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Title: Phosphatidylinositol 4,5-bisphosphate competitively inhibits phorbol ester binding to protein kinase C

Abstract

Calcium phospholipid dependent protein kinase C (PKC) is activated by diacylglycerol (DG) and by phorbol esters and is recognized to be the phorbol ester receptor of cells; DG displaces phorbol ester competitively from PKC. A phospholipid, phosphatidylinositol 4,5-bisphosphate (PIP{sub 2}), can also activate PKC in the presence of phosphatidylserine (PS) and Ca{sup 2+} with a K{sub PIP{sub 2}} of 0.04 mol %. Preliminary experiments have suggested a common binding site for PIP{sub 2} and DG on PKC. Here, the authors investigate the effect of PIP{sub 2} on phorbol ester binding to PKC in a mixed micellar assay. In the presence of 20 mol % PS, PIP{sub 2} inhibited specific binding of ({sup 3}H)phorbol 12,13-dibutyrate (PDBu) in a dose-dependent fashion up to 85% at 1 mol %. Inhibition of binding was more pronounced with PIP{sub 2} than with DG. Scatchard analysis indicated that the decrease in binding of PDBu in the presence of PIP{sub 2} is the result of an altered affinity for the phorbol ester rather than of a change in maximal binding. The plot of apparent dissociation constants (K{sub d{prime}}) against PIP{sub 2} concentration was linear over a range of 0.01-1 mol % with a K{sub i} of 0.043more » mol % and confirmed the competitive nature of inhibition between PDBu and PIP{sub 2}. Competition between PIP{sub 2} and phorbol ester could be determined in a liposomal assay system also. These results indicate that PIP{sub 2}, DG, and phorbol ester all compete for the same activator-receiving region on the regulatory moiety of protein kinase C, and they lend support to the suggestion that PIP{sub 2} is a primary activator of the enzyme.« less

Authors:
; ; ;  [1]
  1. (New York State Office of Mental Retardation and Developmental Disabilities, Staten Island (USA))
Publication Date:
OSTI Identifier:
5443476
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Resource Relation:
Journal Name: Biochemistry; (USA); Journal Volume: 28:12
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
59 BASIC BIOLOGICAL SCIENCES; ENZYME INDUCTION; INHIBITION; PHORBOL ESTERS; BIOLOGICAL EFFECTS; PHOSPHOTRANSFERASES; BIOCHEMICAL REACTION KINETICS; INOSITOLS; PHOSPHONIC ACID ESTERS; TRITIUM COMPOUNDS; CARBOHYDRATES; CARCINOGENS; ENZYMES; ESTERS; GENE REGULATION; HYDROGEN COMPOUNDS; KINETICS; MONOSACCHARIDES; ORGANIC COMPOUNDS; ORGANIC PHOSPHORUS COMPOUNDS; PHOSPHORUS-GROUP TRANSFERASES; REACTION KINETICS; SACCHARIDES; TRANSFERASES; 550201* - Biochemistry- Tracer Techniques

