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Title: Oral verrucous carcinoma. Treatment with radiotherapy

Abstract

Fifty-two cases of oral verrucous carcinoma treated with radiotherapy at the Regional Cancer Centre, Trivandrum, Kerala, India in 1982 were evaluated to determine the distribution within the oral cavity, clinical extent, and effectiveness of radiotherapy in controlling the disease. The most common site was the buccal mucosa. Fifty percent of the patients had clinically negative regional lymph nodes and 33% were in earlier stages (T1, T2, N0, and M0). The overall 3-year no evidence of disease (NED) survival rate was 44%. The 3-year NED survival rate with radium implant was 86%. We cannot comment on anaplastic transformation after radiotherapy because our treatment failures have not been subjected for biopsy concerning this matter. Because the results are comparable with those of well-differentiated squamous cell carcinoma, we think that the treatment policies advocated for oral squamous cell carcinoma are also applicable to oral verrucous carcinoma.

Authors:
; ; ;
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Medical College Campus, Trivandrum, Kerala (India)
OSTI Identifier:
5442524
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Resource Relation:
Journal Name: Cancer (Philadelphia); (United States); Journal Volume: 61:3
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
62 RADIOLOGY AND NUCLEAR MEDICINE; CARCINOMAS; RADIOTHERAPY; ORAL CAVITY; DOSE-RESPONSE RELATIONSHIPS; INDIA; PATIENTS; RADIATION SOURCE IMPLANTS; RADIUM; SURVIVAL CURVES; ALKALINE EARTH METALS; ASIA; DEVELOPING COUNTRIES; DIGESTIVE SYSTEM; DISEASES; ELEMENTS; IMPLANTS; MEDICINE; METALS; NEOPLASMS; NUCLEAR MEDICINE; RADIATION SOURCES; RADIOLOGY; THERAPY; 550604* - Medicine- Unsealed Radionuclides in Therapy- (1980-)

Citation Formats

Nair, M.K., Sankaranarayanan, R., Padmanabhan, T.K., and Madhu, C.S. Oral verrucous carcinoma. Treatment with radiotherapy. United States: N. p., 1988. Web. doi:10.1002/1097-0142(19880201)61:3<458::AID-CNCR2820610309>3.0.CO;2-T.
Nair, M.K., Sankaranarayanan, R., Padmanabhan, T.K., & Madhu, C.S. Oral verrucous carcinoma. Treatment with radiotherapy. United States. doi:10.1002/1097-0142(19880201)61:3<458::AID-CNCR2820610309>3.0.CO;2-T.
Nair, M.K., Sankaranarayanan, R., Padmanabhan, T.K., and Madhu, C.S. 1988. "Oral verrucous carcinoma. Treatment with radiotherapy". United States. doi:10.1002/1097-0142(19880201)61:3<458::AID-CNCR2820610309>3.0.CO;2-T.
@article{osti_5442524,
title = {Oral verrucous carcinoma. Treatment with radiotherapy},
author = {Nair, M.K. and Sankaranarayanan, R. and Padmanabhan, T.K. and Madhu, C.S.},
abstractNote = {Fifty-two cases of oral verrucous carcinoma treated with radiotherapy at the Regional Cancer Centre, Trivandrum, Kerala, India in 1982 were evaluated to determine the distribution within the oral cavity, clinical extent, and effectiveness of radiotherapy in controlling the disease. The most common site was the buccal mucosa. Fifty percent of the patients had clinically negative regional lymph nodes and 33% were in earlier stages (T1, T2, N0, and M0). The overall 3-year no evidence of disease (NED) survival rate was 44%. The 3-year NED survival rate with radium implant was 86%. We cannot comment on anaplastic transformation after radiotherapy because our treatment failures have not been subjected for biopsy concerning this matter. Because the results are comparable with those of well-differentiated squamous cell carcinoma, we think that the treatment policies advocated for oral squamous cell carcinoma are also applicable to oral verrucous carcinoma.},
doi = {10.1002/1097-0142(19880201)61:3<458::AID-CNCR2820610309>3.0.CO;2-T},
journal = {Cancer (Philadelphia); (United States)},
number = ,
volume = 61:3,
place = {United States},
year = 1988,
month = 2
}
  • Purpose: The role of primary radiotherapy (RT) for laryngeal verrucous carcinoma (LVC) is controversial because of concerns about anaplastic transformation, an increased incidence of metastases, and poorer local control after RT. To address these concerns, we report our experience. Methods and Materials: All patients with pathologically diagnosed LVC treated with primary RT at our institution between 1961 and 2004 were reviewed. The local control, overall survival, and disease-specific survival rate were established. The outcome after salvage treatment and the incidence of metastases and anaplastic transformation were determined. Results: Of 62 LVC patients with a minimal follow-up of 2 years, 20more » local and 1 nodal recurrence were identified. Salvage surgery was undertaken in 18 of the 21 patients, and disease control was achieved in 17; the eighteenth patient died of a complication after surgery. Ultimate laryngeal preservation was achieved in 50 patients (81%), including 42 after initial RT and an additional 8 after salvage surgery. Distant failure and anaplastic transformation were not observed. Second cancers after RT were identified in 4 patients, only 1 of which was a head-and-neck cancer detected 11 years later. Of the 39 deceased patients, only 3 died of LVC. The local control, overall survival, and disease-specific survival rate at 5 years was 66% (95% confidence interval, 52-77%), 87% (95% confidence interval, 75-93%), and 97% (95% confidence interval, 87-99%), respectively. Conclusion: The results of our study have shown that the initial control of LVC with RT is less reliable compared with reports from surgical series; however, local recurrence was almost always salvaged successfully, resulting in disease-specific survival rates equivalent to those of surgical series. Neither anaplastic transformation nor unusual metastasis development was observed in this series.« less
  • The histologic appearance, locoregional recurrence, and rate/site of metastases of spontaneous feline oral squamous cell carcinoma are similar to head and neck cancer in humans. A feasibility study of intratumoral Etanidazole, a hypoxic cell sensitizer, and radiation therapy were instituted in this model. Eleven cats with feline squamous cell carcinoma were treated with intratumoral Etanidazole and radiation therapy. Total Etanidazole doses were 1.5-24.0 gms/m2 (0.5-6.9 gms). The tumor partial response rate was 100% (11/11); the median volume regression was 70%. All cats have died as a result of tumor recurrence or tumor-related complications. Median survival was 116 days. Ten catsmore » have been autopsied. Non-necrotic and necrotic tumor cells were identified at the treatment site in all cats. Pharmacokinetic studies were performed in six cats. Following intravenous infusion, the plasma elimination of the Etanidazole was biexponential. The systemic availability following intratumoral administration was 61.2 +/- 21.1%. Peak plasma Etanidazole levels were observed 14 minutes following intratumoral injection, after which elimination was biexponential. Thirty minutes following intratumoral Etanidazole administration, tumor Etanidazole levels were 62.8% of plasma levels. Feline squamous cell carcinoma appears to be a useful model of human head and neck cancer. Cats tolerate substantial doses of intratumoral and intravenous Etanidazole. Etanidazole and radiation therapy cause rapid regression, but not cure, of feline squamous cell carcinoma. There is a similarity between the intravenous kinetics of Etanidazole in humans and cats. Further studies in this model are planned.« less