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Title: Feasibility of systematic recycling of aircraft halon extinguishing agents. Final report

Abstract

This study was performed to determine the feasibility of recycling Halon 1301 extinguishing agent for support of the United States civil aircraft fleet until 2020. Research for this study centered around known relationships of refrigerants; scientific principles of Avogadro, Dalton, Henry, Raoult, and natural physical properties of Halon 1301. results of this study demonstrate that recovery of Halon 1301 to military specification purity requirements is practical. Agent recovery efficiency of 98 percent (minimum) can be expected; and the recovered agent can meet applicable purity requirements, except for a maximum noncondensible gas content of 10 pounds per square inch partial pressure at 70 degrees Fahrenheit. Support of current and future United States domestic civil fleet until 2020 and beyond requires less than 5 percent of the projected 1994 Halon 1301 bank.

Authors:
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Kidde (Walter) Aerospace, Inc., Wilson, NC (United States)
OSTI Identifier:
5581545
Report Number(s):
AD-A-247280/1/XAB; R--4566
CNN: DTFA03-90-C-00039
Resource Type:
Technical Report
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
32 ENERGY CONSERVATION, CONSUMPTION, AND UTILIZATION; FREONS; RECYCLING; AIRCRAFT; EFFICIENCY; FEASIBILITY STUDIES; FIRE EXTINGUISHERS; MATERIALS RECOVERY; PARTIAL PRESSURE; PHYSICAL PROPERTIES; POLYMERS; SPECIFICATIONS; HALOGENATED ALIPHATIC HYDROCARBONS; MANAGEMENT; ORGANIC COMPOUNDS; ORGANIC HALOGEN COMPOUNDS; PROCESSING; RECOVERY; WASTE MANAGEMENT; WASTE PROCESSING 320305* -- Energy Conservation, Consumption, & Utilization-- Industrial & Agricultural Processes-- Industrial Waste Management

Citation Formats

Mitchell, M.D. Feasibility of systematic recycling of aircraft halon extinguishing agents. Final report. United States: N. p., 1991. Web.
Mitchell, M.D. Feasibility of systematic recycling of aircraft halon extinguishing agents. Final report. United States.
Mitchell, M.D. 1991. "Feasibility of systematic recycling of aircraft halon extinguishing agents. Final report". United States. doi:.
@article{osti_5581545,
title = {Feasibility of systematic recycling of aircraft halon extinguishing agents. Final report},
author = {Mitchell, M.D.},
abstractNote = {This study was performed to determine the feasibility of recycling Halon 1301 extinguishing agent for support of the United States civil aircraft fleet until 2020. Research for this study centered around known relationships of refrigerants; scientific principles of Avogadro, Dalton, Henry, Raoult, and natural physical properties of Halon 1301. results of this study demonstrate that recovery of Halon 1301 to military specification purity requirements is practical. Agent recovery efficiency of 98 percent (minimum) can be expected; and the recovered agent can meet applicable purity requirements, except for a maximum noncondensible gas content of 10 pounds per square inch partial pressure at 70 degrees Fahrenheit. Support of current and future United States domestic civil fleet until 2020 and beyond requires less than 5 percent of the projected 1994 Halon 1301 bank.},
doi = {},
journal = {},
number = ,
volume = ,
place = {United States},
year = 1991,
month =
}

Technical Report:
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