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Title: Cumberlandian Mollusk Conservation Program. Activity 3: identification of fish hosts. [Conradilla caelata; Quadrula intermedia; Epioblasma brevidens; Epioblasma capsaeformis; Epioblasma triquetra; Quadrula cylindrica; Carunculina moesta]

Abstract

A key element of the Cumberlandian Mollusk Conservation Program undertaken by TVA in 1979 was the determination of fish hosts of Cumberlandian mussel species unique to the Tennessee River drainage and especially the species whose habitat would be inundated by completion of Columbia Dam on the Duck River, Tennessee. Principal emphasis was placed on the birdwing pearly mussel, Conradilla caelata and the Cumberland monkeyface, Quadrula intermedia - two federally listed endangered species with limited distributions outside the proposed inundation zone of the Duck River. Additional species studied included three species of the genus Epioblasma (E. brevidens, E. capsaeformis, and E. triquetra), Quadrula cylindrica, Villosa iris, and Carunculina moesta. Experimental glochidial infection of 55 fish species resulted in the establishment of the following mussel-fish host relationships: Conradilla caelata - Etheostoma zonale; Quadrule intermedia - Hybopsis dissimilis, Hybopsis insignis; Epioblasma brevidens - Etheostoma blennioides, Etheostoma maculatum, Etheostoma rufilineatum, Etheostoma simoterum, Percina caprodes, Cottus carolinae; Epioblasma capsaeformis - Etheostoma maculatum, Etheostoma rufilineatum, Percina sciera, Cottus carolinae; Epioblasma triquetra - Percina caprodes, Cottus carolinae; Quadrula cylindrica - Notropis galacturus, Notropis spilopterus, Hybopsis amblops; and Carunculina moesta - Lepomis cyanellus, Lepomis megalotis.

Authors:
 [1]
  1. (ed.)
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Tennessee Valley Authority, Norris (USA). Div. of Services and Field Operations
OSTI Identifier:
5328145
Alternate Identifier(s):
OSTI ID: 5328145; Legacy ID: DE86901705
Report Number(s):
TVA/ONRED/AWR-86/17
ON: DE86901705
Resource Type:
Technical Report
Resource Relation:
Other Information: Portions of this document are illegible in microfiche products
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
54 ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCES; 13 HYDRO ENERGY; MUSSELS; ECOLOGY; RIVERS; TENNESSEE VALLEY REGION; ENDANGERED SPECIES; FISHES; HABITAT; PARASITES; TENNESSEE; ANIMALS; AQUATIC ORGANISMS; FEDERAL REGION IV; INVERTEBRATES; MOLLUSCS; NORTH AMERICA; STREAMS; SURFACE WATERS; USA; VERTEBRATES 520500* -- Environment, Aquatic-- Site Resource & Use Studies-- (-1989); 130600 -- Hydro Energy-- Environmental Aspects

Citation Formats

Hill, D.M.. Cumberlandian Mollusk Conservation Program. Activity 3: identification of fish hosts. [Conradilla caelata; Quadrula intermedia; Epioblasma brevidens; Epioblasma capsaeformis; Epioblasma triquetra; Quadrula cylindrica; Carunculina moesta]. United States: N. p., 1986. Web.
Hill, D.M.. Cumberlandian Mollusk Conservation Program. Activity 3: identification of fish hosts. [Conradilla caelata; Quadrula intermedia; Epioblasma brevidens; Epioblasma capsaeformis; Epioblasma triquetra; Quadrula cylindrica; Carunculina moesta]. United States.
Hill, D.M.. Sat . "Cumberlandian Mollusk Conservation Program. Activity 3: identification of fish hosts. [Conradilla caelata; Quadrula intermedia; Epioblasma brevidens; Epioblasma capsaeformis; Epioblasma triquetra; Quadrula cylindrica; Carunculina moesta]". United States. doi:.
@article{osti_5328145,
title = {Cumberlandian Mollusk Conservation Program. Activity 3: identification of fish hosts. [Conradilla caelata; Quadrula intermedia; Epioblasma brevidens; Epioblasma capsaeformis; Epioblasma triquetra; Quadrula cylindrica; Carunculina moesta]},
author = {Hill, D.M.},
abstractNote = {A key element of the Cumberlandian Mollusk Conservation Program undertaken by TVA in 1979 was the determination of fish hosts of Cumberlandian mussel species unique to the Tennessee River drainage and especially the species whose habitat would be inundated by completion of Columbia Dam on the Duck River, Tennessee. Principal emphasis was placed on the birdwing pearly mussel, Conradilla caelata and the Cumberland monkeyface, Quadrula intermedia - two federally listed endangered species with limited distributions outside the proposed inundation zone of the Duck River. Additional species studied included three species of the genus Epioblasma (E. brevidens, E. capsaeformis, and E. triquetra), Quadrula cylindrica, Villosa iris, and Carunculina moesta. Experimental glochidial infection of 55 fish species resulted in the establishment of the following mussel-fish host relationships: Conradilla caelata - Etheostoma zonale; Quadrule intermedia - Hybopsis dissimilis, Hybopsis insignis; Epioblasma brevidens - Etheostoma blennioides, Etheostoma maculatum, Etheostoma rufilineatum, Etheostoma simoterum, Percina caprodes, Cottus carolinae; Epioblasma capsaeformis - Etheostoma maculatum, Etheostoma rufilineatum, Percina sciera, Cottus carolinae; Epioblasma triquetra - Percina caprodes, Cottus carolinae; Quadrula cylindrica - Notropis galacturus, Notropis spilopterus, Hybopsis amblops; and Carunculina moesta - Lepomis cyanellus, Lepomis megalotis.},
doi = {},
journal = {},
number = ,
volume = ,
place = {United States},
year = {Sat Feb 01 00:00:00 EST 1986},
month = {Sat Feb 01 00:00:00 EST 1986}
}

