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Title: Sediment bioassays with oyster larvae

Abstract

Tests with naturally-occurring sediments are rare and sediment testing methodology is not standardized. The authors present a simple methodology for undertaking sediment bioassays with oyster larvae, and present data from a recent study to prove the utility of this method.

Authors:
;
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
E.V.S. Consultants Ltd., North Vancouver, British Columbia
OSTI Identifier:
5149643
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Resource Relation:
Journal Name: Bull. Environ. Contam. Toxicol.; (United States); Journal Volume: 31:4
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
54 ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCES; 63 RADIATION, THERMAL, AND OTHER ENVIRON. POLLUTANT EFFECTS ON LIVING ORGS. AND BIOL. MAT.; LARVAE; MORTALITY; SEDIMENTS; BIOASSAY; WATER QUALITY; BIOLOGICAL INDICATORS; EXPERIMENTAL DATA; OYSTERS; PUGET SOUND; ANIMALS; AQUATIC ORGANISMS; DATA; ENVIRONMENTAL QUALITY; INFORMATION; INVERTEBRATES; MOLLUSCS; NUMERICAL DATA; PACIFIC OCEAN; SEAS; SURFACE WATERS; 520100* - Environment, Aquatic- Basic Studies- (-1989); 560304 - Chemicals Metabolism & Toxicology- Invertebrates- (-1987)

Citation Formats

Chapman, P.M., and Morgan, J.D.. Sediment bioassays with oyster larvae. United States: N. p., 1983. Web. doi:10.1007/BF01622275.
Chapman, P.M., & Morgan, J.D.. Sediment bioassays with oyster larvae. United States. doi:10.1007/BF01622275.
Chapman, P.M., and Morgan, J.D.. 1983. "Sediment bioassays with oyster larvae". United States. doi:10.1007/BF01622275.
@article{osti_5149643,
title = {Sediment bioassays with oyster larvae},
author = {Chapman, P.M. and Morgan, J.D.},
abstractNote = {Tests with naturally-occurring sediments are rare and sediment testing methodology is not standardized. The authors present a simple methodology for undertaking sediment bioassays with oyster larvae, and present data from a recent study to prove the utility of this method.},
doi = {10.1007/BF01622275},
journal = {Bull. Environ. Contam. Toxicol.; (United States)},
number = ,
volume = 31:4,
place = {United States},
year = 1983,
month =
}
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  • The eastern oyster (Crassostrea virginica) developed neoplastic disorders when experimentally exposed both in the laboratory and field to chemically contaminated sediment from Black Rock Harbor (BRH), Bridgeport, Connecticut. Neoplasia was observed in oysters after 30 or 60 days of continuous exposure in a laboratory flow-through system to a 20 mg/L suspension of BRH sediment plus postexposure periods of 3, 30, or 60 days. Composite tumor incidence was 13.6% for both exposures. Tumor occurrence was highest in the renal excretory epithelium, followed in order by gill, gonad, gastrointestinal, heart, and embryonic neural tissue. Regression of experimental neoplasia was not observed whenmore » the stimulus was discontinued. In field experiments, gill neoplasms developed in oysters, deployed in cages for 30 days at BRH and 36 days at a BRH dredge material disposal area in Central Long Island Sound, and kidney and gastrointestinal neoplasms developed in caged oysters deployed 40 days in Quincy Bay, Boston Harbor. Oysters exposed to BRH sediment in the laboratory and in the field accumulated high concentrations of polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs), polyaromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs), and chlorinated pesticides. Chemical analyses demonstrated high concentrations of PCBs, PAHs, chlorinated pesticides, and heavy metals in BRH sediment. Known genotoxic carcinogens, cocarcinogens, and tumor promoters were present as contaminants. The uptake of parent PAH and PCBs from BRH sediment observed in oysters also occurs in blue mussels (Mytilus edulis). Winter flounder fed BRH-contaminated blue mussels contained xenobiotic chemicals analyzed in mussels. The flounder developed renal and pancreatic neoplasms and hepatotoxic neoplastic precursor lesions, demonstrating trophic transfer of sediment-bound carcinogens up the food chain.« less
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