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Title: Cell survival kinetics in peripheral blood and bone marrow during total body irradiation for marrow transplantation

Abstract

Cell survival kinetics in both peripheral blood and in bone marrow have been studied over the time course of hyperfractionated total body irradiation (TBI) for bone marrow transplantation. Our unique TBI regimen allows the study of the in vivo radiation effect uncomplicated by prior cyclophosphamide, since this agent is given after TBI in our cytoreduction scheme. Peripheral blood cell concentrations were monitored with conventional laboratory cell counts and differentials. Absolute bone marrow cell concentrations were monitored by measuring cell concentrations in an aspirate sample and correcting for dilution with blood by a cell cycle kinetic method using cytofluorometry. For lymphocytes in peripheral blood in patients in remission, the effective D/sub 0/ ranged from 373 rad in 10 children less than or equal to 10 y old, to 536 rad in the four patients between 11 to 17 y old, while n = 1.0 in all groups. There was no trend observed according to age. Granulocytes had a much higher effective D/sub 0/, approximately 1000 rad in vivo. Absolute nucleated cell concentration in marrow dropped slowly initially, due to an increased lymphocyte concentration in marrow during a concurrent drop in lymphocyte concentration in peripheral blood, but eventually fell on the lastmore » day of TBI ranging from 7 to 44% of the initial marrow nucleated cell concentration. Marrow myeloid elements, however, dropped continuously throughout the course of TBI.« less

Authors:
; ;
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, NY
OSTI Identifier:
5211575
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Resource Relation:
Journal Name: Int. J. Radiat. Oncol., Biol. Phys.; (United States); Journal Volume: 9:11
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
63 RADIATION, THERMAL, AND OTHER ENVIRON. POLLUTANT EFFECTS ON LIVING ORGS. AND BIOL. MAT.; 62 RADIOLOGY AND NUCLEAR MEDICINE; BLOOD CELLS; BIOLOGICAL RADIATION EFFECTS; POPULATION DYNAMICS; BONE MARROW CELLS; RADIOTHERAPY; SIDE EFFECTS; BLOOD COUNT; CELL FLOW SYSTEMS; FRACTIONATED IRRADIATION; HARD X RADIATION; LEUKEMIA; LYMPHOCYTES; PATIENTS; TRANSPLANTS; WHOLE-BODY IRRADIATION; ANIMAL CELLS; BIOLOGICAL EFFECTS; BIOLOGICAL MATERIALS; BLOOD; BODY FLUIDS; CONNECTIVE TISSUE CELLS; DISEASES; ELECTROMAGNETIC RADIATION; EXTERNAL IRRADIATION; HEMIC DISEASES; IONIZING RADIATIONS; IRRADIATION; LEUKOCYTES; MATERIALS; MEDICINE; NEOPLASMS; NUCLEAR MEDICINE; RADIATION EFFECTS; RADIATIONS; RADIOLOGY; SOMATIC CELLS; THERAPY; X RADIATION; 560151* - Radiation Effects on Animals- Man; 560121 - Radiation Effects on Cells- External Source- (-1987); 550603 - Medicine- External Radiation in Therapy- (1980-)

