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Title: Health-hazard evaluation report HETA 89-170-2100, Northwest Vocational School, Cincinnati, Ohio

Abstract

In response to a request from the Director of Vocational Programs for the Northwest School District, an evaluation was undertaken of possible hazardous working conditions at the location. The requestor was concerned about the potential formaldehyde (50000) exposures to students and instructors from the use of formaldehyde cabinet fumigants in the Cosmetology Laboratory. The school, a single building located behind the Northwest High School, is serviced by six separate HVAC systems. The Cosmetology laboratory includes a reception area, a girls locker room/restroom, the laboratory area and dispensary room, and classroom, all serviced by a single HVAC system. Analysis indicated that inadequate amounts of fresh outside air were being delivered to the occupied space and that carbon-dioxide (124389) levels ranged from 1000 to 1300 parts per million (ppm), exceeding guidelines for indoor air quality. Measurements for formaldehyde concentration reached 2.9ppm, exceeding the short term exposure limit of 2.0ppm.

Authors:
;
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
National Inst. for Occupational Safety and Health, Cincinnati, OH (United States)
OSTI Identifier:
5229712
Report Number(s):
PB-91-212605/XAB; HETA--89-170-2100
Resource Type:
Technical Report
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
54 ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCES; 63 RADIATION, THERMAL, AND OTHER ENVIRON. POLLUTANT EFFECTS ON LIVING ORGS. AND BIOL. MAT.; FORMALDEHYDE; AIR POLLUTION MONITORING; OHIO; INDOOR AIR POLLUTION; SCHOOL BUILDINGS; DISINFECTANTS; ECOLOGICAL CONCENTRATION; ENVIRONMENTAL EXPOSURE PATHWAY; HEALTH HAZARDS; OCCUPATIONAL EXPOSURE; AIR POLLUTION; ALDEHYDES; BUILDINGS; DEVELOPED COUNTRIES; EDUCATIONAL FACILITIES; FEDERAL REGION V; GERMICIDES; HAZARDS; MONITORING; NORTH AMERICA; ORGANIC COMPOUNDS; POLLUTION; USA 540320* -- Environment, Aquatic-- Chemicals Monitoring & Transport-- (1990-); 560300 -- Chemicals Metabolism & Toxicology

Citation Formats

Almaguer, D., and Klein, M. Health-hazard evaluation report HETA 89-170-2100, Northwest Vocational School, Cincinnati, Ohio. United States: N. p., 1991. Web.
Almaguer, D., & Klein, M. Health-hazard evaluation report HETA 89-170-2100, Northwest Vocational School, Cincinnati, Ohio. United States.
Almaguer, D., and Klein, M. 1991. "Health-hazard evaluation report HETA 89-170-2100, Northwest Vocational School, Cincinnati, Ohio". United States. doi:.
@article{osti_5229712,
title = {Health-hazard evaluation report HETA 89-170-2100, Northwest Vocational School, Cincinnati, Ohio},
author = {Almaguer, D. and Klein, M.},
abstractNote = {In response to a request from the Director of Vocational Programs for the Northwest School District, an evaluation was undertaken of possible hazardous working conditions at the location. The requestor was concerned about the potential formaldehyde (50000) exposures to students and instructors from the use of formaldehyde cabinet fumigants in the Cosmetology Laboratory. The school, a single building located behind the Northwest High School, is serviced by six separate HVAC systems. The Cosmetology laboratory includes a reception area, a girls locker room/restroom, the laboratory area and dispensary room, and classroom, all serviced by a single HVAC system. Analysis indicated that inadequate amounts of fresh outside air were being delivered to the occupied space and that carbon-dioxide (124389) levels ranged from 1000 to 1300 parts per million (ppm), exceeding guidelines for indoor air quality. Measurements for formaldehyde concentration reached 2.9ppm, exceeding the short term exposure limit of 2.0ppm.},
doi = {},
journal = {},
number = ,
volume = ,
place = {United States},
year = 1991,
month = 2
}

Technical Report:
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