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Title: The future of nuclear power in Latin America

Abstract

The purpose of this paper is to analyze the future prospects of nuclear power in Latin America. As part of the developing world, Latin America has a great potential for energy growth. Although there are substantial differences among the different countries of the area, one common denominator is the relatively low per-capita energy consumption. As in many other regions of the world, nuclear power makes sense to complement hydro and fossil-fueled power generation. One of the main restrictions to the growth of nuclear power has been the relatively small size of some electric system. As in most developing countries, the damage to the environment due to the energy-producing systems is very important. In countries like Cuba, nuclear power is clearly the most economical source, since the country lacks indigenous energy resources and the need to import primary energy sources favors nuclear power. The problem of the Latin American region is a severe shortage of financial resources. Standardization has been recognized as one of the better mechanisms to lower nuclear power costs. Argentina has been proposing the construction of CANDU-type reactors as the basis for their standard program, and some years ago Mexico took steps to launch a program for themore » installation of {approx}20 identical units. As in the whole world, the general public is reluctant to accept nuclear power. So far, nuclear power plants have been important to Latin America, with varying levels of local participation, but with imported technology. Unless a major scientific breakthrough takes place, nuclear power will constitute an important component of the energy system in Latin America.« less

Authors:
Publication Date:
OSTI Identifier:
5559183
Report Number(s):
CONF-8810179-
Journal ID: ISSN 0003-018X; CODEN: TANSA; TRN: 89-027936
Resource Type:
Conference
Resource Relation:
Journal Name: Transactions of the American Nuclear Society; (USA); Journal Volume: 58; Conference: International conference on nuclear fission: fifty years of progress in energy security, Washington, DC (USA), 30 Oct - 4 Nov 1988
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
29 ENERGY PLANNING, POLICY AND ECONOMY; LATIN AMERICA; NUCLEAR POWER; TECHNOLOGY UTILIZATION; CANDU TYPE REACTORS; DEVELOPING COUNTRIES; ECONOMIC IMPACT; ELECTRICITY; ENERGY ANALYSIS; ENERGY SOURCE DEVELOPMENT; ENVIRONMENTAL IMPACTS; GREENHOUSE EFFECT; HYDROELECTRIC POWER; IMPORTS; NUCLEAR POWER PLANTS; PUBLIC OPINION; PWR TYPE REACTORS; REACTOR COMPONENTS; SAFETY; STANDARDIZATION; SUPPLY AND DEMAND; ELECTRIC POWER; ENERGY SOURCES; HEAVY WATER MODERATED REACTORS; NUCLEAR FACILITIES; POWER; POWER PLANTS; PRESSURE TUBE REACTORS; REACTORS; RENEWABLE ENERGY SOURCES; THERMAL POWER PLANTS; THERMAL REACTORS; WATER COOLED REACTORS; WATER MODERATED REACTORS; 290600* - Energy Planning & Policy- Nuclear Energy

Citation Formats

Eibenschutz, J. The future of nuclear power in Latin America. United States: N. p., 1989. Web.
Eibenschutz, J. The future of nuclear power in Latin America. United States.
Eibenschutz, J. Sun . "The future of nuclear power in Latin America". United States. doi:.
@article{osti_5559183,
title = {The future of nuclear power in Latin America},
author = {Eibenschutz, J.},
abstractNote = {The purpose of this paper is to analyze the future prospects of nuclear power in Latin America. As part of the developing world, Latin America has a great potential for energy growth. Although there are substantial differences among the different countries of the area, one common denominator is the relatively low per-capita energy consumption. As in many other regions of the world, nuclear power makes sense to complement hydro and fossil-fueled power generation. One of the main restrictions to the growth of nuclear power has been the relatively small size of some electric system. As in most developing countries, the damage to the environment due to the energy-producing systems is very important. In countries like Cuba, nuclear power is clearly the most economical source, since the country lacks indigenous energy resources and the need to import primary energy sources favors nuclear power. The problem of the Latin American region is a severe shortage of financial resources. Standardization has been recognized as one of the better mechanisms to lower nuclear power costs. Argentina has been proposing the construction of CANDU-type reactors as the basis for their standard program, and some years ago Mexico took steps to launch a program for the installation of {approx}20 identical units. As in the whole world, the general public is reluctant to accept nuclear power. So far, nuclear power plants have been important to Latin America, with varying levels of local participation, but with imported technology. Unless a major scientific breakthrough takes place, nuclear power will constitute an important component of the energy system in Latin America.},
doi = {},
journal = {Transactions of the American Nuclear Society; (USA)},
number = ,
volume = 58,
place = {United States},
year = {Sun Jan 01 00:00:00 EST 1989},
month = {Sun Jan 01 00:00:00 EST 1989}
}

Conference:
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