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Title: Detection of leaks in underground storage tanks using electrical resistance methods: 1996 results

Abstract

This document provides a summary of a field experiment performed under a 15m diameter steel tank mockup located at the Hanford Reservation, Washington. The purpose of this test was to image a contaminant plume as it develops in soil under a tank already contaminated by previous leakage and to determine whether contaminant plumes can be detected without the benefit of background data. Measurements of electrical resistance were made before and during a salt water release. These measurements were made in soil which contained the remnants of salt water plumes released during previous tests in 1994 and in 1995. About 11,150 liters of saline solution were released along a portion of the tank`s edge in 1996. Changes in electrical resistivity due to release of salt water conducted in 1996 were determined in two ways: (1) changes relative to the 1996 pre-spill data, and (2) changes relative to data collected near the middle of the 1996 spill after the release flow rate was increased. In both cases, the observed resistivity changes show clearly defined anomalies caused by the salt water release. These results indicate that when a plume develops over an existing plume and in a geologic environment similar to the testmore » site environment, the resulting resistivity changes are easily detectable. Three dimensional tomographs of the resistivity of the soil under the tank show that the salt water release caused a region of low soil resistivity which can be observed directly without the benefit of comparing the tomograph to tomographs or data collected before the spill started. This means that it may be possible to infer the presence of pre-existing plumes if there is other data showing that the regions of low resistivity are correlated with the presence of contaminated soil. However, this approach does not appear reliable in defining the total extent of the plume due to the confounding effect that natural heterogeneity has on our ability to define the margins of the anomaly.« less

Authors:
;
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Lawrence Livermore National Lab., CA (United States)
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE, Washington, DC (United States)
OSTI Identifier:
479070
Report Number(s):
UCRL-ID-125918
ON: DE97051536; TRN: 97:010999
DOE Contract Number:  
W-7405-ENG-48
Resource Type:
Technical Report
Resource Relation:
Other Information: PBD: Oct 1996
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
05 NUCLEAR FUELS; HANFORD RESERVATION; RADIOACTIVE WASTE STORAGE; TANKS; LEAKS; DETECTION; SOILS; TOMOGRAPHY; UNDERGROUND STORAGE; ELECTRIC CONDUCTIVITY; PLUMES; EXPERIMENTAL DATA

Citation Formats

Ramirez, A, and Daily, W. Detection of leaks in underground storage tanks using electrical resistance methods: 1996 results. United States: N. p., 1996. Web. doi:10.2172/479070.
Ramirez, A, & Daily, W. Detection of leaks in underground storage tanks using electrical resistance methods: 1996 results. United States. doi:10.2172/479070.
Ramirez, A, and Daily, W. Tue . "Detection of leaks in underground storage tanks using electrical resistance methods: 1996 results". United States. doi:10.2172/479070. https://www.osti.gov/servlets/purl/479070.
@article{osti_479070,
title = {Detection of leaks in underground storage tanks using electrical resistance methods: 1996 results},
author = {Ramirez, A and Daily, W},
abstractNote = {This document provides a summary of a field experiment performed under a 15m diameter steel tank mockup located at the Hanford Reservation, Washington. The purpose of this test was to image a contaminant plume as it develops in soil under a tank already contaminated by previous leakage and to determine whether contaminant plumes can be detected without the benefit of background data. Measurements of electrical resistance were made before and during a salt water release. These measurements were made in soil which contained the remnants of salt water plumes released during previous tests in 1994 and in 1995. About 11,150 liters of saline solution were released along a portion of the tank`s edge in 1996. Changes in electrical resistivity due to release of salt water conducted in 1996 were determined in two ways: (1) changes relative to the 1996 pre-spill data, and (2) changes relative to data collected near the middle of the 1996 spill after the release flow rate was increased. In both cases, the observed resistivity changes show clearly defined anomalies caused by the salt water release. These results indicate that when a plume develops over an existing plume and in a geologic environment similar to the test site environment, the resulting resistivity changes are easily detectable. Three dimensional tomographs of the resistivity of the soil under the tank show that the salt water release caused a region of low soil resistivity which can be observed directly without the benefit of comparing the tomograph to tomographs or data collected before the spill started. This means that it may be possible to infer the presence of pre-existing plumes if there is other data showing that the regions of low resistivity are correlated with the presence of contaminated soil. However, this approach does not appear reliable in defining the total extent of the plume due to the confounding effect that natural heterogeneity has on our ability to define the margins of the anomaly.},
doi = {10.2172/479070},
journal = {},
number = ,
volume = ,
place = {United States},
year = {1996},
month = {10}
}