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Title: Absorbed doses from temporomandibular joint radiography

Abstract

Thermoluminescent dosimeters were used in a tissue-equivalent phantom to measure doses of radiation absorbed by various structures in the head when the temporomandibular joint was examined by four different radiographic techniques--the transcranial, transorbital, and sigmoid notch (Parma) projections and the lateral tomograph. The highest doses of radiation occurred at the point of entry for the x-ray beam, ranging from 112 mrad for the transorbital view to 990 mrad for the sigmoid notch view. Only the transorbital projection a radiation dose to the lens of the eye. Of the four techniques evaluated, the lateral tomograph produced the highest doses to the pituitary gland and the bone marrow, while the sigmoid notch radiograph produced the highest doses to the parotid gland.

Authors:
;
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Univ. of Michigan, Ann Arbor
OSTI Identifier:
5211998
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Resource Relation:
Journal Name: Oral Surg., Oral Med., Oral Pathol.; (United States); Journal Volume: 6
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
61 RADIATION PROTECTION AND DOSIMETRY; TISSUE-EQUIVALENT MATERIALS; RADIATION DOSES; BONE MARROW; EYES; HEAD; PHANTOMS; PITUITARY GLAND; THERMOLUMINESCENT DOSIMETRY; X RADIATION; ANIMAL TISSUES; BODY; BODY AREAS; DOSES; DOSIMETRY; ELECTROMAGNETIC RADIATION; ENDOCRINE GLANDS; FACE; GLANDS; HEMATOPOIETIC SYSTEM; IONIZING RADIATIONS; MATERIALS; MOCKUP; ORGANS; RADIATIONS; SENSE ORGANS; STRUCTURAL MODELS; TISSUES; 655003* - Medical Physics- Dosimetry

Citation Formats

Brooks, S.L., and Lanzetta, M.L. Absorbed doses from temporomandibular joint radiography. United States: N. p., 1985. Web. doi:10.1016/0030-4220(85)90197-5.
Brooks, S.L., & Lanzetta, M.L. Absorbed doses from temporomandibular joint radiography. United States. doi:10.1016/0030-4220(85)90197-5.
Brooks, S.L., and Lanzetta, M.L. 1985. "Absorbed doses from temporomandibular joint radiography". United States. doi:10.1016/0030-4220(85)90197-5.
@article{osti_5211998,
title = {Absorbed doses from temporomandibular joint radiography},
author = {Brooks, S.L. and Lanzetta, M.L.},
abstractNote = {Thermoluminescent dosimeters were used in a tissue-equivalent phantom to measure doses of radiation absorbed by various structures in the head when the temporomandibular joint was examined by four different radiographic techniques--the transcranial, transorbital, and sigmoid notch (Parma) projections and the lateral tomograph. The highest doses of radiation occurred at the point of entry for the x-ray beam, ranging from 112 mrad for the transorbital view to 990 mrad for the sigmoid notch view. Only the transorbital projection a radiation dose to the lens of the eye. Of the four techniques evaluated, the lateral tomograph produced the highest doses to the pituitary gland and the bone marrow, while the sigmoid notch radiograph produced the highest doses to the parotid gland.},
doi = {10.1016/0030-4220(85)90197-5},
journal = {Oral Surg., Oral Med., Oral Pathol.; (United States)},
number = ,
volume = 6,
place = {United States},
year = 1985,
month = 6
}
  • Lateral transcranial radiographs are commonly used to evaluate TMJ morphology and function. This study evaluated the use of four TMJ positioners in controlling the amount of radiation absorbed at predetermined sites on a phantom head. Use of positioners and collimators can reduce the amount of radiation exposure.
  • The absorbed doses and energy imparted from radiographic examinations of children, using panoramic tomography (PTG), cephalometric radiography (CPR), and maxillary frontal occlusal overview (FOO), were examined. The absorbed dose at various sites of the head were measured with TL dosimeters in a phantom and in patients. The energy imparted was calculated from measurements of areal exposure using a planparallel ionization chamber. The maximum absorbed doses for panoramic tomography were located around the lateral rotation center, for cephalometric radiography in the left (tube side) parotid region, and for frontal occlusal radiography in the nose. The absorbed doses in the eyes, thyroidmore » gland, and skin are discussed and compared with previous reports and, for the most part, are found to be in agreement. The mean energy imparted from all three examination methods is 5 mJ with about 57 percent from panoramic, 33 percent from cephalometric, and 10 percent from frontal occlusal examinations. The energy imparted from cephalometric radiography can be reduced to about 10 percent with the use of an improved examination technique, leaving panoramic tomography responsible for contributing about 80 percent of the total energy imparted.« less
  • Thermoluminescent dosimetry studies were performed on a Rando Humanoid head phantom to compare radiation dosages used in temporomandibular joint examinations. Studies included transaxial and direct sagittal high-resolution CT, reduced milliamperage dynamic CT, tomoarthrography, pluridirectional and linear tomography, pantomography, transcranial plain films, and fluoroscopy. Radiation doses were determined for the brain, lens, pituitary gland, condylar marrow, and thyroid gland. Condylar marrow received doses of 64 and 52 mGy, respectively, for the GE 9800 and 8800 high-resolution scans; 21 and 17 mGy, respectively, for the dynamically sequenced scans; and 26 mGy for the GE 9800 direct sagittal sections. Tomoarthrography yielded 31 mGymore » and fluoroscopy 12 mGy. Other lower doses showed 5 mGy for polytomography, 3 mGy for ipsilateral joint linear tomography, 1.9 mGy for the GE 9800 slow ScoutView, 1.8 mGy for xeroradiography, 0.9 mGy for contralateral joint linear tomography, 0.3-0.4 mGy for transcranial plain films and pantomography, and 0.2 mGy for the GE 8800 ScoutView. The estimated error in this study was calculated to be +/- 15%. On a relative scale, the radiation doses from high-resolution CT and tomoarthrography are high, dynamic CT yields a medium dose, and all other tomographic and plain-film techniques yield low doses.« less