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Title: Estrogens and development

Abstract

The normal development of the genital organs of mammals, including humans, is under hormonal control. A role for the female sex hormone estrogen in this process is still unclear. However, exposure of experimental animals or humans to the potent exogenous estrogen, diethylstilbestrol (DES), results in persistent differentiation effects. Since many chemicals in the environment are weakly estrogenic, the possibility of hormonally altered differentiation must be considered.

Authors:
;
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences, Research Triangle Park, NC (USA)
OSTI Identifier:
5193868
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Journal Name:
Environ. Health Perspect.; (United States)
Additional Journal Information:
Journal Volume: 75
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
63 RADIATION, THERMAL, AND OTHER ENVIRON. POLLUTANT EFFECTS ON LIVING ORGS. AND BIOL. MAT.; ESTROGENS; BIOLOGICAL EFFECTS; FEMALE GENITALS; ONTOGENESIS; MALE GENITALS; STILBESTROL; CELL DIFFERENTIATION; PHYSIOLOGY; REPRODUCTIVE DISORDERS; WOMEN; ANIMALS; AROMATICS; BODY; FEMALES; HORMONES; HYDROXY COMPOUNDS; MAMMALS; MAN; ORGANIC COMPOUNDS; ORGANS; PHENOLS; POLYPHENOLS; PRIMATES; STEROID HORMONES; VERTEBRATES; 560300* - Chemicals Metabolism & Toxicology

Citation Formats

McLachlan, J.A., and Newbold, R.R. Estrogens and development. United States: N. p., 1987. Web. doi:10.1289/ehp.877525.
McLachlan, J.A., & Newbold, R.R. Estrogens and development. United States. doi:10.1289/ehp.877525.
McLachlan, J.A., and Newbold, R.R. Sun . "Estrogens and development". United States. doi:10.1289/ehp.877525.
@article{osti_5193868,
title = {Estrogens and development},
author = {McLachlan, J.A. and Newbold, R.R.},
abstractNote = {The normal development of the genital organs of mammals, including humans, is under hormonal control. A role for the female sex hormone estrogen in this process is still unclear. However, exposure of experimental animals or humans to the potent exogenous estrogen, diethylstilbestrol (DES), results in persistent differentiation effects. Since many chemicals in the environment are weakly estrogenic, the possibility of hormonally altered differentiation must be considered.},
doi = {10.1289/ehp.877525},
journal = {Environ. Health Perspect.; (United States)},
number = ,
volume = 75,
place = {United States},
year = {1987},
month = {11}
}