skip to main content
OSTI.GOV title logo U.S. Department of Energy
Office of Scientific and Technical Information

Title: Optical signature utilization of remote sensing of nearshore waters

Abstract

Existing satellite sensors lack the spectral capabilities to discriminate phytoplankton pigments in water bodies. New satellite sensors (EOS planned for 1998 and SeaWIFS forthcoming) with narrow bandwidths can provide detailed spectral resolution necessary to distinguish optical properties of nearshore waters provided calibrated seatruth data are available. This will facilitate utility of spaceborne water color sensors for discrimination of bloom forming phytoplankton species and support oceanographic/coastal zone remote sensing missions of NASA, Navy and other agencies. The objective of the research was to develop a library of absorption spectra for the most common phytoplankton found locally within the Hudson/Raritan Estuary. Both culture grown and field samples of phytoplankton were concentrated and analyzed using standard techniques. Chlorophyll-a and phaeopigment concentrations were determined based on spectrometric analysis, producing characteristic absorption spectra. To further refine and discriminate pigment compositions which affect remote color sensing recorded by sensors, spectral derivative and polynomial regression analysis were applied to the absorption spectra. Using these models, it was possible to identify optimum wavelengths characterizing pigment compositions of phytoplankton species in the estuary. Future work will integrate the spectral library into GenIsis--hyperspectral image processing to establish correlation with remotely sensed data.

Authors:
; ;  [1]
  1. New Jersey Institute of Technology, Newark, NJ (United States) [and others
Publication Date:
OSTI Identifier:
508174
Report Number(s):
CONF-960384-
TRN: 97:002803-0003
Resource Type:
Conference
Resource Relation:
Conference: Nomadic computing and communications conference: creating a new era in mobile communications, San Jose, CA (United States), 13-15 Mar 1996; Other Information: PBD: 1997; Related Information: Is Part Of Proceedings of the fourth international conference on remote sensing for marine and coastal environments. Technology and applications: Volume II; PB: 671 p.
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
54 ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCES; PHYTOPLANKTON; ABSORPTION SPECTRA; PIGMENTS; WAVELENGTHS; HUDSON RIVER; ESTUARIES; COLOR

Citation Formats

Bagheri, S., Dios, R.A., and Pan, Zhengxiang. Optical signature utilization of remote sensing of nearshore waters. United States: N. p., 1997. Web.
Bagheri, S., Dios, R.A., & Pan, Zhengxiang. Optical signature utilization of remote sensing of nearshore waters. United States.
Bagheri, S., Dios, R.A., and Pan, Zhengxiang. 1997. "Optical signature utilization of remote sensing of nearshore waters". United States. doi:.
@article{osti_508174,
title = {Optical signature utilization of remote sensing of nearshore waters},
author = {Bagheri, S. and Dios, R.A. and Pan, Zhengxiang},
abstractNote = {Existing satellite sensors lack the spectral capabilities to discriminate phytoplankton pigments in water bodies. New satellite sensors (EOS planned for 1998 and SeaWIFS forthcoming) with narrow bandwidths can provide detailed spectral resolution necessary to distinguish optical properties of nearshore waters provided calibrated seatruth data are available. This will facilitate utility of spaceborne water color sensors for discrimination of bloom forming phytoplankton species and support oceanographic/coastal zone remote sensing missions of NASA, Navy and other agencies. The objective of the research was to develop a library of absorption spectra for the most common phytoplankton found locally within the Hudson/Raritan Estuary. Both culture grown and field samples of phytoplankton were concentrated and analyzed using standard techniques. Chlorophyll-a and phaeopigment concentrations were determined based on spectrometric analysis, producing characteristic absorption spectra. To further refine and discriminate pigment compositions which affect remote color sensing recorded by sensors, spectral derivative and polynomial regression analysis were applied to the absorption spectra. Using these models, it was possible to identify optimum wavelengths characterizing pigment compositions of phytoplankton species in the estuary. Future work will integrate the spectral library into GenIsis--hyperspectral image processing to establish correlation with remotely sensed data.},
doi = {},
journal = {},
number = ,
volume = ,
place = {United States},
year = 1997,
month = 8
}

Conference:
Other availability
Please see Document Availability for additional information on obtaining the full-text document. Library patrons may search WorldCat to identify libraries that hold this conference proceeding.

