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Title: Waste/Rock Interactions Technology Program: the status of radionuclide sorption-desorption studies performed by the WRIT program

Abstract

The most credible means for radionuclides disposed as solid wastes in deep-geologic repositories to reach the biosphere is through dissolution of the solid waste and subsequent radionuclide transport by circulating ground water. Thus safety assessment activities must consider the physicochemical interactions between radionculides present in ground water with package components, rocks and sediments since these processes can significantly delay or constrain the mass transport of radionuclides in comparison to ground-water movement. This paper focuses on interactions between dissolved radiouclides in ground water and rocks and sediments away from the near-field repository. The primary mechanism discussed is adsorption-desorption, which has been studied using two approaches. Empirical studies of adsorption-desorption rely on distribution coefficient measurements while mechanism studies strive to identify, differentiate and quantify the processes that control nuclide retardation.

Authors:
;
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Pacific Northwest Lab., Richland, WA (USA)
OSTI Identifier:
5361396
Report Number(s):
PNL-3997
ON: DE82013874; TRN: 82-012998
DOE Contract Number:
AC06-76RL01830
Resource Type:
Technical Report
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
12 MANAGEMENT OF RADIOACTIVE AND NON-RADIOACTIVE WASTES FROM NUCLEAR FACILITIES; 58 GEOSCIENCES; BASALT; SORPTIVE PROPERTIES; CESIUM; SORPTION; CLAYS; GROUND WATER; RADIONUCLIDE MIGRATION; NEPTUNIUM; PLUTONIUM 239; RADIOACTIVE WASTE DISPOSAL; WASTE-ROCK INTERACTIONS; STRONTIUM; TECHNETIUM; URANIUM; ZEOLITES; AUTORADIOGRAPHY; COMPUTER CALCULATIONS; DESORPTION; IRON COMPOUNDS; LIMESTONE; MICROSCOPY; REDOX REACTIONS; UNDERGROUND DISPOSAL; W CODES; ACTINIDE ISOTOPES; ACTINIDE NUCLEI; ACTINIDES; ALKALI METALS; ALKALINE EARTH METALS; ALPHA DECAY RADIOISOTOPES; CARBONATE ROCKS; CHEMICAL REACTIONS; COMPUTER CODES; ELEMENTS; ENVIRONMENTAL TRANSPORT; EVEN-ODD NUCLEI; HEAVY NUCLEI; HYDROGEN COMPOUNDS; IGNEOUS ROCKS; INORGANIC ION EXCHANGERS; ION EXCHANGE MATERIALS; ISOTOPES; MANAGEMENT; MASS TRANSFER; MATERIALS; METALS; MINERALS; NUCLEI; OXYGEN COMPOUNDS; PLUTONIUM ISOTOPES; RADIOISOTOPES; ROCKS; SEDIMENTARY ROCKS; SURFACE PROPERTIES; TRANSITION ELEMENT COMPOUNDS; TRANSITION ELEMENTS; TRANSURANIUM ELEMENTS; VOLCANIC ROCKS; WASTE DISPOSAL; WASTE MANAGEMENT; WATER; YEARS LIVING RADIOISOTOPES; 052002* - Nuclear Fuels- Waste Disposal & Storage; 580300 - Mineralogy, Petrology, & Rock Mechanics- (-1989)

Citation Formats

Serne, R.J., and Relyea, J.F. Waste/Rock Interactions Technology Program: the status of radionuclide sorption-desorption studies performed by the WRIT program. United States: N. p., 1982. Web. doi:10.2172/5361396.
Serne, R.J., & Relyea, J.F. Waste/Rock Interactions Technology Program: the status of radionuclide sorption-desorption studies performed by the WRIT program. United States. doi:10.2172/5361396.
Serne, R.J., and Relyea, J.F. Thu . "Waste/Rock Interactions Technology Program: the status of radionuclide sorption-desorption studies performed by the WRIT program". United States. doi:10.2172/5361396. https://www.osti.gov/servlets/purl/5361396.
@article{osti_5361396,
title = {Waste/Rock Interactions Technology Program: the status of radionuclide sorption-desorption studies performed by the WRIT program},
author = {Serne, R.J. and Relyea, J.F.},
abstractNote = {The most credible means for radionuclides disposed as solid wastes in deep-geologic repositories to reach the biosphere is through dissolution of the solid waste and subsequent radionuclide transport by circulating ground water. Thus safety assessment activities must consider the physicochemical interactions between radionculides present in ground water with package components, rocks and sediments since these processes can significantly delay or constrain the mass transport of radionuclides in comparison to ground-water movement. This paper focuses on interactions between dissolved radiouclides in ground water and rocks and sediments away from the near-field repository. The primary mechanism discussed is adsorption-desorption, which has been studied using two approaches. Empirical studies of adsorption-desorption rely on distribution coefficient measurements while mechanism studies strive to identify, differentiate and quantify the processes that control nuclide retardation.},
doi = {10.2172/5361396},
journal = {},
number = ,
volume = ,
place = {United States},
year = {Thu Apr 01 00:00:00 EST 1982},
month = {Thu Apr 01 00:00:00 EST 1982}
}

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