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Title: Systems approach to nuclear waste glass development

Abstract

Development of a host solid for the immobilization of nuclear waste has focused on various vitreous wasteforms. The systems approach requires that parameters affecting product performance and processing be considered simultaneously. Application of the systems approach indicates that borosilicate glasses are, overall, the most suitable glasses for the immobilization of nuclear waste. Phosphate glasses are highly durable; but the glass melts are highly corrosive and the glasses have poor thermal stability and low solubility for many waste components. High-silica glasses have good chemical durability, thermal stability, and mechanical stability, but the associated high melting temperatures increase volatilization of hazardous species in the waste. Borosilicate glasses are chemically durable and are stable both thermally and mechanically. The borosilicate melts are generally less corrosive than commercial glasses, and the melt temperature miimizes excessive volatility of hazardous species. Optimization of borosilicate waste glass formulations has led to their acceptance as the reference nuclear wasteform in the United States, United Kingdom, Belgium, Germany, France, Sweden, Switzerland, and Japan.

Authors:
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Savannah River Lab., Aiken, SC (USA)
OSTI Identifier:
5262794
Report Number(s):
DP-MS-85-72; CONF-860769-1
ON: DE86015690
DOE Contract Number:
AC09-76SR00001
Resource Type:
Conference
Resource Relation:
Conference: Conference on physics and chemistry of glass and glassmaking, Alfred, NY, USA, 30 Jul 1986
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
12 MANAGEMENT OF RADIOACTIVE AND NON-RADIOACTIVE WASTES FROM NUCLEAR FACILITIES; HIGH-LEVEL RADIOACTIVE WASTES; WASTE FORMS; BOROSILICATE GLASS; CERAMICS; CHEMICAL COMPOSITION; PHASE DIAGRAMS; PHOSPHATE GLASS; DIAGRAMS; GLASS; MATERIALS; RADIOACTIVE MATERIALS; RADIOACTIVE WASTES; WASTES; 052001* - Nuclear Fuels- Waste Processing

Citation Formats

Jantzen, C M. Systems approach to nuclear waste glass development. United States: N. p., 1986. Web.
Jantzen, C M. Systems approach to nuclear waste glass development. United States.
Jantzen, C M. Wed . "Systems approach to nuclear waste glass development". United States. doi:. https://www.osti.gov/servlets/purl/5262794.
@article{osti_5262794,
title = {Systems approach to nuclear waste glass development},
author = {Jantzen, C M},
abstractNote = {Development of a host solid for the immobilization of nuclear waste has focused on various vitreous wasteforms. The systems approach requires that parameters affecting product performance and processing be considered simultaneously. Application of the systems approach indicates that borosilicate glasses are, overall, the most suitable glasses for the immobilization of nuclear waste. Phosphate glasses are highly durable; but the glass melts are highly corrosive and the glasses have poor thermal stability and low solubility for many waste components. High-silica glasses have good chemical durability, thermal stability, and mechanical stability, but the associated high melting temperatures increase volatilization of hazardous species in the waste. Borosilicate glasses are chemically durable and are stable both thermally and mechanically. The borosilicate melts are generally less corrosive than commercial glasses, and the melt temperature miimizes excessive volatility of hazardous species. Optimization of borosilicate waste glass formulations has led to their acceptance as the reference nuclear wasteform in the United States, United Kingdom, Belgium, Germany, France, Sweden, Switzerland, and Japan.},
doi = {},
journal = {},
number = ,
volume = ,
place = {United States},
year = {Wed Jan 01 00:00:00 EST 1986},
month = {Wed Jan 01 00:00:00 EST 1986}
}

Conference:
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