Save / Share:
  • In the ocean, typical concentrations of suspended particulates are between 10 and 200 mg/liter (1 mg/liter = 10{sup 6} kg/m{sup 3} is approximately 1.1 ton/km{sup 3}). Light scattering nephelometers have been used for over 15 years to infer concentration and particulate perturbations. The nephelometers are sensitive to about particle concentration of 1--2 mg/liter. These particle concentrations can also be remotely sensored by ocean penetrating lidar. The particulate concentrations relate to the turbidity of the water, increasing the backscattering and attenuation of incident laser radiation; the attenuation is, usually characterized by ``K``, the diffuse attenuation coefficient. By appropriate processing of themore » lidar return waveforms, the authors can remotely infer the K, and thus the particulate concentrations -- to a few mg/liter.« less
  • Deriving thematic maps of water quality parameters from a remote sensing image requires a number of processing steps, such as calibration, atmospheric correction, air-water interface correction, and application of water quality algorithms. A prototype version of an integrated software environment has recently been developed that enables the user to perform and control these processing steps. Major parts of this environment are: (i) access to the MODTRAN 3 radiative transfer code, (ii) a database of water quality algorithms, and (iii) a spectral library of Dutch coastal and inland waters, containing subsurface irradiance reflectance spectra and associated water quality parameters. The atmosphericmore » correction part of this environment is discussed here. It is shown that this part can be used to accurately retrieve spectral signatures of inland water for wavelengths between 450 and 750 nm, provided in situ measurements are used to determine atmospheric model parameters. Assessment of the usefulness of the completely integrated software system in an operational environment requires a revised version that is presently being developed.« less
  • Deriving thematic maps of water quality parameters from a remote sensing image requires a number of processing steps, such as calibration, atmospheric correction, air/water interface correction, and application of water quality algorithms. A prototype software environment has recently been developed that enables the user to perform and control these processing steps. Main parts of this environment are: (i) access to the MODTRAN 3 radiative transfer code for removing atmospheric and air-water interface influences, (ii) a tool for analyzing of algorithms for estimating water quality and (iii) a spectral database, containing apparent and inherent optical properties and associated water quality parameters.more » The use of the software is illustrated by applying implemented algorithms for estimating chlorophyll to data from a spectral library of Dutch inland waters with CHL ranging from 1 to 500 pg 1{sup -1}. The algorithms currently implemented in the Toolkit software are recommended for optically simple waters, but for optically complex waters development of more advanced retrieval methods is required.« less
  • We have developed and tested onboard a helicopter Kamov-32 and a ship a versatile lidar system for monitoring the water pollution by oil products and dissolved organic matter as well and for measuring the concentration of chlorophyll {open_quotes}a{close_quotes} of phytoplankton in the ocean {open_quotes}effective{close_quotes} subsurface layer. This system can be also used for shallow sea bathymetry and for studying the physiological state of green plants and the elemental content of soil. The lidar setup includes: a Nd:YAG laser with frequency doubling (second harmonic pulse energy 200 mJ, pulse duration 10 ns, repetition rate 10 Hz); a receiving-transmitting device with amore » mirror telescope of 15 cm diameter; a polychromator; and a recording system consisting of a gated light amplifier and a CCD camera cooled to -10 C. The field experimental data on surface chlorophyll distribution and oil spills in the Black Sea and Guanabara Bay are presented.« less
  • This paper reviews the theoretical and technological basis for determining some of the properties of the auroral ionosphere by optical remote-sensing techniques. Spectrophotometer and imaging experiments are described which provide detailed, quantitative information on properties of the E region: total energy deposited, ion pair production rate, electron density, and height-integrated Hall and Pederson conductivities. Examples of these measurements are given and compared with equivalent measurements made using the Chatanika incoherent scatter radar. It is shown that measurements made with spectrophotometric methods compare well in accuracy with the radar measurements.