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Title: Personnel protection through reconnaissance robotics at Superfund remedial sites

Abstract

Investigation, mitigation, and clean-up of hazardous materials at Superfund sites normally require on-site workers to perform hazardous and sometimes potentially dangerous functions. Such functions include site surveys and the reconnaissance for airborne and buried toxic environmental contaminants. Workers conducting on-site air monitoring risk dermal, ocular and inhalation exposure to hazardous chemicals, while those performing excavations also risk in addition the potential exposure to fire, explosion, and other physical injury. EPA's current efforts to protect its workers and mitigate these risks include the use of robotic devices. Using robots offers the ultimate in personnel protection by removing the worker from the site of potential exposure. The paper describes the demonstration of a commercially-available robotic platform modified and equipped for air monitoring and the ongoing research for the development of a ground penetrating radar (GPR) system to detect buried chemical waste drums. These robotic devices can be ultimately routinely deployed in the field for the purpose of conducting inherently safe reconnaissance activities during Superfund/SARA remedial operations.

Authors:
; ;
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Environmental Protection Agency, Cincinnati, OH (United States). Risk Reduction Engineering Lab.
OSTI Identifier:
5268341
Report Number(s):
PB-92-166743/XAB; EPA--600/J-92/140
Resource Type:
Technical Report
Resource Relation:
Other Information: Pub. in Jnl. of Air and Waste Management Association, v42 n3 p341-345 Mar 92. See also PB90-134164
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
54 ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCES; 63 RADIATION, THERMAL, AND OTHER ENVIRON. POLLUTANT EFFECTS ON LIVING ORGS. AND BIOL. MAT.; HAZARDOUS MATERIALS; AIR POLLUTION MONITORING; ROBOTS; DEMONSTRATION PROGRAMS; CHEMICAL WASTES; COMPUTERIZED CONTROL SYSTEMS; ENVIRONMENTAL TRANSPORT; INHALATION; MITIGATION; OCCUPATIONAL EXPOSURE; PERSONNEL; REMEDIAL ACTION; SITE SURVEYS; US SUPERFUND; WASTE MANAGEMENT; CONTROL SYSTEMS; INTAKE; LAWS; MANAGEMENT; MASS TRANSFER; MATERIALS; MONITORING; NONRADIOACTIVE WASTES; ON-LINE CONTROL SYSTEMS; ON-LINE SYSTEMS; POLLUTION LAWS; WASTES 540120* -- Environment, Atmospheric-- Chemicals Monitoring & Transport-- (1990-); 560300 -- Chemicals Metabolism & Toxicology

Citation Formats

Frank, U., Esposito, C., and Sullivan, D. Personnel protection through reconnaissance robotics at Superfund remedial sites. United States: N. p., 1992. Web.
Frank, U., Esposito, C., & Sullivan, D. Personnel protection through reconnaissance robotics at Superfund remedial sites. United States.
Frank, U., Esposito, C., and Sullivan, D. 1992. "Personnel protection through reconnaissance robotics at Superfund remedial sites". United States. doi:.
@article{osti_5268341,
title = {Personnel protection through reconnaissance robotics at Superfund remedial sites},
author = {Frank, U. and Esposito, C. and Sullivan, D.},
abstractNote = {Investigation, mitigation, and clean-up of hazardous materials at Superfund sites normally require on-site workers to perform hazardous and sometimes potentially dangerous functions. Such functions include site surveys and the reconnaissance for airborne and buried toxic environmental contaminants. Workers conducting on-site air monitoring risk dermal, ocular and inhalation exposure to hazardous chemicals, while those performing excavations also risk in addition the potential exposure to fire, explosion, and other physical injury. EPA's current efforts to protect its workers and mitigate these risks include the use of robotic devices. Using robots offers the ultimate in personnel protection by removing the worker from the site of potential exposure. The paper describes the demonstration of a commercially-available robotic platform modified and equipped for air monitoring and the ongoing research for the development of a ground penetrating radar (GPR) system to detect buried chemical waste drums. These robotic devices can be ultimately routinely deployed in the field for the purpose of conducting inherently safe reconnaissance activities during Superfund/SARA remedial operations.},
doi = {},
journal = {},
number = ,
volume = ,
place = {United States},
year = 1992,
month = 1
}

Technical Report:
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