Citation Formats

Shank, B., Andreeff, M., and Li, D. Cell survival kinetics in peripheral blood and bone marrow during total body irradiation for marrow transplantation. United States: N. p., 1983. Web. doi:10.1016/0360-3016(83)90413-3.
Shank, B., Andreeff, M., & Li, D. Cell survival kinetics in peripheral blood and bone marrow during total body irradiation for marrow transplantation. United States. doi:10.1016/0360-3016(83)90413-3.
Shank, B., Andreeff, M., and Li, D. 1983. "Cell survival kinetics in peripheral blood and bone marrow during total body irradiation for marrow transplantation". United States. doi:10.1016/0360-3016(83)90413-3.
@article{osti_5211575,
title = {Cell survival kinetics in peripheral blood and bone marrow during total body irradiation for marrow transplantation},
author = {Shank, B. and Andreeff, M. and Li, D.},
abstractNote = {Cell survival kinetics in both peripheral blood and in bone marrow have been studied over the time course of hyperfractionated total body irradiation (TBI) for bone marrow transplantation. Our unique TBI regimen allows the study of the in vivo radiation effect uncomplicated by prior cyclophosphamide, since this agent is given after TBI in our cytoreduction scheme. Peripheral blood cell concentrations were monitored with conventional laboratory cell counts and differentials. Absolute bone marrow cell concentrations were monitored by measuring cell concentrations in an aspirate sample and correcting for dilution with blood by a cell cycle kinetic method using cytofluorometry. For lymphocytes in peripheral blood in patients in remission, the effective D/sub 0/ ranged from 373 rad in 10 children less than or equal to 10 y old, to 536 rad in the four patients between 11 to 17 y old, while n = 1.0 in all groups. There was no trend observed according to age. Granulocytes had a much higher effective D/sub 0/, approximately 1000 rad in vivo. Absolute nucleated cell concentration in marrow dropped slowly initially, due to an increased lymphocyte concentration in marrow during a concurrent drop in lymphocyte concentration in peripheral blood, but eventually fell on the last day of TBI ranging from 7 to 44% of the initial marrow nucleated cell concentration. Marrow myeloid elements, however, dropped continuously throughout the course of TBI.},
doi = {10.1016/0360-3016(83)90413-3},
journal = {Int. J. Radiat. Oncol., Biol. Phys.; (United States)},
number = ,
volume = 9:11,
place = {United States},
year = 1983,
month =
}
  • Bone marrow transplantation has often been closely linked with accidental or intentional therapeutical irradiation. In both situations, study of the radiosensitivity of human blood cell subsets is of interest. Using one-color flow cytometry analysis of B lymphocytes, T cell subsets, and natural killer cells, we previously reported that lymphocyte subsets exhibit equal radiosensitivity. Taking advantage of recent developments in the knowledge of leukocyte differentiation antigens and flow cytometry technology we undertook a study of blood cell subsets to search for rare populations exhibiting different radiosensitivity. Thirty patients, who were delivered a 12 Gy fractionated total body irradiation as part ofmore » their conditioning regimen before transplantation for malignant disorders, were studied using multicolor flow cytometry. T and B lymphocytes showed a sharp, radiation-induced decrease, with the B lymphocytes (cluster of differentiation (CD) 19+) being the most sensitive. When analyzed by multicolor flow cytometry all major lymphocyte subsets appeared equally sensitive to the in vivo irradiation. Therefore, all major lymphocyte subsets sharing the helper phenotype (naive or memory) and the cytotoxic phenotype appeared equally sensitive to in vivo whole body irradiation. In parallel, the CD34+ cell subset remained basically unchanged after whole body irradiation. Finally, the CD3{minus}, 56+, 16+ natural killer cell subset was relatively radioresistant (91 and 74% of its initial value, after 2 and 4 Gy, respectively) as compared to other lymphocyte subsets. Our study provides evidence that T and B cell subsets seem to be highly radiosensitive in vivo. The CD34+ progenitor/stem cells and NK cells seem to be more radioresistant. This latter result might provide clues to the understanding of the pathophysiogeny of radiation-induced aplasia and of the engrafment/rejection process following bone marrow transplantation. 20 refs., 3 figs., 1 tab.« less
  • The capacity of busulfan and total body irradiation to ablate hematopoietic stem cells as preparation for the allogeneic bone marrow transplantation of patients with congenital bone marrow disorders was studied. Fourteen patients received 18 transplants; busulfan was used in the preparatory regimen of eight transplants and total body irradiation in the regimens of six transplants. Sustained hematopoietic ablation was achieved in six of eight patients prepared with busulfan and in all six patients prepared with total body irradiation. Three patients prepared with total body irradiation died with idiopathic interstitial pneumonitis, whereas no patients receiving busulfan developed interstitial pneumonitis. The optimalmore » antihematopoietic stem cell agent to be used for the preparation of patients with congenital bone marrow disorder for bone marrow transplantation is not certain.« less
  • Techniques are described for /sup 60/Co irradiation of beagles and transplantation of bone marrow and lungs. Eight pairs of animals that were treated with lethal irradiation, marrow transplantation, and methotrexate were alive after 68 to 245 days. Biopsies revealed normal transplanted lungs. Results indicated that the combination of treatments was significant since survival was markedly increased over various control series receiving lesser degrees of therapy or none. (HLW)
  • We evaluated the effects of 16,16-dimethyl prostaglandin E2 (dm-PGE2), with and without syngeneic bone marrow transplantation (BMT) on the survival and hematopoietic recovery of mice given 14-20 Gy total body irradiation (TBI). Survival of mice given combined dm-PGE2 and BMT was improved significantly over that of mice given either treatment alone. The 30-day survival after 14, 15, 16 or 18 Gy TBI for combined treatment was 97, 90, 20 or 10 percent, respectively. The corresponding 30-day survival rates for mice given BMT alone were 69, 60, 7 or 0 percent, respectively. For dm-PGE2 alone, 30-day survival was 63, 20, 10more » or 0 percent, respectively. Deaths in both dm-PGE2 treated groups generally occurred after day 10 whereas deaths in the BMT group occurred before day 10. All irradiated controls were dead on or before day 10; after larger doses, deaths clustered around day 5. After 20 Gy TBI, all mice in all groups were dead by day 7. Studies of white blood cell recovery 1-9 days after 14 Gy TBI showed improvement with BMT, whereas dm-PGE2 did not enhance recovery. Nucleated cells per humerus, spleen weight, and spleen iron uptake (erythropoiesis) were also improved by BMT but not dm-PGE2.« less