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Title: Global perspective on energy. [Projecting into 21st century]

Abstract

The technological world of today finds us with a population of over 4 billion with a doubling time of 30 to 40 years. Even with the rapid introduction of effective fertility control, the momentum of population - a phenomenon caused by a population age structure biased toward the young - will carry us to a population of 12 to 16 billion in the 21st century. With fixed land resources, the energy inputs to support the increased population will be several tims the present world energy consumption. How does this conclusion square with the notion that we are running out of energy. Are the billions of new people doomed to malnutrition and disease because we cannot provide the energy needed to support them. Answering in the negative, the author says: (1) proved reserves of conventional energy resources are substantial and the prospects of adding to these reserves are good; (2) unconventional resources of oil, gas, and uranium are many times larger than our present conventional reserves; and (3) nuclear fisson energy alone could support the world for several centuries. Even though the general energy picture is bright, the outlook for the less developed countries is not, he feels. To exploit themore » energy sources of the future requires large capital investments - something that only the developed countries can manage. One of the major contributions the developed countries can make to those that are less fortunate is to take the pressure off oil so as to stabilize the price and supply situation. In this regard, the US is in an excellent position to take the lead.« less

Authors:
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (USA)
OSTI Identifier:
5377428
Report Number(s):
CONF-800403-43
DOE Contract Number:
W-7405-ENG-26
Resource Type:
Conference
Resource Relation:
Conference: ANS thermal reactor safety meeting, Knoxville, TN, USA, 8 Apr 1980
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
29 ENERGY PLANNING, POLICY AND ECONOMY; DEVELOPING COUNTRIES; ENERGY SUPPLIES; ENERGY SOURCES; GLOBAL ASPECTS; POPULATION DYNAMICS; USA; NORTH AMERICA; 292000* - Energy Planning & Policy- Supply, Demand & Forecasting

Citation Formats

Anderson, T.D.. Global perspective on energy. [Projecting into 21st century]. United States: N. p., 1980. Web.
Anderson, T.D.. Global perspective on energy. [Projecting into 21st century]. United States.
Anderson, T.D.. 1980. "Global perspective on energy. [Projecting into 21st century]". United States. doi:.
@article{osti_5377428,
title = {Global perspective on energy. [Projecting into 21st century]},
author = {Anderson, T.D.},
abstractNote = {The technological world of today finds us with a population of over 4 billion with a doubling time of 30 to 40 years. Even with the rapid introduction of effective fertility control, the momentum of population - a phenomenon caused by a population age structure biased toward the young - will carry us to a population of 12 to 16 billion in the 21st century. With fixed land resources, the energy inputs to support the increased population will be several tims the present world energy consumption. How does this conclusion square with the notion that we are running out of energy. Are the billions of new people doomed to malnutrition and disease because we cannot provide the energy needed to support them. Answering in the negative, the author says: (1) proved reserves of conventional energy resources are substantial and the prospects of adding to these reserves are good; (2) unconventional resources of oil, gas, and uranium are many times larger than our present conventional reserves; and (3) nuclear fisson energy alone could support the world for several centuries. Even though the general energy picture is bright, the outlook for the less developed countries is not, he feels. To exploit the energy sources of the future requires large capital investments - something that only the developed countries can manage. One of the major contributions the developed countries can make to those that are less fortunate is to take the pressure off oil so as to stabilize the price and supply situation. In this regard, the US is in an excellent position to take the lead.},
doi = {},
journal = {},
number = ,
volume = ,
place = {United States},
year = 1980,
month = 4
}

Conference:
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