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Title: Traumatic amputation of the left lower renal pole in children

Abstract

Four children between 5 and 10 years old suffered traumatic amputation of the left lower renal pole following flank trauma. All patients were evaluated with excretory urography and isotope renography. The renal scan clearly demonstrated failure of perfusion of the lower renal pole and urinary extravasation, and was believed to be more valuable than the standard excretory urogram as a diagnostic tool. All children were managed similarly: delayed (72 to 96 hours) exploration, simple removal of the amputated segment and insertion of a Penrose drain. They all have done well. The patients were normotensive at followup and had excellent function of the remaining portion of the kidney.

Authors:
; ;
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Children's Hospital National Medical Center, WA
OSTI Identifier:
5219708
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Resource Relation:
Journal Name: J. Urol.; (United States); Journal Volume: 1
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
62 RADIOLOGY AND NUCLEAR MEDICINE; KIDNEYS; RADIOISOTOPE SCANNING; CHILDREN; DTPA; PATIENTS; PERFUSED ORGANS; TECHNETIUM; AGE GROUPS; AMINO ACIDS; BODY; CARBOXYLIC ACIDS; CHELATING AGENTS; COUNTING TECHNIQUES; DRUGS; ELEMENTS; METALS; ORGANIC ACIDS; ORGANIC COMPOUNDS; ORGANS; RADIOPROTECTIVE SUBSTANCES; TRANSITION ELEMENTS; 550601* - Medicine- Unsealed Radionuclides in Diagnostics

Citation Formats

Waxman, J., Belman, A.B., and Kass, E.J. Traumatic amputation of the left lower renal pole in children. United States: N. p., 1985. Web.
Waxman, J., Belman, A.B., & Kass, E.J. Traumatic amputation of the left lower renal pole in children. United States.
Waxman, J., Belman, A.B., and Kass, E.J. 1985. "Traumatic amputation of the left lower renal pole in children". United States. doi:.
@article{osti_5219708,
title = {Traumatic amputation of the left lower renal pole in children},
author = {Waxman, J. and Belman, A.B. and Kass, E.J.},
abstractNote = {Four children between 5 and 10 years old suffered traumatic amputation of the left lower renal pole following flank trauma. All patients were evaluated with excretory urography and isotope renography. The renal scan clearly demonstrated failure of perfusion of the lower renal pole and urinary extravasation, and was believed to be more valuable than the standard excretory urogram as a diagnostic tool. All children were managed similarly: delayed (72 to 96 hours) exploration, simple removal of the amputated segment and insertion of a Penrose drain. They all have done well. The patients were normotensive at followup and had excellent function of the remaining portion of the kidney.},
doi = {},
journal = {J. Urol.; (United States)},
number = ,
volume = 1,
place = {United States},
year = 1985,
month = 7
}
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