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Title: Automated biometric access control system for two-man-rule enforcement

Abstract

This paper describes a limited access control system for nuclear facilities which makes use of the eye retinal identity verifier to control the passage of personnel into and out of one or a group of security controlled working areas. This access control system requires no keys, cards or credentials. The user simply enters his Personal Identification Number (PIN) and takes an eye reading to request passage. The PIN does not have to be kept secret. The system then relies on biometric identity verification of the user, along with other system information, to make the decision of whether or not to unlock the door. It also enforces multiple zones control with personnel tracking and the two-man-rule.

Authors:
;  [1];  [2]
  1. (Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States))
  2. (EG and G, Mound Applied Technologies, Inc., Miamisburg, OH (US))
Publication Date:
OSTI Identifier:
5353313
Report Number(s):
CONF-910774-
Journal ID: ISSN 0362-0034; CODEN: NUMMB
DOE Contract Number:
AC04-76DP00789
Resource Type:
Conference
Resource Relation:
Journal Name: Nuclear Materials Management. Annual Meeting Proceedings; (United States); Journal Volume: 20; Conference: 32. Institute of Nuclear Materials Management (INMM) annual meeting, New Orleans, LA (United States), 28-31 Jul 1991
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
98 NUCLEAR DISARMAMENT, SAFEGUARDS, AND PHYSICAL PROTECTION; NUCLEAR FACILITIES; PERSONNEL; IDENTIFICATION SYSTEMS; AUTOMATION; EYES; RETINA; VERIFICATION; BODY; BODY AREAS; FACE; HEAD; ORGANS; SENSE ORGANS; 055000* - Nuclear Fuels- Safeguards, Inspection, & Accountability

Citation Formats

Holmes, J.P., Maxwell, R.L., and Henderson, R.W. Automated biometric access control system for two-man-rule enforcement. United States: N. p., 1991. Web.
Holmes, J.P., Maxwell, R.L., & Henderson, R.W. Automated biometric access control system for two-man-rule enforcement. United States.
Holmes, J.P., Maxwell, R.L., and Henderson, R.W. 1991. "Automated biometric access control system for two-man-rule enforcement". United States. doi:.
@article{osti_5353313,
title = {Automated biometric access control system for two-man-rule enforcement},
author = {Holmes, J.P. and Maxwell, R.L. and Henderson, R.W.},
abstractNote = {This paper describes a limited access control system for nuclear facilities which makes use of the eye retinal identity verifier to control the passage of personnel into and out of one or a group of security controlled working areas. This access control system requires no keys, cards or credentials. The user simply enters his Personal Identification Number (PIN) and takes an eye reading to request passage. The PIN does not have to be kept secret. The system then relies on biometric identity verification of the user, along with other system information, to make the decision of whether or not to unlock the door. It also enforces multiple zones control with personnel tracking and the two-man-rule.},
doi = {},
journal = {Nuclear Materials Management. Annual Meeting Proceedings; (United States)},
number = ,
volume = 20,
place = {United States},
year = 1991,
month = 1
}

Conference:
Other availability
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