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Title: Chemical characterization of components in fingerprints

Abstract

Investigations into the chemical composition of fingerprints were initiated after it was observed that the latent fingerprints of children disappear more rapidly from surfaces than those of adults. Initial work included the use of GUMS for the identification of compounds present in fingerprints. The relative concentrations of fatty acids and alkyl esters in children and adults appear to contribute to the higher rate of disappearance of prints from the younger subjects. The presence of alkyl esters is linked to sebaceous excretions originating from the face, which increase markedly after puberty. This work has been expanded to include characterization of other classes of components, including amino acids and triacylglycerols. This research is part of an ongoing project to identify various components of fingerprints and explore possible clinical and forensic applications. Through large sampling pools, trends that can indicate personal characteristics (i.e., gender, age), habits (smoking, drug use), and health-related issues (diabetes) are being investigated.

Authors:
; ;  [1];  [2]
  1. Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States)
  2. Knoxville Police Dept., TN (United States)
Publication Date:
OSTI Identifier:
559836
Report Number(s):
CONF-970443-
TRN: 97:005895-0009
Resource Type:
Conference
Resource Relation:
Conference: 213. national meeting of the American Chemical Society, San Francisco, CA (United States), 13-17 Apr 1997; Other Information: PBD: 1997; Related Information: Is Part Of 213th ACS national meeting; PB: 2904 p.
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
40 CHEMISTRY; ADULTS; AMINO ACIDS; CHEMICAL COMPOSITION; ESTERS; FINGERS; CHEMICAL ANALYSIS; IDENTIFICATION SYSTEMS

Citation Formats

Jarboe, S.G., Asano, K.G., Buchanan, M.V., and Bohanan, A. Chemical characterization of components in fingerprints. United States: N. p., 1997. Web.
Jarboe, S.G., Asano, K.G., Buchanan, M.V., & Bohanan, A. Chemical characterization of components in fingerprints. United States.
Jarboe, S.G., Asano, K.G., Buchanan, M.V., and Bohanan, A. 1997. "Chemical characterization of components in fingerprints". United States. doi:.
@article{osti_559836,
title = {Chemical characterization of components in fingerprints},
author = {Jarboe, S.G. and Asano, K.G. and Buchanan, M.V. and Bohanan, A.},
abstractNote = {Investigations into the chemical composition of fingerprints were initiated after it was observed that the latent fingerprints of children disappear more rapidly from surfaces than those of adults. Initial work included the use of GUMS for the identification of compounds present in fingerprints. The relative concentrations of fatty acids and alkyl esters in children and adults appear to contribute to the higher rate of disappearance of prints from the younger subjects. The presence of alkyl esters is linked to sebaceous excretions originating from the face, which increase markedly after puberty. This work has been expanded to include characterization of other classes of components, including amino acids and triacylglycerols. This research is part of an ongoing project to identify various components of fingerprints and explore possible clinical and forensic applications. Through large sampling pools, trends that can indicate personal characteristics (i.e., gender, age), habits (smoking, drug use), and health-related issues (diabetes) are being investigated.},
doi = {},
journal = {},
number = ,
volume = ,
place = {United States},
year = 1997,
month =
}

Conference:
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