skip to main content
OSTI.GOV title logo U.S. Department of Energy
Office of Scientific and Technical Information

Title: High temperature corrosion of engineering alloys

Abstract

This book describes a treatment of all forms of high temperature corrosion problems encountered in industry, especially gas turbine and aerospace; heat treating; mineral and metallurgical processing; ceramic, electronic and glass manufacturing; automotive; pulp and paper; waste incineration; fossil fuel power generation; coal gasification; and nuclear. Materials problems discussed include those due to oxidation, carburization and metal dusting, nitridation, halogen corrosion, sulfidation, ash/salt deposit corrosion, molten salt corrosion, and molten metal corrosion.

Authors:
Publication Date:
OSTI Identifier:
5465166
Resource Type:
Book
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
36 MATERIALS SCIENCE; FOSSIL-FUEL POWER PLANTS; METALS; CORROSION; AEROSPACE INDUSTRY; AUTOMOBILES; CARBURIZATION; CERAMICS; COAL GASIFICATION; GAS TURBINES; HALOGENS; HEAT TREATMENTS; MANUFACTURING; METALLURGY; MINERALS; NUCLEAR POWER PLANTS; OXIDATION; PAPER INDUSTRY; PROCESSING; SULFIDATION; WASTE PROCESSING; CHEMICAL REACTIONS; ELEMENTS; EQUIPMENT; GASIFICATION; HARDENING; INDUSTRY; MACHINERY; MANAGEMENT; NONMETALS; NUCLEAR FACILITIES; POWER PLANTS; SURFACE HARDENING; SURFACE TREATMENTS; THERMAL POWER PLANTS; THERMOCHEMICAL PROCESSES; TURBINES; TURBOMACHINERY; VEHICLES; WASTE MANAGEMENT; WOOD PRODUCTS INDUSTRY 360105* -- Metals & Alloys-- Corrosion & Erosion

Citation Formats

Lai, G.Y. High temperature corrosion of engineering alloys. United States: N. p., 1990. Web.
Lai, G.Y. High temperature corrosion of engineering alloys. United States.
Lai, G.Y. 1990. "High temperature corrosion of engineering alloys". United States. doi:.
@article{osti_5465166,
title = {High temperature corrosion of engineering alloys},
author = {Lai, G.Y.},
abstractNote = {This book describes a treatment of all forms of high temperature corrosion problems encountered in industry, especially gas turbine and aerospace; heat treating; mineral and metallurgical processing; ceramic, electronic and glass manufacturing; automotive; pulp and paper; waste incineration; fossil fuel power generation; coal gasification; and nuclear. Materials problems discussed include those due to oxidation, carburization and metal dusting, nitridation, halogen corrosion, sulfidation, ash/salt deposit corrosion, molten salt corrosion, and molten metal corrosion.},
doi = {},
journal = {},
number = ,
volume = ,
place = {United States},
year = 1990,
month = 1
}

Book:
Other availability
Please see Document Availability for additional information on obtaining the full-text document. Library patrons may search WorldCat to identify libraries that hold this book.

