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Title: Analysis of human muscle extracts by proton NMR

Abstract

Perchloric acid extracts were prepared from pooled human muscle biopsies from patients diagnosed with scoliosis (SCOL) and cerebral palsy (CP). After neutralization with KOH and removal of perchlorate, the extracts were concentrated by freeze drying and dissolved in /sup 2/H/sub 2/O to contain 120 O.D. units at 280 nm per 0.5 ml. /sup 1/H NMR spectroscopy was performed with the 5 mm probe of a Varian XL300 instrument. Creatine, lactate, carnosine, and choline were the major resonances in the one-dimensional spectra of both extracts. With creatine as reference, 2.5-fold more lactate was found in SCOL than in CP, and a much smaller difference was also found in their carnosine content. Two-dimensional COSY comparison revealed several differences between the two extracts. Taurine, N-acetyl glutamate, glycerophosphoryl choline (or phosphoryl choline) and an unidentified spot were present only in the extract from SCOL but not in that from CP. On the other hand, aspartate, hydroxy-proline, carnitine and glycerophosphoryl ethanolamine were only present in CP but absent in SCOL. Alanine, cysteine, lysine and arginine appeared in both extracts without an apparent intensity difference.

Authors:
; ;
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Univ. of Illinois, Chicago
OSTI Identifier:
5391726
Report Number(s):
CONF-8604222-
Journal ID: CODEN: FEPRA; TRN: 86-028448
Resource Type:
Conference
Resource Relation:
Journal Name: Fed. Proc., Fed. Am. Soc. Exp. Biol.; (United States); Journal Volume: 45:3; Conference: 70. annual meeting of the Federation of American Society for Experimental Biology, St. Louis, MO, USA, 13 Apr 1986
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
62 RADIOLOGY AND NUCLEAR MEDICINE; 59 BASIC BIOLOGICAL SCIENCES; MUSCLES; NMR SPECTRA; CHOLINE; CREATINE; DEUTERIUM; LACTIC ACID; NUCLEAR MAGNETIC RESONANCE; TRACER TECHNIQUES; WATER; ALCOHOLS; AMINES; AMINO ACIDS; AMMONIUM COMPOUNDS; CARBOXYLIC ACIDS; DRUGS; HYDROGEN COMPOUNDS; HYDROGEN ISOTOPES; HYDROXY ACIDS; HYDROXY COMPOUNDS; ISOTOPE APPLICATIONS; ISOTOPES; LIGHT NUCLEI; LIPOTROPIC FACTORS; MAGNETIC RESONANCE; NUCLEI; ODD-ODD NUCLEI; ORGANIC ACIDS; ORGANIC COMPOUNDS; OXYGEN COMPOUNDS; QUATERNARY COMPOUNDS; RESONANCE; SPECTRA; STABLE ISOTOPES; 550600* - Medicine; 550201 - Biochemistry- Tracer Techniques

Citation Formats

Venkatasubramanian, P.N., Barany, M., and Arus, C. Analysis of human muscle extracts by proton NMR. United States: N. p., 1986. Web.
Venkatasubramanian, P.N., Barany, M., & Arus, C. Analysis of human muscle extracts by proton NMR. United States.
Venkatasubramanian, P.N., Barany, M., and Arus, C. 1986. "Analysis of human muscle extracts by proton NMR". United States. doi:.
@article{osti_5391726,
title = {Analysis of human muscle extracts by proton NMR},
author = {Venkatasubramanian, P.N. and Barany, M. and Arus, C.},
abstractNote = {Perchloric acid extracts were prepared from pooled human muscle biopsies from patients diagnosed with scoliosis (SCOL) and cerebral palsy (CP). After neutralization with KOH and removal of perchlorate, the extracts were concentrated by freeze drying and dissolved in /sup 2/H/sub 2/O to contain 120 O.D. units at 280 nm per 0.5 ml. /sup 1/H NMR spectroscopy was performed with the 5 mm probe of a Varian XL300 instrument. Creatine, lactate, carnosine, and choline were the major resonances in the one-dimensional spectra of both extracts. With creatine as reference, 2.5-fold more lactate was found in SCOL than in CP, and a much smaller difference was also found in their carnosine content. Two-dimensional COSY comparison revealed several differences between the two extracts. Taurine, N-acetyl glutamate, glycerophosphoryl choline (or phosphoryl choline) and an unidentified spot were present only in the extract from SCOL but not in that from CP. On the other hand, aspartate, hydroxy-proline, carnitine and glycerophosphoryl ethanolamine were only present in CP but absent in SCOL. Alanine, cysteine, lysine and arginine appeared in both extracts without an apparent intensity difference.},
doi = {},
journal = {Fed. Proc., Fed. Am. Soc. Exp. Biol.; (United States)},
number = ,
volume = 45:3,
place = {United States},
year = 1986,
month = 3
}

Conference:
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