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Title: Meteorological annual report for 1995 at the Savannah River Site

Abstract

The Environmental Technology Section (ETS) of the Savannah River Technology Center (SRTC) collects, archives, and analyzes basic meteorological data supporting a variety of activities at SRS. These activities include the design, construction, and operation of nuclear and non-nuclear facilities, emergency response, environmental compliance, resource management, and environmental research. This report contains tabular and graphical summaries of data collected during 1995 for temperature, precipitation, relative humidity, wind, barometric pressure, and solar radiation. Most of these data were collected at the central Climatology Facility. Summaries of temperature and relative humidity were generated with data from the lowest level of measurement at the Central Climatology Site tower (13 feet above ground). (Relative humidity is calculated from measurements of dew-point temperature.) Wind speed summaries were generated with data from the second measurement level (58 feet above ground). Wind speed measurements from this level are believed to best represent open, well-exposed areas of the Site. Precipitation summaries were based on data from the Building 773-A site since quality control algorithms for the central Climatology Facility rain gauge data were not finalized at the time this report was prepared. This report also contains seasonal and annual summaries of joint occurrence frequencies for selected wind speed categoriesmore » by 22.5 degree wind direction sector (i.e., wind roses). Wind rose summaries are provided for the 200-foot level of the Central Climatology tower and for each of the eight 200-foot area towers.« less

Authors:
;
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Westinghouse Savannah River Co., Aiken, SC (United States)
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE, Washington, DC (United States)
OSTI Identifier:
468516
Report Number(s):
WSRC-TR-96-0309
ON: DE97004889; TRN: 97:010195
DOE Contract Number:
AC09-89SR18035
Resource Type:
Technical Report
Resource Relation:
Other Information: PBD: Dec 1996
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
54 ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCES; SAVANNAH RIVER PLANT; METEOROLOGY; TEMPERATURE MEASUREMENT; ATMOSPHERIC PRECIPITATIONS; HUMIDITY; WIND; ATMOSPHERIC PRESSURE; SOLAR RADIATION; COMPILED DATA; PROGRESS REPORT

Citation Formats

Hunter, C.H., and Tatum, C.P. Meteorological annual report for 1995 at the Savannah River Site. United States: N. p., 1996. Web. doi:10.2172/468516.
Hunter, C.H., & Tatum, C.P. Meteorological annual report for 1995 at the Savannah River Site. United States. doi:10.2172/468516.
Hunter, C.H., and Tatum, C.P. 1996. "Meteorological annual report for 1995 at the Savannah River Site". United States. doi:10.2172/468516. https://www.osti.gov/servlets/purl/468516.
@article{osti_468516,
title = {Meteorological annual report for 1995 at the Savannah River Site},
author = {Hunter, C.H. and Tatum, C.P.},
abstractNote = {The Environmental Technology Section (ETS) of the Savannah River Technology Center (SRTC) collects, archives, and analyzes basic meteorological data supporting a variety of activities at SRS. These activities include the design, construction, and operation of nuclear and non-nuclear facilities, emergency response, environmental compliance, resource management, and environmental research. This report contains tabular and graphical summaries of data collected during 1995 for temperature, precipitation, relative humidity, wind, barometric pressure, and solar radiation. Most of these data were collected at the central Climatology Facility. Summaries of temperature and relative humidity were generated with data from the lowest level of measurement at the Central Climatology Site tower (13 feet above ground). (Relative humidity is calculated from measurements of dew-point temperature.) Wind speed summaries were generated with data from the second measurement level (58 feet above ground). Wind speed measurements from this level are believed to best represent open, well-exposed areas of the Site. Precipitation summaries were based on data from the Building 773-A site since quality control algorithms for the central Climatology Facility rain gauge data were not finalized at the time this report was prepared. This report also contains seasonal and annual summaries of joint occurrence frequencies for selected wind speed categories by 22.5 degree wind direction sector (i.e., wind roses). Wind rose summaries are provided for the 200-foot level of the Central Climatology tower and for each of the eight 200-foot area towers.},
doi = {10.2172/468516},
journal = {},
number = ,
volume = ,
place = {United States},
year = 1996,
month =
}

Technical Report:

