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Title: Los Alamos strategic defense research and the ABM (Anti-Ballistic Missile) Treaty

Abstract

This report reviews the restrictions placed on Los Alamos strategic defense by current arms control treaty agreements, including controversies about the correct interpretation of the major treaty at issue, the Anti-Ballistic Missile Treaty; and it assesses the current status of the most significant Los Alamos strategic defense programs in terms of their compliance with that Treaty, and others. 7 tabs.

Authors:
;
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Los Alamos National Lab., NM (USA). Center for National Security Studies
OSTI Identifier:
5002686
Report Number(s):
LA-11262-MS
ON: DE88011505
DOE Contract Number:
W-7405-ENG-36
Resource Type:
Technical Report
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
98 NUCLEAR DISARMAMENT, SAFEGUARDS, AND PHYSICAL PROTECTION; ARMS CONTROL; TREATIES; LASL; RESEARCH PROGRAMS; BALLISTIC MISSILE DEFENSE; MISSILES; NATIONAL DEFENSE; NATIONAL ORGANIZATIONS; US AEC; US DOE; US ERDA; US ORGANIZATIONS; 350101* - Arms Control- Policy, Negotiations, & Legislation- Treaties- (1987-)

Citation Formats

Morales, R., and Pendley, R.E.. Los Alamos strategic defense research and the ABM (Anti-Ballistic Missile) Treaty. United States: N. p., 1988. Web.
Morales, R., & Pendley, R.E.. Los Alamos strategic defense research and the ABM (Anti-Ballistic Missile) Treaty. United States.
Morales, R., and Pendley, R.E.. 1988. "Los Alamos strategic defense research and the ABM (Anti-Ballistic Missile) Treaty". United States. doi:.
@article{osti_5002686,
title = {Los Alamos strategic defense research and the ABM (Anti-Ballistic Missile) Treaty},
author = {Morales, R. and Pendley, R.E.},
abstractNote = {This report reviews the restrictions placed on Los Alamos strategic defense by current arms control treaty agreements, including controversies about the correct interpretation of the major treaty at issue, the Anti-Ballistic Missile Treaty; and it assesses the current status of the most significant Los Alamos strategic defense programs in terms of their compliance with that Treaty, and others. 7 tabs.},
doi = {},
journal = {},
number = ,
volume = ,
place = {United States},
year = 1988,
month = 4
}

Technical Report:
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  • This study examines how the ABM Treaty restraints and the arms control process that was a logical continuation of the ABM Treaty have effected US ballistic-missile defense programs from 1972 to 1986, including the Strategic Defense Initiative. It provides a thorough analysis of US ABM Treaty negotiating objectives and outcomes, concluding that the conceptual linkage between offense and defense established early in SALT was broken and never reforged in later negotiations or agreements. It examines how Soviet views of strategic defense differ from the US, and how those views are reflected in Soviet strategic defense programs. It concludes that themore » Soviet understanding is diametrically opposed to the US view of the ABM Treaty, and that this has contributed to the great disparity in strategic defense effort since the signing of the Treaty. Finally, US BMD programs are examined in detail both to set out a general history of their development and to examine specifically the ABM Treaty's effect on that development. US Programs were effected by the ABM Treaty's logic and spirit as much as they were constrained by specific limitations. The Strategic Defense Initiative has been similarly hampered by being entangled in the US-Soviet strategic arms control process. The thesis concludes with a review of alternative approaches to the ABM Treaty regime.« less
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