Save / Share:
  • Corrosive deposits containing high amounts of alkali sulphates, chlorides and/or carbonates are encountered by heat exchanger tubes in a variety of industrial processes. Due to their low melting point the alkali salts can cause basic or acidic dissolution of the subjacent material, which results in rapid wastage of the tube. In order to select appropriate materials for application in heat recovery systems eight commercial high temperature materials (alloy 800H, Alloy 31, Alloy AC66, alloy 45-TM, Alloy 625, Alloy 59 and Alloy C-4) were investigated in sulphate, sulphate/chloride and sulphate/chloride/carbonate salt mixtures. The temperature range was between 550 and 750 C.more » In agreement with field tests the corrosion attack was high for most of the alloys tested with the corrosion rate depending sensitively on salt composition, test temperature and alloy composition. High molybdenum contents were found to be detrimental. Chromium did not effect the corrosion behavior significantly, whereas silicon had a beneficial effect on the corrosion resistance in molten alkali salts.« less
  • In a laboratory burner rig facility developed by Krupp VDM, the corrosion behavior of three high-temperature alloys was investigated under high velocity burnt fuel. A hot gas stream of burnt natural gas hits a sample at an angle of 45{degree}. Gas velocities of up to 80 m/s are obtained, and can be continuously adjusted by varying the air volume. By changing the sample to burner nozzle distance, a temperature gradient from 1,000 C in the center to 880 C at the edges of the sample can be achieved. Corrosion behavior of the two Fe-base alloys 310 S and 800H, andmore » the Ni-base alloy 602CA, was evaluated by means of optical microscopy and SEM/EDAX analysis. According to results obtained so far, the alumina-former, alloy 602CA, provides best performance under high velocity burnt fuel at 880--1,000 C, as well as under steady state cyclic oxidation testing in air.« less
  • The corrosion behavior of a Ni{sub 3}Al-15at%Fe alloy has been studied in air and melted salts, and also that of Ni{sub 3}Al alloys contained series boron in melted salts. The first alloy has two oxidation rate constants. Its initial oxidation activity energy is 319 kJ/mol. There was much FeAl{sub 2}O{sub 4} formed at 950 C, which possessed better oxidation resistance than NiFe{sub 2}O{sub 4}, therefore the alloy had the best oxidation resistance at 950 C. It also had better sulfidation resistance than 00Cr19Ni11Ti stainless steel at 850 C , but the alloy was sulfidized seriously at 950 C. The sulfidesmore » were FeS{sub 2} at 950 C. There were different initial oxides formed, which were Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4} at 850 C, and mixture oxides of NiO,NiMoO{sub 4}, Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} and NiAl{sub 2}O{sub 4} at 950 C, respectively. The Ni{sub 3}Al alloys with boron contents from 0 to 3.7at% had better sulfidation resistance than the stainless steel at 850 C, and the alloy with 1.37at%B was the best. The sulfides were the same in the boron containing Ni{sub 3}Al alloys which were Al{sub 2}S{sub 3} and Ni{sub 7}S{sub 6}.« less
  • Although material wastage by combined erosion-corrosion attack is well-known in a variety of commercial high-temperature processes like coal gasifiers, stationary and flying gas turbines, fluidized bed combustion, industrial furnaces and other high-temperature heat-treatment furnaces, less information is available on material-related parameters and low velocity environments typical for industrial furnaces. Consequently the aim of the present paper is to introduce a newly developed erosion-corrosion testing facility enabling investigations in a wide range of velocities and to provide first test results on the influence of alloying elements with special emphasis on the oxide forming elements like chromium, aluminum and silicon on erosion-corrosionmore » resistance. Six alloys 600H, 690, 800H, 602CA, 45TM and Ni{sub 3}Al were tested in order to find a ranking in the combined erosion-corrosion environment. The experimental test results reveal that the mechanism of metal degradation under combined erosion-corrosion attack at low particle velocities is dominated by metal wastage by removal of oxide scales with subsequent regrowth by oxidation. The resistance of the alloys against erosion-corrosion increased with increasing aluminum content. Independent of the particle velocities, the nickel aluminide showed the best performance followed by alloy 602CA and the iron-base alloy 800H.« less
  • Intergranular stress corrosion cracking (IGSCC) of sensitized stainless steel (SS) components in boiling water reactors (BWRs) is known to be a major concern. There the effect of Pd or Pt additions to various alloys on the corrosion potential behavior was investigated in 288 C water containing various amounts of oxygen, hydrogen, and hydrogen peroxide. The data showed that the noble-metal alloying additions to engineering materials improved the catalytic efficiency for the recombination of oxygen and hydrogen on the surface and thereby lowered the corrosion potential for IGSCC protection when the molar ratio of hydrogen to oxygen in water is greatermore » than about 2.« less