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  • The Savannah River Ecology Laboratory initiated ecological studies related to the construction of the DWPF on the SRS in FY-1979. Two areas have been used for biological surveys and long-term monitoring: the DWPF construction site (S-Area and Z-Area), and two control sites (Rainbow Bay and Tinker Creek). The Rainbow Bay study area and S-Area are located within 5 km of each other on the SRS, and both once contained Carolina bays which were very similar ecologically. One goal of the SREL`s faunal studies is to compare the natural variation in amphibian populations at the Rainbow Bay control site to themore » variation observed at the human-altered site (Sun Bay, formerly on the DWPF construction site). Pre-construction biological surveys included data on vegetation, birds, mammals, amphibians, reptiles, fish and several invertebrate groups. No species on the Federal Endangered or Threatened lists were found on either site, but several plants and animals of threatened or special-concern status in South Carolina were present and the gopher frog (Rana areolata) currently is being considered for federal listing. Continuing studies are directed towards assessing construction impacts on the biota and towares modeling the effects of alteration of wetland hydroperiod on the biota. Primary emphasis is being paced on evaluation the effectiveness of mitigation measures undertaken by DOE.« less
  • The fundamental objective of this project is to develop and field test the mixed microbial mat bioremediation system for decontamination of target sites at SRS. Although microbial mats have performed well in several pilot projects in the past, atypical problems and site characteristics at SRS demand special field designs. In the interest of designing a pilot and locating it at an appropriate site, the project investigators have worked closely with the technical staff at the SREL. We have concluded that the diverse characteristics of contaminations at SRS may dictate testing several pilot designs during the course of this project.
  • During its nine day existence, Hurricane Hugo tracked thousands of miles, caused millions of dollars in property damage, and took many lives. Puerto Rico, Guadeloupe, the Virgin Islands, and South Carolina took the brunt of the storm. The staff of meteorologists of the Environmental Technology Section (ETS) provided briefings and forecasts to assist Savannah River Site management in developing appropriate site-wide protective action plans. Loops'' created from infrared satellite imagery provided the most useful forecasting tool. Single-site, composite radar imagery and wind measurements from the nine 200 m towers provided real-time monitoring of the effects of Hugo at SRS. Amore » peak wind gust of 64.9 mph and up to 5.05 inches of precipitation were recorded at SRS. An assessment of the potential for wind damage to selected SRS facilities, had Hugo passed over SRS, showed that little structural damage would have occurred with proper pre-storm preparation.« less
  • Radiological dose to the offsite maximum individual or the 50-mile population is often estimated assuming that operational atmospheric releases originate from the geographical center of the Savannah River Site. Historically, meteorological data collected from instrumentation on the H-Area tower have been utilized to estimate atmospheric dispersion from centrally located releases.'' This paper examines the effect on dose predictions using meteorological data from seven onsite towers located at A, C, D, F, H, K, and P areas to describe meteorological conditions at the central release location. Maximum individual dose estimates using both annual and short-term average air concentrations are well withinmore » 20% of the mean prediction. Population dose estimates are also within 20% of the mean prediction. Population dose estimates are also within 20% of the mean except for two-hour doses using H-Area meteorological data, which is less than the average estimate by about 30%.« less
  • A five-year meteorological database from the 61-meter, H-Area tower for the period 1987--1991 was compared to an earlier database for the period 1982--1986. The amount of invalid data for the newer 87--91 database was one third that for the earlier database. The data recovery percentage for the last four years of the 87-91 database was well above 90%. Considerable effort was necessary to fill in for missing data periods for the newer database for the H-Area tower. Therefore, additional databases that have been prepared for the remaining SRS meteorological towers have had missing and erroneous data flagged, but not replaced.more » The F-Area tower`s database was used for cross-comparison purposes because of its proximity to H Area. The primary purpose of this report is to compare the H-Tower databases for 82-86 and 87-91. Statistical methods enable the use of probability statements to be made concerning the hypothesis of no differences between the distributions of the two time periods, assuming each database is a random sample from its respective distribution. This assumption is required for the statistical tests to be valid. A number of statistical comparisons can be made between the two data sets, even though the 82-86 database exist only as distributions of frequency and mean speed.« less