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Title: Phytoremediation of a radiocesium-contaminated soil: Field evaluation of {sup 137}Cs bioaccumulation in the shoots of three plant species. Quarterly technical progress report, October 1, 1996--December 31, 1996

Abstract

A field study was conducted to investigate the potential of three plant species for phytoremediation of a {sup 137}Cs-contaminated site. From the contaminated soil, approximately 40-fold more radiocesium was removed in shoots of red root pigweed (Amaranthus retroflexus L.) compared with those of Indian mustard (Brassica juncea (L.) Czern) and tepary bean (Phaseolus acutifolius A. Gray). The greater potential for {sup 137}Cs removal from the soil by Amaranthus was associated with both high concentration of radiocesium in shoots and high shoot biomass production. Approximately 3% of the total {sup 137}Cs was removed from the top 15 cm of the soil in shoots of three-month-old Amaranthus plants. Soil leaching tests conducted with 0.1 and 0.5 M NH{sub 4}NO{sub 3} solutions eluted as much as 15 and 19%, respectively, of the soil {sup 137}Cs. Addition of NH{sub 4}NO{sub 3} to the soil, however, had no positive effect on {sup 137}Cs accumulation in shoots in any of the species investigated. It is proposed that either NH{sub 4}NO{sub 3} solution quickly percolated through the soil before interacting at specific {sup 137}Cs binding sites or radiocesium mobilized by NH{sub 4}NO{sub 3} application moved below the rhizosphere becoming unavailable for root uptake. Further research is requiredmore » to enhance the phytotransfer of the NH{sub 4}NO{sub 3}-mobilized {sup 137}Cs. With two croppings of Amaranthus per year and a sustained rate of extraction, phytoremediation of this {sup 137}Cs-contaminated soil appears feasible in less than 15 years.« less

Authors:
; ;  [1];  [2];  [3]
  1. Cornell Univ., Ithaca, NY (United States). US Plant, Soil and Nutrition Lab.
  2. Brookhaven National Lab., Upton, NY (United States). Environmental and Waste Technology Center
  3. MSE Technology Applications, Inc., Butte, MT (United States)
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Agricultural Research Service, Ithaca, NY (United States). U.S. Plant, Soil and Nutrition Lab.
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE Assistant Secretary for Fossil Energy, Washington, DC (United States)
OSTI Identifier:
527484
Report Number(s):
DOE/PC/95701-T8
ON: DE97053484; TRN: AHC29720%%76
DOE Contract Number:  
AI22-95PC95701
Resource Type:
Technical Report
Resource Relation:
Other Information: PBD: [1997]
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
54 ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCES; 56 BIOLOGY AND MEDICINE, APPLIED STUDIES; CESIUM 137; BIODEGRADATION; REMEDIAL ACTION; PROGRESS REPORT; RADIOACTIVE WASTE MANAGEMENT; SOILS; PLANTS; BIOLOGICAL ACCUMULATION; ROOT ABSORPTION; EXPERIMENTAL DATA; FIELD TESTS

Citation Formats

Lasat, M M, Ebbs, S D, Kochian, L V, Fuhrman, M, and Cornish, J. Phytoremediation of a radiocesium-contaminated soil: Field evaluation of {sup 137}Cs bioaccumulation in the shoots of three plant species. Quarterly technical progress report, October 1, 1996--December 31, 1996. United States: N. p., 1997. Web. doi:10.2172/527484.
Lasat, M M, Ebbs, S D, Kochian, L V, Fuhrman, M, & Cornish, J. Phytoremediation of a radiocesium-contaminated soil: Field evaluation of {sup 137}Cs bioaccumulation in the shoots of three plant species. Quarterly technical progress report, October 1, 1996--December 31, 1996. United States. https://doi.org/10.2172/527484
Lasat, M M, Ebbs, S D, Kochian, L V, Fuhrman, M, and Cornish, J. Fri . "Phytoremediation of a radiocesium-contaminated soil: Field evaluation of {sup 137}Cs bioaccumulation in the shoots of three plant species. Quarterly technical progress report, October 1, 1996--December 31, 1996". United States. https://doi.org/10.2172/527484. https://www.osti.gov/servlets/purl/527484.
@article{osti_527484,
title = {Phytoremediation of a radiocesium-contaminated soil: Field evaluation of {sup 137}Cs bioaccumulation in the shoots of three plant species. Quarterly technical progress report, October 1, 1996--December 31, 1996},
author = {Lasat, M M and Ebbs, S D and Kochian, L V and Fuhrman, M and Cornish, J},
abstractNote = {A field study was conducted to investigate the potential of three plant species for phytoremediation of a {sup 137}Cs-contaminated site. From the contaminated soil, approximately 40-fold more radiocesium was removed in shoots of red root pigweed (Amaranthus retroflexus L.) compared with those of Indian mustard (Brassica juncea (L.) Czern) and tepary bean (Phaseolus acutifolius A. Gray). The greater potential for {sup 137}Cs removal from the soil by Amaranthus was associated with both high concentration of radiocesium in shoots and high shoot biomass production. Approximately 3% of the total {sup 137}Cs was removed from the top 15 cm of the soil in shoots of three-month-old Amaranthus plants. Soil leaching tests conducted with 0.1 and 0.5 M NH{sub 4}NO{sub 3} solutions eluted as much as 15 and 19%, respectively, of the soil {sup 137}Cs. Addition of NH{sub 4}NO{sub 3} to the soil, however, had no positive effect on {sup 137}Cs accumulation in shoots in any of the species investigated. It is proposed that either NH{sub 4}NO{sub 3} solution quickly percolated through the soil before interacting at specific {sup 137}Cs binding sites or radiocesium mobilized by NH{sub 4}NO{sub 3} application moved below the rhizosphere becoming unavailable for root uptake. Further research is required to enhance the phytotransfer of the NH{sub 4}NO{sub 3}-mobilized {sup 137}Cs. With two croppings of Amaranthus per year and a sustained rate of extraction, phytoremediation of this {sup 137}Cs-contaminated soil appears feasible in less than 15 years.},
doi = {10.2172/527484},
url = {https://www.osti.gov/biblio/527484}, journal = {},
number = ,
volume = ,
place = {United States},
year = {1997},
month = {8}
}