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Title: Evaluation of treatment options for mercury/PCB contaminated soil

Abstract

The purpose of this project was to evaluate treatment alternatives for soil contaminated with mercury and polychlorinated biphenyl (PCB) aroclor 1268 at the LCP site, a former chlor-alkali plant, in Brunswick, GA. The site was operated as a petroleum refinery from 1919 to 1930. Based on past experience and a literature search, soil washing and thermal desorption were deemed to be the most promising technologies. A bulk soil sample was collected from the south process area and analyzed to have 190 mg/kg mercury and 405 mg/kg of PCB aroclor 1268. The soil was screened to {1/4} treatability tests. Testing was performed in three parts consisting of a round of geophysical and chemical analyses to determine matrix characteristics; thermal desorption tests at temperatures ranging from 100 C to 700 C to determine the volatility of mercury and PCB aroclor 1268; and a soil-washing study matrix to evaluate the effect of chemical additives such as acids, oxidizers, and surfactants to physically and chemically remove contaminants from the soil matrix.

Authors:
 [1];  [2];  [3]
  1. EPA/Environmental Response Team Center, Edison, NJ (United States)
  2. Roy F. Weston, Inc./REAC, Edison, NJ (United States)
  3. EPA/Region IV, Atlanta, GA (United States)
Publication Date:
OSTI Identifier:
488877
Report Number(s):
CONF-9610152-
TRN: IM9728%%68
Resource Type:
Conference
Resource Relation:
Conference: 17. Superfund hazardous waste conference, Washington, DC (United States), 15-17 Oct 1996; Other Information: PBD: 1996; Related Information: Is Part Of Hazwaste world, Superfund XVII: Conference proceedings; PB: 879 p.
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
54 ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCES; POLYCHLORINATED BIPHENYLS; MERCURY; REMEDIAL ACTION; SOILS; CHEMICAL INDUSTRY; TECHNOLOGY ASSESSMENT; GEORGIA; SITE CHARACTERIZATION; PETROLEUM REFINERIES; MONITORING

Citation Formats

Camacho, J.M., Tobia, R.J., and Peronard, P. Evaluation of treatment options for mercury/PCB contaminated soil. United States: N. p., 1996. Web.
Camacho, J.M., Tobia, R.J., & Peronard, P. Evaluation of treatment options for mercury/PCB contaminated soil. United States.
Camacho, J.M., Tobia, R.J., and Peronard, P. 1996. "Evaluation of treatment options for mercury/PCB contaminated soil". United States. doi:.
@article{osti_488877,
title = {Evaluation of treatment options for mercury/PCB contaminated soil},
author = {Camacho, J.M. and Tobia, R.J. and Peronard, P.},
abstractNote = {The purpose of this project was to evaluate treatment alternatives for soil contaminated with mercury and polychlorinated biphenyl (PCB) aroclor 1268 at the LCP site, a former chlor-alkali plant, in Brunswick, GA. The site was operated as a petroleum refinery from 1919 to 1930. Based on past experience and a literature search, soil washing and thermal desorption were deemed to be the most promising technologies. A bulk soil sample was collected from the south process area and analyzed to have 190 mg/kg mercury and 405 mg/kg of PCB aroclor 1268. The soil was screened to {1/4} treatability tests. Testing was performed in three parts consisting of a round of geophysical and chemical analyses to determine matrix characteristics; thermal desorption tests at temperatures ranging from 100 C to 700 C to determine the volatility of mercury and PCB aroclor 1268; and a soil-washing study matrix to evaluate the effect of chemical additives such as acids, oxidizers, and surfactants to physically and chemically remove contaminants from the soil matrix.},
doi = {},
journal = {},
number = ,
volume = ,
place = {United States},
year = 1996,
month =
}

Conference:
Other availability
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