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  • Fish species from sand/gravel substrates and from rubble substrates which are the most likely hosts for Cumberlandian mussel fauna, C. caelata and Q. intermedia, from the Clinch, Duck, Elk, and Powell Rivers are reported. Infection with mollusk glochidia was used with overlap and occurrences to develop a ranking of each species potential as a suitable host for Cumberlandian mollusks. 12 ref., 4 figs., 9 tabs.
  • This study provides information that may be critical to the continued survival of the mussels Conradilla caelata and Qadrula intermedia in several rivers throughout the region. The biotic components of several river reaches that have populations of these endangered species were examined to determine what biotic attributes were different from those study reaches that did not have these mussels. In all cases the quantity and quality of the benthos would be considered adequate to sustain those consumers, in this case fish, that are necessary to assure continuation of the mussel community. If fish other than Etheostoma zonale (banded darter) aremore » determined to be acceptable hosts for either Conradilla caelata or Qadrula intermedia then there will probably be adequate numbers at each potential transplant site to accomplish reproduction. During this study we have determined that the benthic macrofauna at all sites is adequate, and supports a fish assemblage of considerable diversity and abundance, hence it is probable that adequate fish hosts are available to accommodate a complex mussel fauna.« less
  • This report describes the selection process and the composite analysis of 15 short reaches of free flowing streams in which the physical, limnological, botanical, and zoological components were examined. The purpose was to identify combinations of environmental conditions which occur in the study areas that support populations of Cumberlandian freshwater mussels and to select transplant sites which could support populations of selected Cumberlandian mussel species, especially Conradilla caelata, once they were (re)introduced. This report is divided into three major sections (selection of study reaches, selection of transplant sites, and habitat characterization) two of which appear to fall in reverse order.more » Chronologically, transplant sites for the birdwing pearly mussel, Conradilla caelata, were selected before the characterization of mussel habitat could be completed. Since the transplants were made based upon the comparison of sites presented in that analysis, the site selection description was retained in an unmodified state.« less
  • While exact requirements for successful mussel reproduction and survival vary for individual species and are not completely understood, general considerations for establishing a successful transplant should include: (1) substrate composition, stability, and availability; (2) stream hydrology and topography; (3) water quality; (4) presence of host fish and associated ecological requirements; and (5) stream nutrition or trophic status. The purpose of this report is to provide insight to importance of (1) emergent and submersed aquatic macrophytes relative to substrate stability and host fish ecology, (2) phytoplankton, zooplankton, and periphyton abundance relative to mussel nutritional requirements, and (3) aquatic macrophyte, plankton, andmore » periphyton community structures relative to comparing ecological similarities among designated study areas. Study areas are also contrasted based on suspended organic solids information.« less
  • Activity 5 of the Cumberlandian Mollusk Conservation Program (CMCP) evaluated physical conditions at 15 study reaches in the Tennessee River Valley. This was part of a multiphase project to study several environmental factors as they relate to freshwater mussels. Areas of the Buffalo and Clinch Rivers, Copper Creek, and the Duck, Elk, Nolichucky, North Fork Holston, Paint Rock, and Powell Rivers were surveyed and measured to determine physical, hydrologic, hydraulic, substrate, and suspended sediment conditions. Data collected over a two-year period are summarized and presented in graphic and tabular form to facilitate the classification of river reaches according to habitatmore » suitability for the endangered mussels. The effect of instream structures (low-head dams) on the nature and stability of the downstream substrates was studied. This task was conducted to determine if these dams alter the downstream physical environment to provide favorable conditions for mussel survival.« less