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Title: Blood lead levels and chronic blood loss

Abstract

Over 90% of lead in blood is bound to the erythrocytes. This high affinity of lead for red cells may mean that chronic blood loss is a significant means for excretion of lead. This study sought correlations between blood lead levels and clinical conditions involving chronic blood loss. During May, June and July, 146 patients with normal hematocrits and red cell indices were identified from the hospital and clinic populations. For each patient, age, race, sex and medical history were noted, and a whole blood sample was analyzed by flameless atomic absorption spectrophotometry. Age-and race-matched pairs showed a significant correlation of chronic blood loss with lead levels. Patients with the longest history of blood loss (menstruating women) had the lowest level (mean 6.13 ..mu..g/dl, range 3.6-10.3 ..mu..g/dl). Post-menopausal women had levels (7.29 ..mu..g/dl, 1.2-14 ..mu..g/dl) comparable to men with peptic ulcer disease, or colon carcinoma (7.31 ..mu..g/dl, 5.3-8.6 ..mu..g/dl). The highest levels were among men who had no history of bleeding problems (12.39 ..mu..g/dl, 2.08-39.35 ..mu..g/dl). Chronic blood loss may be a major factor responsible for sexual differences in blood lead levels. Since tissue deposition of environmental pollutants is implicated in diseases, menstruation may represent a survival advantage for women.

Authors:
; ; ;
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Univ. of Southern Alabama, Mobile
OSTI Identifier:
5384382
Alternate Identifier(s):
OSTI ID: 5384382
Report Number(s):
CONF-8604222-
Journal ID: CODEN: FEPRA
Resource Type:
Conference
Resource Relation:
Journal Name: Fed. Proc., Fed. Am. Soc. Exp. Biol.; (United States); Journal Volume: 45:3; Conference: 70. annual meeting of the Federation of American Society for Experimental Biology, St. Louis, MO, USA, 13 Apr 1986
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
63 RADIATION, THERMAL, AND OTHER ENVIRON. POLLUTANT EFFECTS ON LIVING ORGS. AND BIOL. MAT.; 59 BASIC BIOLOGICAL SCIENCES; BLOOD; LOSSES; LEAD; EXCRETION; TISSUE DISTRIBUTION; ABSORPTION SPECTROSCOPY; AFFINITY; AGE DEPENDENCE; BLOOD COUNT; ERYTHROCYTES; MENSTRUAL CYCLE; PATIENTS; SEX DEPENDENCE; TOXICITY; BIOLOGICAL MATERIALS; BLOOD CELLS; BODY FLUIDS; CLEARANCE; DISTRIBUTION; ELEMENTS; MATERIALS; METALS; SPECTROSCOPY 560306* -- Chemicals Metabolism & Toxicology-- Man-- (-1987); 550900 -- Pathology

Citation Formats

Manci, E.A., Cabaniss, M.L., Boerth, R.C., and Blackburn, W.R.. Blood lead levels and chronic blood loss. United States: N. p., 1986. Web.
Manci, E.A., Cabaniss, M.L., Boerth, R.C., & Blackburn, W.R.. Blood lead levels and chronic blood loss. United States.
Manci, E.A., Cabaniss, M.L., Boerth, R.C., and Blackburn, W.R.. Sat . "Blood lead levels and chronic blood loss". United States. doi:.
@article{osti_5384382,
title = {Blood lead levels and chronic blood loss},
author = {Manci, E.A. and Cabaniss, M.L. and Boerth, R.C. and Blackburn, W.R.},
abstractNote = {Over 90% of lead in blood is bound to the erythrocytes. This high affinity of lead for red cells may mean that chronic blood loss is a significant means for excretion of lead. This study sought correlations between blood lead levels and clinical conditions involving chronic blood loss. During May, June and July, 146 patients with normal hematocrits and red cell indices were identified from the hospital and clinic populations. For each patient, age, race, sex and medical history were noted, and a whole blood sample was analyzed by flameless atomic absorption spectrophotometry. Age-and race-matched pairs showed a significant correlation of chronic blood loss with lead levels. Patients with the longest history of blood loss (menstruating women) had the lowest level (mean 6.13 ..mu..g/dl, range 3.6-10.3 ..mu..g/dl). Post-menopausal women had levels (7.29 ..mu..g/dl, 1.2-14 ..mu..g/dl) comparable to men with peptic ulcer disease, or colon carcinoma (7.31 ..mu..g/dl, 5.3-8.6 ..mu..g/dl). The highest levels were among men who had no history of bleeding problems (12.39 ..mu..g/dl, 2.08-39.35 ..mu..g/dl). Chronic blood loss may be a major factor responsible for sexual differences in blood lead levels. Since tissue deposition of environmental pollutants is implicated in diseases, menstruation may represent a survival advantage for women.},
doi = {},
journal = {Fed. Proc., Fed. Am. Soc. Exp. Biol.; (United States)},
number = ,
volume = 45:3,
place = {United States},
year = {Sat Mar 01 00:00:00 EST 1986},
month = {Sat Mar 01 00:00:00 EST 1986}
}

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  • Female mice were fed diets containing either 0 or 20 g/kg calcium phytate with 0, 2, 10 or 50 mg/kg lead acetate. Animals were sacrificed at 3 or 6 months and blood samples were measured for lead by flameless atomic absorption spectrophotometry. There were no significant effects of either calcium phytate or lead acetate on body weight during the study. After 3 months feeding, the average weight was 35 g, and this increased slightly to 37 g after a further 3 months. After both 3 and 6 months feeding, there was no greater blood lead concentration in the 2 mg/kgmore » group than in those given no lead acetate, although over the last 3 months both blood lead concentrations tripled. After feeding 10 mg/kg, a significant difference due to phytate appeared only in the 6 month group, however, at 50 mg/kg, there were significant effects of phytate after both 3 and 6 months feeding. (JMT)« less
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