skip to main content
OSTI.GOV title logo U.S. Department of Energy
Office of Scientific and Technical Information

Title: Weld residual stresses and plastic deformation

Abstract

Residual stresses due to welding can play a primary role in the performance of piping systems and pressure vessels. The stresses are high, in the range of the yield stress of the material, and can influence the fatigue and fracture behavior as well as component service life. Thus, it is important to have an understanding of weld residual stresses. The papers in this section address the important topic of residual stresses and failure analysis. The paper by Boyles reviews computer simulation in the prediction and analysis of fatigue, fracture, and creep of welded structures. The growing use of expert systems for these purposes is also covered. Karisson, et al, determine the deformations and stresses during the butt-welding of a pipe. The determination of residual deformations and stresses is also presented. Oddy, Goldak, and McDill propose a method to incorporate transformation plasticity in a finite element program. A three-dimensional analysis of a short longitudinal pipe weld in a typical pressure vessel steel is presented. Chaaban, Morin, Ma, and Bazergui study the influence of ligament thickness, strain hardening, expansion sequence, and level of applied expansion pressure on the interference fit in a model of a tube-to-tubesheet joint in a heat exchanger. Thismore » section contains papers dealing with models for plastic deformation. Imatani, Teraura, and Inoue formulate a viscoplastic constitutive model based on an anisotropic yield criterion. Comparisons with experimental results obtained using thin walled tubular specimens made from SUS 304 stainless steel show that the present yield criterion adequately accounts for prior deformation history. Niitsu, Horiguchi, and Ikegami investigate the plastic behavior of S25C mild steel tubular specimens subjected to combined axial and torsional loading at both constant and variable temperatures.« less

Authors:
 [1];  [2]
  1. (Tulsa Univ., OK (United States))
  2. (Yokohama National Univ. (Japan))
Publication Date:
OSTI Identifier:
5502004
Alternate Identifier(s):
OSTI ID: 5502004
Report Number(s):
CONF-890721--
ISBN: 0-7918-0325-5
Resource Type:
Conference
Resource Relation:
Conference: Joint ASME/JSME pressure vessel and piping conference, Honolulu, HI (United States), 23-27 Jul 1989
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
36 MATERIALS SCIENCE; 42 ENGINEERING; PRESSURE VESSELS; MATERIALS TESTING; MEETINGS; RESIDUAL STRESSES; STRESS ANALYSIS; WELDED JOINTS; PHASE TRANSFORMATIONS; ANISOTROPY; CREEP; DEFORMATION; ELASTICITY; FINITE ELEMENT METHOD; GASKETS; LEADING ABSTRACT; PIPE JOINTS; PLASTICITY; STAINLESS STEEL-304; THREE-DIMENSIONAL CALCULATIONS; YIELD STRENGTH; ABSTRACTS; ALLOYS; AUSTENITIC STEELS; CHROMIUM ALLOYS; CHROMIUM-NICKEL STEELS; CONTAINERS; CORROSION RESISTANT ALLOYS; DOCUMENT TYPES; HEAT RESISTANT MATERIALS; HEAT RESISTING ALLOYS; HIGH ALLOY STEELS; IRON ALLOYS; IRON BASE ALLOYS; JOINTS; MATERIALS; MECHANICAL PROPERTIES; NICKEL ALLOYS; NUMERICAL SOLUTION; SEALS; STAINLESS STEELS; STEEL-CR19NI10; STEELS; STRESSES; TENSILE PROPERTIES; TESTING 360103* -- Metals & Alloys-- Mechanical Properties; 360101 -- Metals & Alloys-- Preparation & Fabrication; 360102 -- Metals & Alloys-- Structure & Phase Studies; 420205 -- Engineering-- Transport & Storage Facilities-- (1980-)

Citation Formats

Rybicki, E., and Shiratori, M. Weld residual stresses and plastic deformation. United States: N. p., 1989. Web.
Rybicki, E., & Shiratori, M. Weld residual stresses and plastic deformation. United States.
Rybicki, E., and Shiratori, M. Sun . "Weld residual stresses and plastic deformation". United States.
@article{osti_5502004,
title = {Weld residual stresses and plastic deformation},
author = {Rybicki, E. and Shiratori, M.},
abstractNote = {Residual stresses due to welding can play a primary role in the performance of piping systems and pressure vessels. The stresses are high, in the range of the yield stress of the material, and can influence the fatigue and fracture behavior as well as component service life. Thus, it is important to have an understanding of weld residual stresses. The papers in this section address the important topic of residual stresses and failure analysis. The paper by Boyles reviews computer simulation in the prediction and analysis of fatigue, fracture, and creep of welded structures. The growing use of expert systems for these purposes is also covered. Karisson, et al, determine the deformations and stresses during the butt-welding of a pipe. The determination of residual deformations and stresses is also presented. Oddy, Goldak, and McDill propose a method to incorporate transformation plasticity in a finite element program. A three-dimensional analysis of a short longitudinal pipe weld in a typical pressure vessel steel is presented. Chaaban, Morin, Ma, and Bazergui study the influence of ligament thickness, strain hardening, expansion sequence, and level of applied expansion pressure on the interference fit in a model of a tube-to-tubesheet joint in a heat exchanger. This section contains papers dealing with models for plastic deformation. Imatani, Teraura, and Inoue formulate a viscoplastic constitutive model based on an anisotropic yield criterion. Comparisons with experimental results obtained using thin walled tubular specimens made from SUS 304 stainless steel show that the present yield criterion adequately accounts for prior deformation history. Niitsu, Horiguchi, and Ikegami investigate the plastic behavior of S25C mild steel tubular specimens subjected to combined axial and torsional loading at both constant and variable temperatures.},
doi = {},
journal = {},
number = ,
volume = ,
place = {United States},
year = {1989},
month = {1}
}

Conference:
Other availability
Please see Document Availability for additional information on obtaining the full-text document. Library patrons may search WorldCat to identify libraries that hold this conference proceeding.

Save / Share: