skip to main content
OSTI.GOV title logo U.S. Department of Energy
Office of Scientific and Technical Information

Title: Guidelines for the integration of audio cues into computer user interfaces

Abstract

Throughout the history of computers, vision has been the main channel through which information is conveyed to the computer user. As the complexities of man-machine interactions increase, more and more information must be transferred from the computer to the user and then successfully interpreted by the user. A logical next step in the evolution of the computer-user interface is the incorporation of sound and thereby using the sense of ''hearing'' in the computer experience. This allows our visual and auditory capabilities to work naturally together in unison leading to more effective and efficient interpretation of all information received by the user from the computer. This thesis presents an initial set of guidelines to assist interface developers in designing an effective sight and sound user interface. This study is a synthesis of various aspects of sound, human communication, computer-user interfaces, and psychoacoustics. We introduce the notion of an earcon. Earcons are audio cues used in the computer-user interface to provide information and feedback to the user about some computer object, operation, or interaction. A possible construction technique for earcons, the use of earcons in the interface, how earcons are learned and remembered, and the affects of earcons on their users aremore » investigated. This study takes the point of view that earcons are a language and human/computer communication issue and are therefore analyzed according to the three dimensions of linguistics; syntactics, semantics, and pragmatics.« less

Authors:
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Lawrence Livermore National Lab., CA (USA)
OSTI Identifier:
5475406
Report Number(s):
UCRL-53656
ON: DE85016506
DOE Contract Number:
W-7405-ENG-48
Resource Type:
Technical Report
Resource Relation:
Other Information: Portions of this document are illegible in microfiche products. Original copy available until stock is exhausted. Thesis. Submitted to Univ. of California, Davis
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
99 GENERAL AND MISCELLANEOUS//MATHEMATICS, COMPUTING, AND INFORMATION SCIENCE; COMPUTERS; AUDITORY ORGANS; EQUIPMENT INTERFACES; ACOUSTIC MEASUREMENTS; SPEECH; BODY; ORGANS; SENSE ORGANS; 990200* - Mathematics & Computers

Citation Formats

Sumikawa, D.A. Guidelines for the integration of audio cues into computer user interfaces. United States: N. p., 1985. Web.
Sumikawa, D.A. Guidelines for the integration of audio cues into computer user interfaces. United States.
Sumikawa, D.A. 1985. "Guidelines for the integration of audio cues into computer user interfaces". United States. doi:.
@article{osti_5475406,
title = {Guidelines for the integration of audio cues into computer user interfaces},
author = {Sumikawa, D.A.},
abstractNote = {Throughout the history of computers, vision has been the main channel through which information is conveyed to the computer user. As the complexities of man-machine interactions increase, more and more information must be transferred from the computer to the user and then successfully interpreted by the user. A logical next step in the evolution of the computer-user interface is the incorporation of sound and thereby using the sense of ''hearing'' in the computer experience. This allows our visual and auditory capabilities to work naturally together in unison leading to more effective and efficient interpretation of all information received by the user from the computer. This thesis presents an initial set of guidelines to assist interface developers in designing an effective sight and sound user interface. This study is a synthesis of various aspects of sound, human communication, computer-user interfaces, and psychoacoustics. We introduce the notion of an earcon. Earcons are audio cues used in the computer-user interface to provide information and feedback to the user about some computer object, operation, or interaction. A possible construction technique for earcons, the use of earcons in the interface, how earcons are learned and remembered, and the affects of earcons on their users are investigated. This study takes the point of view that earcons are a language and human/computer communication issue and are therefore analyzed according to the three dimensions of linguistics; syntactics, semantics, and pragmatics.},
doi = {},
journal = {},
number = ,
volume = ,
place = {United States},
year = 1985,
month = 6
}

Technical Report:
Other availability
Please see Document Availability for additional information on obtaining the full-text document. Library patrons may search WorldCat to identify libraries that may hold this item. Keep in mind that many technical reports are not cataloged in WorldCat.

Save / Share:
  • Earcons are audio cues used in the computer/user interface to provide information and feedback to the user about computer entities. (Earcons include messages and functions, as well as states and labels.) Design guidelines are presented for the syntax of earcons. Earcons are constructed from pitches, rhythms, and motives, short sequences of notes with a specific rhythm and pitch, embellished by timbre, dynamics, and register. Compound earcons and family earcons are introduced. These are related motives that serve to identify a family of related cues. Examples of earcons are given. 18 refs., 4 figs., 1 tab.
  • A logical next step in the evolution of the computer/user interface is the incorporation of sound, thereby using the sense of hearing in our communication with the computer. This allows our visual and auditory capacities to work in unison, which produces a more effective and efficient interpretation of information received from the computer than sight alone. In this paper we examine earcons, which are audio cues used in the computer/user interface to provide information and feedback to the user about computer entities. (Earcons include messages and functions, as well as states and labels.) Here we present design guidelines for themore » syntax of earcons. Earcons are constructed from pitches, rhythms, and motives, short sequences of notes with a specific rhythm and pitch, embellished by timbre, dynamics, and register. Compound earcons and family earcons are introduced. These are related motives that serve to identify a family of related cues. Examples of earcons are given. 18 refs.« less
  • A logical next step in the evolution of the computer-user interface is the incorporation of sound thereby using our senses of ''hearing'' in our communication with the computer. This allows our visual and auditory capacities to work in unison leading to a more effective and efficient interpretation of information received from the computer than by sight alone. In this paper we examine earcons, which are audio cues, used in the computer-user interface to provide information and feedback to the user about computer entities (these include messages and functions, as well as states and labels). The material in this paper ismore » part of a larger study that recommends guidelines for the design and use of audio cues in the computer-user interface. The complete work examines the disciplines of music, psychology, communication theory, advertising, and psychoacoustics to discover how sound is utilized and analyzed in those areas. The resulting information is organized according to the theory of semiotics, the theory of signs, into the syntax, semantics, and pragmatics of communication by sound. Here we present design guidelines for the syntax of earcons. Earcons are constructed from motives, short sequences of notes with a specific rhythm and pitch, embellished by timbre, dynamics, and register. Compound earcons and family earcons are introduced. These are related motives that serve to identify a family of related cues. Examples of earcons are given.« less
  • This standard provides guidelines for accommodating user needs in preparing computer programs for scientific and engineering applications. Adherence to these guidelines will help ensure proper application and simplify the use of the computer program. The intent is to encourage the development of a product that will be easy to apply correctly.
  • Key elements of the Standard for the Exchange of Product Model Data (STEP) development processes include the qualification process, the integration process, and the application interpretation process. The combination of integration and application interpretation provides a data communication capability which accommodates product data applications in a consistent manner and ensures the utility of specific applications. The speaker presents an overview of the resource model integration and the application interpretation processes. These development methods and processes themselves have been developed as part of the Product Data Exchange using STEP (PDES)/STEP effort. They can be used generically to facilitate enterprise integration activities.