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Title: Relative potentials of concentrating and two-axis tracking flat-plate photovoltaic arrays for central-station applications. Issue study

Abstract

The purpose of this study is to assess the relative economic potentials of concentrating and two-axis tracking flat-plate photovoltaic arrays for central-station applications in the mid-1990's. Specific objectives of this study are to provide information on concentrator photovoltaic collector probabilistic price and efficiency levels to illustrate critical areas of R and D for concentrator cells and collectors, and to compare concentrator and flat-plate PV price and efficiency alternatives for several locations, based on their implied costs of energy. To deal with the uncertainties surrounding research and development activities in general, a probabilistic assessment of commercially achievable concentrator photovoltaic collector efficiencies and prices (at the factory loading dock) is performed. The results of this projection of concentrator photovoltaic technology are then compared with a previous flat-plate module price analysis (performed early in 1983). To focus this analysis on specific collector alternatives and their implied energy costs for different locations, similar two-axis tracking designs are assumed for both concentrator and flat-plate options. The results of this study provide the first comprehensive assessment of PV concentrator collector manufacturing costs in combination with those of flat-plate modules, both projected to their commercial potentials in the mid-1990's.

Authors:
;
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Jet Propulsion Lab., Pasadena, CA (USA)
OSTI Identifier:
5501067
Report Number(s):
DOE/ET/20356-22; JPL-85-16
ON: DE85014509
DOE Contract Number:
AI01-76ET20356
Resource Type:
Technical Report
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
14 SOLAR ENERGY; CONCENTRATOR SOLAR CELLS; COST ESTIMATION; SOLAR CELL ARRAYS; COMPUTER CALCULATIONS; EFFICIENCY; PHOTOVOLTAIC POWER PLANTS; PRICES; PROBABILISTIC ESTIMATION; SOLAR CONCENTRATORS; SOLAR TRACKING; DIRECT ENERGY CONVERTERS; EQUIPMENT; PHOTOELECTRIC CELLS; PHOTOVOLTAIC CELLS; POWER PLANTS; SOLAR CELLS; SOLAR EQUIPMENT; SOLAR POWER PLANTS; 140501* - Solar Energy Conversion- Photovoltaic Conversion; 140600 - Solar Energy- Photovoltaic Power Systems

Citation Formats

Borden, C.S., and Schwartz, D.L. Relative potentials of concentrating and two-axis tracking flat-plate photovoltaic arrays for central-station applications. Issue study. United States: N. p., 1984. Web.
Borden, C.S., & Schwartz, D.L. Relative potentials of concentrating and two-axis tracking flat-plate photovoltaic arrays for central-station applications. Issue study. United States.
Borden, C.S., and Schwartz, D.L. Mon . "Relative potentials of concentrating and two-axis tracking flat-plate photovoltaic arrays for central-station applications. Issue study". United States. doi:.
@article{osti_5501067,
title = {Relative potentials of concentrating and two-axis tracking flat-plate photovoltaic arrays for central-station applications. Issue study},
author = {Borden, C.S. and Schwartz, D.L.},
abstractNote = {The purpose of this study is to assess the relative economic potentials of concentrating and two-axis tracking flat-plate photovoltaic arrays for central-station applications in the mid-1990's. Specific objectives of this study are to provide information on concentrator photovoltaic collector probabilistic price and efficiency levels to illustrate critical areas of R and D for concentrator cells and collectors, and to compare concentrator and flat-plate PV price and efficiency alternatives for several locations, based on their implied costs of energy. To deal with the uncertainties surrounding research and development activities in general, a probabilistic assessment of commercially achievable concentrator photovoltaic collector efficiencies and prices (at the factory loading dock) is performed. The results of this projection of concentrator photovoltaic technology are then compared with a previous flat-plate module price analysis (performed early in 1983). To focus this analysis on specific collector alternatives and their implied energy costs for different locations, similar two-axis tracking designs are assumed for both concentrator and flat-plate options. The results of this study provide the first comprehensive assessment of PV concentrator collector manufacturing costs in combination with those of flat-plate modules, both projected to their commercial potentials in the mid-1990's.},
doi = {},
journal = {},
number = ,
volume = ,
place = {United States},
year = {Mon Dec 31 00:00:00 EST 1984},
month = {Mon Dec 31 00:00:00 EST 1984}
}

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