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Title: Effects of CO{sub 2} and NO{sub 3}{sup -} availability on deciduous trees: Phytochemistry and insect performance

Abstract

Increasing concentrations of atmospheric CO{sub 2} will interact with other environmental factors to influence the physiology and ecology of trees. This research evaluated how plant phytochemical responses to enriched atmospheric CO{sub 2} are affected by the availability of soil nitrate (NO{sub 3}{sup -}) and how these chemical changes alter performance of a tree-feeding folivore. Seedlings of three deciduous tree species were grown in ambient or elevated CO{sub 2} in combination with low or high soil NO{sub 3}{sup -} availability. Lymantria dispar larvae were reared on foliage (aspen and maple). Concentrations of nitrogen and soluble protein decreased, whereas concentrations of starch, condensed tannins, and ellagitannins increased, in response to elevated CO{sub 2} and/or low NO{sub 3}{sup -}. Responses of simple carbohydrates and phenolic glycosides were variable absolute (net) changes in foliar C:N ratios were greatest for aspen and least for oak, whereas relative changes were greatest for maple and least for aspen. Elevated CO{sub 2} treatments had little effect on gypsy moth development time, growth rate, or larval mass. Larvae reared on aspen foliage grown under elevated CO{sub 2} exhibited increased consumption but decreased conversion efficiencies. Gypsy moth responses to NO{sub 3}{sup -} were strongly host specific. The magnitude of insectmore » response elicited by resource-mediated shifts in host chemistry will depend on how levels of compounds with specific importance to insect fitness are affected. Relatively few true interactions occured between carbon and nitrogen availability and insect performance. Tree species frequently interacted with CO{sub 2} and/or NO{sub 3}{sup -} availability to affect both parameters. The effects of elevated atmospheric CO{sub 2} on terrestrial plant communities will depend on species composition and soil nutrient availability. 54 refs., 9 figs., 4 tabs.« less

Authors:
; ; ;  [1]
  1. Univ. of Wisconsin, Madison, WI (United States)
Publication Date:
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE
OSTI Identifier:
525878
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Resource Relation:
Journal Name: Ecology; Journal Volume: 78; Journal Issue: 1; Other Information: PBD: Jan 1997
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
56 BIOLOGY AND MEDICINE, APPLIED STUDIES; CARBON DIOXIDE; BIOLOGICAL AVAILABILITY; BIOLOGICAL EFFECTS; NITRATES; TREES; BIOCHEMISTRY; LYMANTRIA DISPAR

Citation Formats

Kinney, K.K., Lindroth, R.L., Jung, S.M., and Nordheim, E.V. Effects of CO{sub 2} and NO{sub 3}{sup -} availability on deciduous trees: Phytochemistry and insect performance. United States: N. p., 1997. Web. doi:10.1890/0012-9658(1997)078[0215:EOCANA]2.0.CO;2.
Kinney, K.K., Lindroth, R.L., Jung, S.M., & Nordheim, E.V. Effects of CO{sub 2} and NO{sub 3}{sup -} availability on deciduous trees: Phytochemistry and insect performance. United States. doi:10.1890/0012-9658(1997)078[0215:EOCANA]2.0.CO;2.
Kinney, K.K., Lindroth, R.L., Jung, S.M., and Nordheim, E.V. Wed . "Effects of CO{sub 2} and NO{sub 3}{sup -} availability on deciduous trees: Phytochemistry and insect performance". United States. doi:10.1890/0012-9658(1997)078[0215:EOCANA]2.0.CO;2.
@article{osti_525878,
title = {Effects of CO{sub 2} and NO{sub 3}{sup -} availability on deciduous trees: Phytochemistry and insect performance},
author = {Kinney, K.K. and Lindroth, R.L. and Jung, S.M. and Nordheim, E.V.},
abstractNote = {Increasing concentrations of atmospheric CO{sub 2} will interact with other environmental factors to influence the physiology and ecology of trees. This research evaluated how plant phytochemical responses to enriched atmospheric CO{sub 2} are affected by the availability of soil nitrate (NO{sub 3}{sup -}) and how these chemical changes alter performance of a tree-feeding folivore. Seedlings of three deciduous tree species were grown in ambient or elevated CO{sub 2} in combination with low or high soil NO{sub 3}{sup -} availability. Lymantria dispar larvae were reared on foliage (aspen and maple). Concentrations of nitrogen and soluble protein decreased, whereas concentrations of starch, condensed tannins, and ellagitannins increased, in response to elevated CO{sub 2} and/or low NO{sub 3}{sup -}. Responses of simple carbohydrates and phenolic glycosides were variable absolute (net) changes in foliar C:N ratios were greatest for aspen and least for oak, whereas relative changes were greatest for maple and least for aspen. Elevated CO{sub 2} treatments had little effect on gypsy moth development time, growth rate, or larval mass. Larvae reared on aspen foliage grown under elevated CO{sub 2} exhibited increased consumption but decreased conversion efficiencies. Gypsy moth responses to NO{sub 3}{sup -} were strongly host specific. The magnitude of insect response elicited by resource-mediated shifts in host chemistry will depend on how levels of compounds with specific importance to insect fitness are affected. Relatively few true interactions occured between carbon and nitrogen availability and insect performance. Tree species frequently interacted with CO{sub 2} and/or NO{sub 3}{sup -} availability to affect both parameters. The effects of elevated atmospheric CO{sub 2} on terrestrial plant communities will depend on species composition and soil nutrient availability. 54 refs., 9 figs., 4 tabs.},
doi = {10.1890/0012-9658(1997)078[0215:EOCANA]2.0.CO;2},
journal = {Ecology},
number = 1,
volume = 78,
place = {United States},
year = {Wed Jan 01 00:00:00 EST 1997},
month = {Wed Jan 01 00:00:00 EST 1997}
}