak heat rate demands. A transmission and distribution system was then developed for delivering heat from the power plant to the district heating customers.

Authors:
; ; ;
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Burns and Roe, Inc., Oradell, NJ (USA)
OSTI Identifier:
5601234
Report Number(s):
PB-83-247023
Resource Type:
Technical Report
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
32 ENERGY CONSERVATION, CONSUMPTION, AND UTILIZATION; DISTRICT HEATING; FEASIBILITY STUDIES; FUEL CONSUMPTION; HEAT EXTRACTION; HEATING LOAD; NEW YORK; PUBLIC UTILITIES; THERMAL POWER PLANTS; URBAN AREAS; ENERGY CONSUMPTION; FEDERAL REGION II; HEATING; NORTH AMERICA; POWER PLANTS; USA 320603* -- Energy Conservation, Consumption, & Utilization-- Municipalities & Community Systems-- Public Utilities-- (1980-)

Citation Formats

Oliker, I., Buffa, W., Harms, R., and Preston, E.. District heating/cooling feasibility study for Jamestown, New York. United States: N. p., 1982. Web.
Oliker, I., Buffa, W., Harms, R., & Preston, E.. District heating/cooling feasibility study for Jamestown, New York. United States.
Oliker, I., Buffa, W., Harms, R., and Preston, E.. 1982. "District heating/cooling feasibility study for Jamestown, New York". United States. doi:.
@article{osti_5601234,
title = {District heating/cooling feasibility study for Jamestown, New York},
author = {Oliker, I. and Buffa, W. and Harms, R. and Preston, E.},
abstractNote = {The report describes the results of a district heating feasibility study for Jamestown, New York based on the use of a power plant located within the city limits. Several options for the extraction of heat from the power plant were developed, with heat balances presented, based on the development of a hot water district heating system. The geography and climate of the area are discussed, as well as the primary potential heat district. The heat load assessment was based on fuel consumption data collected from a sampling of various types of structures and operations. The report presents the methodology in detail, along with block-by-block results including heated floor space, total annual fuel consumed, and peak heat rate demands. A transmission and distribution system was then developed for delivering heat from the power plant to the district heating customers.},
doi = {},
journal = {},
number = ,
volume = ,
place = {United States},
year = 1982,
month =
}

Technical Report:
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  • The results of the District Heating/Cooling Feasibility Study for Jamestown, NY are presented. The heat source for the system is a power plant located within the city limits. Several options for the extraction of heat from the power plant are developed and heat balances are presented. The options are based on the development of a hot water district heating system. The geography and climate of the area are discussed and the primary potential district heat district is described. The heat load assessment was based on fuel consumption data collected from a sampling of various types of structures and operations. Themore » methodology is presented in detail followed by the block-by-block results which include the heated floor space, the annual total fuel consumed, the annual fuel consumed for comfort use, and the peak heat rate demands. The heating fuel demand and consumption for most of the major industries in the city is presented. A transmission and distribution system is developed to deliver heat from the power plant to the district heating customers. The piping design is described and the proposed pipe routing for the primary district is presented. Cost estimates are presented for the different district heating options developed. The cost of heat from the Jamestown district heating system has been determined using the required revenue approach to determine the minimum rate the utility must charge for district heat in order to break even. An analysis has also been performed to determine the maximum allowable charge for district heat that would allow consumers to recover their retrofit expenses in a five year period.« less
  • This document presents the results of the second phase District Heating Feasibility Study for Jamestown, NY. The study takes an in-depth look at a hot water district heating system using the Jamestown municipal electric plant as the heat source and the downtown area as the primary load. The study considers phased expansion to outlying areas. This second phase study was performed in light of the findings of a first phase district heating study which determined that district heating was technically and economically feasible in Jamestown. The objective of this second phase study is to perform a detailed assessment of districtmore » heating and present the findings to the City in sufficient detail to serve as a basis for deciding whether or not to proceed with final design and construction of a district heating system. The study assesses the technical, financial and institutional feasibility of the system, recommends system ownership and financing strategies, develops a phased implementation plan, identifies prospective users and analyzes potential user performance from both a technical and economic point of view. The study concludes that a municipal district heating system financed with municipal bonds could be developed in Jamestown to economically supply heat to the downtown area and the industrial corridor. The study shows that district heating could successfully compete with alternate fuels, allowing most customers to recover their district heating retrofit costs in three to four years.« less
  • This report details an investigation to implement district heating in Jamestown, New York. It is a technical and economic feasibility study of a hot-water district-heating system, using a municipal electric plant as the heat source and the downtown area as a source for customers. As a result of the project, the City of Jamestown built a district-heating system that was a service to four customers in 1984 and expanded to 14 customers in 1985. The City expects it to grow in 1986 and beyond. Customers are realizing a 20 to 30% savings in heating costs. The municipal electric plant burnsmore » coal and the system so far has displaced the equivalent of 1 million gallons of oil per year.« less
  • The Industrial Corridor of Jamestown, New York, contains more than twenty industrial/manufacturing companies, whose thermal demands, in addition to space heating, include significant process heating loads. This study investigated in depth, the technical and economic feasibility of implementing a district heating system in the Industrial Corridor which can serve both process and space heating loads. Based upon the heat load assessment conducted, the study focused upon nine companies with the largest thermal demand. Alternative system implementation designs were considered including new conventional centralized boiler plants, gas turbine cogeneration, and both high temperature hot water and steam as the heat transportmore » media in an underground distribution system. The study concluded that, in view of the nature of existing prospective customer loads being primarily steam based, the most economical system for near term phased development is a steam based system with a new conventional centrally located steam boiler plant. The economic potential for a cogeneration system was found to be sensitive to electricity buy back rates, which at present, are not attractive. Implementing a modern high temperature hot water system would require significant customer retrofit costs to convert their steam based systems to hot water, resulting in long and unattractive pay back periods. Unless customer hot water retrofit costs can be expended without penalty to the district system economics, hot water district heating is not considered economically feasible. Chapters describe heat load assessment; heat source analysis; system implementation; transmission and distribution systems assessment; institutional assessment; system economic analysis; and customer retrofit, economic analysis, and conclusions 20 figs., 22 tabs.« less
  • The objective of this project is to perform a preliminary investigation of the technical and economic feasibility of implementing a district heating and cooling (DHC) system in the City of Dunkirk, New York. The study was conducted by first defining a heating and cooling (HC) load service area. Then, questionnaires were sent to prospective DHC customers. After reviewing the owners responses, large consumers of energy were interviewed for more detail of their HC systems, including site visits, to determine possibilities of retrofitting their systems to district heating and cooling. Peak HC loads for the buildings were estimated by Burns andmore » Roe's in-house computer programs. Based on the peak loads, certain customers were determined for suitability as anchor customers. Various options using cogeneration were investigated for possible HC sources. Equipment for HC sources and HC loads were sized and their associated costs estimated. Finally, economic analyses were performed. The conclusion is that it is technically and economically feasible to implement a district heating and cooling system in the City of Dunkirk. 14 figs., 15 tabs.« less