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Title: Carcinogens and cancers in freshwater fishes

Abstract

Epizootics of neoplasms in freshwater fish species are considered in relation to circumstantial and experimental evidence that suggest that some epizootics of neoplasia of hepatocellular, cholangiocellular, epidermal, and oral epithelial origin may be causally related to contaminant exposure. Although there is concern for the safety of consuming fish affected with neoplasms, this concern may be misdirected as direct transmission of cancer by ingesting cancerous tissue would seem unlikely. Of greater concern is the matter of toxic and cancer-causing chemicals present in edible fish that exhibit neoplasia as a symptom of past exposure via residence in a polluted waterway. There is ample evidence to suggest that contaminant chemicals ingested via contaminated Great Lakes fish may already be affecting both human and ecosystem health, but these effects are subtle and may require new approaches to the study of the affected systems.

Authors:
 [1];  [2]
  1. (Roswell Park Memorial Inst., Buffalo, NY (United States))
  2. (Ohio State Univ., Columbus (United States))
Publication Date:
OSTI Identifier:
5017028
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Resource Relation:
Journal Name: Environmental Health Perspectives; (United States); Journal Volume: 90
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
63 RADIATION, THERMAL, AND OTHER ENVIRON. POLLUTANT EFFECTS ON LIVING ORGS. AND BIOL. MAT.; CARCINOGENS; INGESTION; POLYCYCLIC AROMATIC HYDROCARBONS; BIOLOGICAL EFFECTS; CARCINOGENESIS; ENVIRONMENTAL EXPOSURE; FISHES; GREAT LAKES; HEALTH HAZARDS; LIVER; ANIMALS; AQUATIC ORGANISMS; AROMATICS; BODY; DIGESTIVE SYSTEM; GLANDS; HAZARDS; HYDROCARBONS; INTAKE; LAKES; ORGANIC COMPOUNDS; ORGANS; PATHOGENESIS; SURFACE WATERS; VERTEBRATES; 560300* - Chemicals Metabolism & Toxicology

Citation Formats

Black, J.J., and Baumann, P.C. Carcinogens and cancers in freshwater fishes. United States: N. p., 1991. Web. doi:10.2307/3430842.
Black, J.J., & Baumann, P.C. Carcinogens and cancers in freshwater fishes. United States. doi:10.2307/3430842.
Black, J.J., and Baumann, P.C. 1991. "Carcinogens and cancers in freshwater fishes". United States. doi:10.2307/3430842.
@article{osti_5017028,
title = {Carcinogens and cancers in freshwater fishes},
author = {Black, J.J. and Baumann, P.C.},
abstractNote = {Epizootics of neoplasms in freshwater fish species are considered in relation to circumstantial and experimental evidence that suggest that some epizootics of neoplasia of hepatocellular, cholangiocellular, epidermal, and oral epithelial origin may be causally related to contaminant exposure. Although there is concern for the safety of consuming fish affected with neoplasms, this concern may be misdirected as direct transmission of cancer by ingesting cancerous tissue would seem unlikely. Of greater concern is the matter of toxic and cancer-causing chemicals present in edible fish that exhibit neoplasia as a symptom of past exposure via residence in a polluted waterway. There is ample evidence to suggest that contaminant chemicals ingested via contaminated Great Lakes fish may already be affecting both human and ecosystem health, but these effects are subtle and may require new approaches to the study of the affected systems.},
doi = {10.2307/3430842},
journal = {Environmental Health Perspectives; (United States)},
number = ,
volume = 90,
place = {United States},
year = 1991,
month = 1
}
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