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Title: Chernobyl: What really happened

Abstract

The author conducted interviews with Western analysts to reach a consensus view of the accident in 1986 at Chernobyl. This view is illustrated in this article. The Chernobyl RBMK reactor is described, as are the events surrounding the accident. Post-accident safety measures taken by the U.S.S.R. are discussed and critiques. Implications of the Chernobyl accident on RBMK reactor safety and on Soviet nuclear energy management capabilities are also addressed.

Authors:
 [1]
  1. (Atomic Energy, Proliferation and Arms Race (US))
Publication Date:
OSTI Identifier:
5432219
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Resource Relation:
Journal Name: Technology Review; (USA); Journal Volume: 92:5
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
22 GENERAL STUDIES OF NUCLEAR REACTORS; REACTOR ACCIDENTS; REACTOR SAFETY; EVALUATION; NUCLEAR ENERGY; USSR; ACCIDENTS; ASIA; ENERGY; EUROPE; SAFETY; 220900* - Nuclear Reactor Technology- Reactor Safety

Citation Formats

Sweet, W. Chernobyl: What really happened. United States: N. p., 1989. Web.
Sweet, W. Chernobyl: What really happened. United States.
Sweet, W. 1989. "Chernobyl: What really happened". United States. doi:.
@article{osti_5432219,
title = {Chernobyl: What really happened},
author = {Sweet, W.},
abstractNote = {The author conducted interviews with Western analysts to reach a consensus view of the accident in 1986 at Chernobyl. This view is illustrated in this article. The Chernobyl RBMK reactor is described, as are the events surrounding the accident. Post-accident safety measures taken by the U.S.S.R. are discussed and critiques. Implications of the Chernobyl accident on RBMK reactor safety and on Soviet nuclear energy management capabilities are also addressed.},
doi = {},
journal = {Technology Review; (USA)},
number = ,
volume = 92:5,
place = {United States},
year = 1989,
month = 7
}
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