Citation Formats

Chauhan, A., Cauhan, V.P.S., Deshmukh, D.S., and Brokerhoff, H. Phosphatidylinositol 4,5-bisphosphate competitively inhibits phorbol ester binding to protein kinase C. United States: N. p., 1989. Web. doi:10.1021/bi00438a007.
Chauhan, A., Cauhan, V.P.S., Deshmukh, D.S., & Brokerhoff, H. Phosphatidylinositol 4,5-bisphosphate competitively inhibits phorbol ester binding to protein kinase C. United States. doi:10.1021/bi00438a007.
Chauhan, A., Cauhan, V.P.S., Deshmukh, D.S., and Brokerhoff, H. 1989. "Phosphatidylinositol 4,5-bisphosphate competitively inhibits phorbol ester binding to protein kinase C". United States. doi:10.1021/bi00438a007.
@article{osti_5443476,
title = {Phosphatidylinositol 4,5-bisphosphate competitively inhibits phorbol ester binding to protein kinase C},
author = {Chauhan, A. and Cauhan, V.P.S. and Deshmukh, D.S. and Brokerhoff, H.},
abstractNote = {Calcium phospholipid dependent protein kinase C (PKC) is activated by diacylglycerol (DG) and by phorbol esters and is recognized to be the phorbol ester receptor of cells; DG displaces phorbol ester competitively from PKC. A phospholipid, phosphatidylinositol 4,5-bisphosphate (PIP{sub 2}), can also activate PKC in the presence of phosphatidylserine (PS) and Ca{sup 2+} with a K{sub PIP{sub 2}} of 0.04 mol %. Preliminary experiments have suggested a common binding site for PIP{sub 2} and DG on PKC. Here, the authors investigate the effect of PIP{sub 2} on phorbol ester binding to PKC in a mixed micellar assay. In the presence of 20 mol % PS, PIP{sub 2} inhibited specific binding of ({sup 3}H)phorbol 12,13-dibutyrate (PDBu) in a dose-dependent fashion up to 85% at 1 mol %. Inhibition of binding was more pronounced with PIP{sub 2} than with DG. Scatchard analysis indicated that the decrease in binding of PDBu in the presence of PIP{sub 2} is the result of an altered affinity for the phorbol ester rather than of a change in maximal binding. The plot of apparent dissociation constants (K{sub d{prime}}) against PIP{sub 2} concentration was linear over a range of 0.01-1 mol % with a K{sub i} of 0.043 mol % and confirmed the competitive nature of inhibition between PDBu and PIP{sub 2}. Competition between PIP{sub 2} and phorbol ester could be determined in a liposomal assay system also. These results indicate that PIP{sub 2}, DG, and phorbol ester all compete for the same activator-receiving region on the regulatory moiety of protein kinase C, and they lend support to the suggestion that PIP{sub 2} is a primary activator of the enzyme.},
doi = {10.1021/bi00438a007},
journal = {Biochemistry; (USA)},
number = ,
volume = 28:12,
place = {United States},
year = 1989,
month = 6
}
  • The type II{sub {beta}} regulatory subunit of cAMP-dependent protein kinase (RII{sub {beta}}) has been hypothesized to play an important role in the growth inhibition and differentiation induced by site-selective cAMP analogs in human cancer cells, but direct proof of this function has been lacking. To address this tissue, HL-60 human promyelocytic leukemia cells were exposed to RII{sub {beta}} antisense synthetic oligodeoxynucleotide, and the effects on cAMP-induced growth regulation were examined. Exposure of these cells to RII{sub {beta}} antisense oligodeoxynucleotide resulted in a decrease in cAMP analog-induced growth inhibition and differentiation without apparent effect on differentiation induced by phorbol esters. Thismore » loss in cAMP growth regulatory function correlated with a decrease in basal and induced levels of RII{sub {beta}} protein. Exposure to RII{sub {beta}} sense, RI{sub {alpha}} and RII{sub {alpha}} antisense, or irrelevant oligodeoxynucleotides had no such effect. These results show that the RII{sub {beta}} regulatory subunit of protein kinase plays a critical role in the cAMP-induced growth regulation of HL-60 leukemia cells.« less
  • Tryptic fragments of protein kinase C containing the kinase (45 KDa) and phorbol ester-binding activity (38 KDa) were separated by Mono O column chromatography. The purified phorbol ester-binding fragment exhibits a higher affinity for phosphatidylserine than the native enzyme but comparable Kd for (/sup 3/H)phorbol 12,13-dibutyrate as the native enzyme. This proteolytic fragment binds phorbol ester equally efficient either in the presence or absence of Ca/sup 2 +/ and the addition of the kinase fragment did not restore the Ca/sup 2 +/-requirement for the binding. These results indicate that protein kinase C is composed of two functionally distinct units whichmore » can be expressed independently after limited proteolysis with trypsin.« less
  • When washed human platelets were disrupted by sonication in the presence of ethylene glycol bis(beta-aminoethyl ether)-N,N,N',N'-tetraacetic acid, both the catalytic and (/sup 3/H)phorbol-12,13-dibutyrate (PDBu)-binding activities of protein kinase C were recovered in the soluble fraction and were not separable from each other upon several column chromatographies. Platelet protein kinase C required diacylglycerol, Ca2+, and phospholipid for its activation and showed a molecular weight of about 87,000 as estimated by gel filtration analysis. However, when platelets were first incubated with 2 microM Ca2+-ionophore A23187 for 5 min at 37 degrees C in the medium containing 3 mM CaCl/sub 2/ and thenmore » disrupted under the same conditions, the catalytic and (/sup 3/H)phorbol-12,13-dibutyrate-binding activities were separately recovered in the soluble and particulate fractions, respectively; moreover, the catalytic activity recovered in the soluble fraction became independent of diacylglycerol, Ca2+, and phospholipid, and showed a molecular weight of about 50,000 as estimated by gel filtration analysis. The kinetic properties of this Mr 50,000 enzyme were similar to those of the catalytic fragment of rat brain protein kinase C described previously. In a cell-free system, digestion with trypsin of protein kinase C highly purified from rat brain caused the generation of a fragment which had no catalytic activity but showed full (/sup 3/H)phorbol-12,13-dibutyrate-binding activity. The molecular weight of this fragment was estimated to be about 35,000 by sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis. These results indicate that protein kinase C consists of at least two functionally different domains, a hydrophobic phorbol ester- or diacylglycerol-binding and hydrophilic catalytic domains.« less
  • Normal keratinocytes, SV40-transformed keratinocytes (SVK{sub 14}), and various squamous carcinoma cell (SCC) lines have been used as an in vitro model system to study the properties of phorbol ester receptor and protein kinase C expression during keratinocyte differentiation. The cell lines used exhibit a decreasing capacity to differentiate; moreover, all cell lines respond to a low external Ca{sup 2+} concentration by a decreased capacity to differentiate. Normal keratinocytes exhibited the highest number of phorbol ester receptors as compared to the other cell lines, while each individual cell line exhibited a higher number of phorbol ester receptors during growth under normalmore » Ca{sup 2+} conditions as compared to cells grown under low Ca{sup 2+} conditions. The apparent dissociation constant (K{sub d}) demonstrated only small variations in the various cell lines. These studies revealed differences between protein kinase C properties from the two cell lines grown under normal and low Ca{sup 2+} conditions. The differences included the effect of phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate (PMA) on the redistribution pattern of protein kinase C between the cytoplasmic and particulate fractions as well as the activating effect of diolein in vitro on protein kinase C activity. These observations demonstrate that the functional protein kinase C activity of keratinocytes is determined by various endogenous and exogenous activators and that these activators are modulated differently in various cell lines, under various growth conditions (low Ca{sup 2+} versus normal Ca{sup 2+}).« less
  • Protein kinase C normally has a tandem repeat of a characteristic cysteine-rich sequence in C{sub 1}, the conserved region of the regulatory domain. These sequences resemble the DNA-binding zinc finger domain. For the {gamma} subspecies of rat brain protein kinase C, various deletion and point mutants in this domain were constructed, and the mutated proteins were expressed in Escherichia coli by using the T7 expression system. Radioactive phorbol 12,13-dibutyrate binding analysis indicated that a cysteine-rich zinc-finger-like sequence was essential for protein kinase C to bind phorbol ester and that one of the two sequences was sufficient for the phorbol estermore » binding. Conserved region C{sub 2}, another region in the regulatory domain, was apparently needed for the enzyme to require Ca{sup 2+} for phorbol ester binding activity.« less