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Title: Response of young ponderosa pines, shrubs, and grasses to two release treatments. Forest Service research note

Abstract

To release a young pine plantation on a medium site in central California, herbicides and mulches were applied soon after planting to study their effectiveness. Bearclover is an aggressive shrub species that resprouts from rhizomes after disturbance, and must be controlled if young conifer seedlings are to become established. After 4 years, resprouting bearclover plants numbered 282,000 per acre in the control, but less than 4,000 per acre in the plots treated by herbicides. Mean foliar cover was 63 percent versus 1 percent for control and herbicide plots, respectively. Ponderosa pine seedlings were significantly taller, had larger mean diameters, and survived better in the herbicide treatment than counterparts in mulched plots and control. The 5-foot square mulches were ineffective for controlling bearclover. Cheatgrass invaded the plantation in the second year, and after 2 more years became abundant in herbicide plots and plentiful in the control.

Authors:
;
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Forest Service, Berkeley, CA (United States). Pacific Southwest Forest and Range Experiment Station
OSTI Identifier:
557568
Report Number(s):
PB-98-107105/XAB; FSRN-PSW-419
TRN: 73444528
Resource Type:
Technical Report
Resource Relation:
Other Information: PBD: Jul 1996
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
09 BIOMASS FUELS; PINES; SILVICULTURE; HERBICIDES; EVALUATED DATA

Citation Formats

McDonald, P.M., and Everest, G.A. Response of young ponderosa pines, shrubs, and grasses to two release treatments. Forest Service research note. United States: N. p., 1996. Web.
McDonald, P.M., & Everest, G.A. Response of young ponderosa pines, shrubs, and grasses to two release treatments. Forest Service research note. United States.
McDonald, P.M., and Everest, G.A. Mon . "Response of young ponderosa pines, shrubs, and grasses to two release treatments. Forest Service research note". United States. doi:.
@article{osti_557568,
title = {Response of young ponderosa pines, shrubs, and grasses to two release treatments. Forest Service research note},
author = {McDonald, P.M. and Everest, G.A.},
abstractNote = {To release a young pine plantation on a medium site in central California, herbicides and mulches were applied soon after planting to study their effectiveness. Bearclover is an aggressive shrub species that resprouts from rhizomes after disturbance, and must be controlled if young conifer seedlings are to become established. After 4 years, resprouting bearclover plants numbered 282,000 per acre in the control, but less than 4,000 per acre in the plots treated by herbicides. Mean foliar cover was 63 percent versus 1 percent for control and herbicide plots, respectively. Ponderosa pine seedlings were significantly taller, had larger mean diameters, and survived better in the herbicide treatment than counterparts in mulched plots and control. The 5-foot square mulches were ineffective for controlling bearclover. Cheatgrass invaded the plantation in the second year, and after 2 more years became abundant in herbicide plots and plentiful in the control.},
doi = {},
journal = {},
number = ,
volume = ,
place = {United States},
year = {Mon Jul 01 00:00:00 EDT 1996},
month = {Mon Jul 01 00:00:00 EDT 1996}
}

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