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Title: Immune reactivity after high-dose irradiation

Abstract

Immune reactivity after total-body irradiation was investigated in rats using skin graft rejection as the indicator system. After sublethal irradiation with 10.5 Gy (approximately 50% lethality/6 weeks) the rejection of major histocompatibility complex allogeneic skin grafts was delayed significantly compared with nonirradiated control animals (28 versus 6.5 days). In contrast, skin grafts were rejected after 7.5 days in sublethally irradiated animals and 7 days in lethally irradiated animals if additional skin donor type alloantigens--namely, irradiated bone marrow cells--were given i.v. either simultaneously or with a delay of not more than 24 hr after the above conditioning regimen. These reactions were alloantigen-specific. They were observed in six different strain combinations with varying donors and recipients. Starting on day 2 after irradiation, i.v. injection of bone marrow gradually lost its effectivity and skin grafts were no longer rejected with uniform rapidity; skin donor marrow given on days 4 or 8 did not accelerate skin graft rejection at all. These data show that for approximately 1-2 days after high-dose total-body irradiation rats are still capable of starting a vigorous immune reaction against i.v.-injected alloantigens. The phenomenon of impaired rejection of skin grafted immediately after high-dose irradiation appears to result from the poor accessibilitymore » of skin graft alloantigens during the early postirradiation phase when vascularization of the grafted skin is insufficient.« less

Authors:
; ; ;
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Univ. of Kiel, Germany, F.R.
OSTI Identifier:
5528331
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Resource Relation:
Journal Name: Transplantation; (United States); Journal Volume: 3
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
63 RADIATION, THERMAL, AND OTHER ENVIRON. POLLUTANT EFFECTS ON LIVING ORGS. AND BIOL. MAT.; GRAFT-HOST REACTION; IMMUNOSUPPRESSION; RETICULOENDOTHELIAL SYSTEM; BIOLOGICAL RADIATION EFFECTS; DOSE-RESPONSE RELATIONSHIPS; GRAFTS; IMMUNITY; LETHAL IRRADIATION; RATS; SKIN; SUBLETHAL IRRADIATION; WHOLE-BODY IRRADIATION; ANIMAL TISSUES; ANIMALS; BIOLOGICAL EFFECTS; BODY; EXTERNAL IRRADIATION; IRRADIATION; MAMMALS; ORGANS; RADIATION EFFECTS; RODENTS; TISSUES; TRANSPLANTS; VERTEBRATES; 560152* - Radiation Effects on Animals- Animals

Citation Formats

Gassmann, W., Wottge, H.U., von Kolzynski, M., and Mueller-Ruchholtz, W.. Immune reactivity after high-dose irradiation. United States: N. p., 1986. Web.
Gassmann, W., Wottge, H.U., von Kolzynski, M., & Mueller-Ruchholtz, W.. Immune reactivity after high-dose irradiation. United States.
Gassmann, W., Wottge, H.U., von Kolzynski, M., and Mueller-Ruchholtz, W.. 1986. "Immune reactivity after high-dose irradiation". United States. doi:.
@article{osti_5528331,
title = {Immune reactivity after high-dose irradiation},
author = {Gassmann, W. and Wottge, H.U. and von Kolzynski, M. and Mueller-Ruchholtz, W.},
abstractNote = {Immune reactivity after total-body irradiation was investigated in rats using skin graft rejection as the indicator system. After sublethal irradiation with 10.5 Gy (approximately 50% lethality/6 weeks) the rejection of major histocompatibility complex allogeneic skin grafts was delayed significantly compared with nonirradiated control animals (28 versus 6.5 days). In contrast, skin grafts were rejected after 7.5 days in sublethally irradiated animals and 7 days in lethally irradiated animals if additional skin donor type alloantigens--namely, irradiated bone marrow cells--were given i.v. either simultaneously or with a delay of not more than 24 hr after the above conditioning regimen. These reactions were alloantigen-specific. They were observed in six different strain combinations with varying donors and recipients. Starting on day 2 after irradiation, i.v. injection of bone marrow gradually lost its effectivity and skin grafts were no longer rejected with uniform rapidity; skin donor marrow given on days 4 or 8 did not accelerate skin graft rejection at all. These data show that for approximately 1-2 days after high-dose total-body irradiation rats are still capable of starting a vigorous immune reaction against i.v.-injected alloantigens. The phenomenon of impaired rejection of skin grafted immediately after high-dose irradiation appears to result from the poor accessibility of skin graft alloantigens during the early postirradiation phase when vascularization of the grafted skin is insufficient.},
doi = {},
journal = {Transplantation; (United States)},
number = ,
volume = 3,
place = {United States},
year = 1986,
month = 3
}
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