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Title: New technique for installing screen wicking into Inconel 718 heat pipe

Abstract

The creep behavior of superalloys, including Inconel 718, in the presence of liquid sodium is not yet known. To study this problem, the NASA Lewis Research Center has initiated a program with the Energy Technology Engineering Center (ETEC) of Rockwell International Corporation to fill with sodium and creep-test three small cylindrical heat pipes of Inconel 718 for a period of 1000 hours each. This report documents the design and the construction methods that were used at NASA Lewis to fabricate these heat pipes. Of particular importance in the heat pipe construction was the installation of the screen wicking by using an expandable mandrel and differential thermal expansion. This installation technique differs from anything known to have been reported in the heat pipe literature and may be of interest to other workers in the heat pipe field.

Authors:
;  [1];  [2]
  1. (NASA Lewis Research Center, 21000 Brookpark Road, Cleveland, Ohio 44135 (United States))
  2. (Sverdrup Technology, Inc., Lewis Research Center Group, 2001 Aerospace Parkway, Brook Park, Ohio 44142 (United States))
Publication Date:
OSTI Identifier:
5574855
Report Number(s):
CONF-930103--
Journal ID: ISSN 0094-243X; CODEN: APCPCS
Resource Type:
Conference
Resource Relation:
Journal Name: AIP Conference Proceedings (American Institute of Physics); (United States); Journal Volume: 271:1; Conference: 10. symposium on space nuclear power and propulsion, Albuquerque, NM (United States), 10-14 Jan 1993
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
42 ENGINEERING; HEAT PIPES; HEAT PIPE WICKS; CREEP; FABRICATION; INCONEL 718; LIQUID METALS; SODIUM; THERMAL EXPANSION; ALKALI METALS; ALLOY-NI53CR19FE19NB5MO3; ALLOYS; ALUMINIUM ADDITIONS; ALUMINIUM ALLOYS; CHROMIUM ALLOYS; CORROSION RESISTANT ALLOYS; ELEMENTS; EXPANSION; FLUIDS; HEAT RESISTANT MATERIALS; HEAT RESISTING ALLOYS; INCONEL ALLOYS; IRON ALLOYS; LIQUIDS; MATERIALS; MECHANICAL PROPERTIES; METALS; MOLYBDENUM ALLOYS; NICKEL ALLOYS; NICKEL BASE ALLOYS; NIOBIUM A 420200* -- Engineering-- Facilities, Equipment, & Techniques

Citation Formats

Giriunas, J.A., Watson, G.K., and Tower, L.K. New technique for installing screen wicking into Inconel 718 heat pipe. United States: N. p., 1993. Web.
Giriunas, J.A., Watson, G.K., & Tower, L.K. New technique for installing screen wicking into Inconel 718 heat pipe. United States.
Giriunas, J.A., Watson, G.K., and Tower, L.K. 1993. "New technique for installing screen wicking into Inconel 718 heat pipe". United States. doi:.
@article{osti_5574855,
title = {New technique for installing screen wicking into Inconel 718 heat pipe},
author = {Giriunas, J.A. and Watson, G.K. and Tower, L.K.},
abstractNote = {The creep behavior of superalloys, including Inconel 718, in the presence of liquid sodium is not yet known. To study this problem, the NASA Lewis Research Center has initiated a program with the Energy Technology Engineering Center (ETEC) of Rockwell International Corporation to fill with sodium and creep-test three small cylindrical heat pipes of Inconel 718 for a period of 1000 hours each. This report documents the design and the construction methods that were used at NASA Lewis to fabricate these heat pipes. Of particular importance in the heat pipe construction was the installation of the screen wicking by using an expandable mandrel and differential thermal expansion. This installation technique differs from anything known to have been reported in the heat pipe literature and may be of interest to other workers in the heat pipe field.},
doi = {},
journal = {AIP Conference Proceedings (American Institute of Physics); (United States)},
number = ,
volume = 271:1,
place = {United States},
year = 1993,
month = 1
}

Conference:
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