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Title: Summary of the U. S. Geological Survey National Water Quality Assessment Program

Abstract

Beginning in 1986, the Congress appropriated funds for the US Geological Survey to test and refine concepts for a National Water Quality Assessment Program. At present, the program is in a pilot phase with field studies occurring in seven areas around the Nation. In 1990, a committee of the National Academy of Sciences will complete an evaluation of the design and potential utility of the program. A decision about moving to full-scale implementation will be made upon completion of the evaluation. The program is intended to address a wide range of national water quality issues that include chemical contamination, acidification, eutrophication, salinity, sedimentation, and sanitary quality. The goals of the program are to: (1) provide nationally consistent descriptions of current water quality conditions for a large part of the Nation's water resources; (2) define long-term trends in water quality; and (3) identify and describe the relations of both current conditions and trends in water quality to natural and human factors. This information will be provided to water managers, policy makers, and the public to provide an improved scientific basis for evaluating the effectiveness of water quality management programs and for predicting the likely effects of contemplated changes in land- andmore » water-management practices.« less

Authors:
; ;
Publication Date:
OSTI Identifier:
5544397
Alternate Identifier(s):
OSTI ID: 5544397
Resource Type:
Book
Resource Relation:
Related Information: USGS Open-File Report 88-95
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
54 ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCES; 01 COAL, LIGNITE, AND PEAT; WATER QUALITY; RESEARCH PROGRAMS; ACIDIFICATION; AQUIFERS; EUTROPHICATION; GEOLOGIC SURVEYS; LAND USE; METALS; NUTRIENTS; PESTICIDES; WATER POLLUTION; ELEMENTS; ENVIRONMENTAL QUALITY; POLLUTION; SURVEYS 540320* -- Environment, Aquatic-- Chemicals Monitoring & Transport-- (1990-); 010900 -- Coal, Lignite, & Peat-- Environmental Aspects

Citation Formats

Hirsh, R.M., Alley, W.M., and Wilber, W.G. Summary of the U. S. Geological Survey National Water Quality Assessment Program. United States: N. p., 1988. Web.
Hirsh, R.M., Alley, W.M., & Wilber, W.G. Summary of the U. S. Geological Survey National Water Quality Assessment Program. United States.
Hirsh, R.M., Alley, W.M., and Wilber, W.G. Fri . "Summary of the U. S. Geological Survey National Water Quality Assessment Program". United States. doi:.
@article{osti_5544397,
title = {Summary of the U. S. Geological Survey National Water Quality Assessment Program},
author = {Hirsh, R.M. and Alley, W.M. and Wilber, W.G.},
abstractNote = {Beginning in 1986, the Congress appropriated funds for the US Geological Survey to test and refine concepts for a National Water Quality Assessment Program. At present, the program is in a pilot phase with field studies occurring in seven areas around the Nation. In 1990, a committee of the National Academy of Sciences will complete an evaluation of the design and potential utility of the program. A decision about moving to full-scale implementation will be made upon completion of the evaluation. The program is intended to address a wide range of national water quality issues that include chemical contamination, acidification, eutrophication, salinity, sedimentation, and sanitary quality. The goals of the program are to: (1) provide nationally consistent descriptions of current water quality conditions for a large part of the Nation's water resources; (2) define long-term trends in water quality; and (3) identify and describe the relations of both current conditions and trends in water quality to natural and human factors. This information will be provided to water managers, policy makers, and the public to provide an improved scientific basis for evaluating the effectiveness of water quality management programs and for predicting the likely effects of contemplated changes in land- and water-management practices.},
doi = {},
journal = {},
number = ,
volume = ,
place = {United States},
year = {Fri Jan 01 00:00:00 EST 1988},
month = {Fri Jan 01 00:00:00 EST 1988}
}

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  • During the decade 1974-84, the U.S. Geological Survey and the U.S. Bureau of Land Management cooperated on investigations to collect information and to study hydrologic processes related to development and mining of coal. This report summarizes the major findings and accomplishments that have resulted from data-collection activities, hydrologic studies, and research concerned with the effects of coal miming on water resources.
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  • The US Geological Survey (USGS) maintains a quality assurance program based on the analysis of reference samples for its two water analysis laboratories located in Atlanta, Georgia, and Denver, Colorado. Reference samples containing inorganic constituents are prepared at the USGS Ocala, Florida, office and disguised as routine samples and sent daily to each laboratory through other USGS offices. The results are permanently stored in the National Water Data Storage and Retrieval System (WATSTORE), the USGS data base for all water data. In addition, one sample containing known concentrations of trihalomethanes was analyzed in both laboratories, and these results also aremore » presented. Recurring problems with lack of precision existed in Atlanta for arsenic; calcium (ICP); iron, total recoverable; sodium (ICP); and zinc, total recoverable; and in Denver for chloride; copper, total recoverable; and specific conductance. Significant bias recurred in Atlanta for arsenic; beryllium; fluoride; molybdenum; nickel; potassium; silica; and zinc; and in Denver for antimony; arsenic; barium; cadmium; cadmium, total recoverable; chromium, total recoverable; cobalt; cobalt, total recoverable; dissolved solids; fluoride; magnesium (ICP); molybdenum; nickel; nickel, total recoverable; selenium; silver; silver, total recoverable; sodium (ICP); sodium (AA); specific conductance; sulfate; zinc; and zinc, total recoverable. The quality assurance samples were contaminated with iron during preparation beginning in July, 1981, and continuing through March, 1982. Therefore, no evaluation of iron or iron, total-recoverable data was made for this period. 8 refs., 180 figs., 6 tabs.« less
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