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Title: Soil moisture effects during bioventing in fuel-contaminated arid soils

Abstract

This study evaluated the effects of soil moisture addition on microbial activity during bioventing of dry, sandy soils at the Marine Corps Air Ground Combat Center (MCAGCC), Twentynine Palms, California. Soils at the site have been contaminated to a depth of approximately 80 ft (24 m) with gasoline, JP-5 jet fuel, and diesel fuel. Based on the low soil moisture measured at the site (2 to 3% by weight), it was determined that soil moisture may be limiting biodegradation. To evaluate the effect that moisture addition had on microbial activity under field conditions, a subsurface drip irrigation system was installed above the fuel hydrocarbon plume. Irrigation water was obtained from two monitoring wells on the site, where groundwater was approximately 192 ft (59 m) below ground surface. Advancement of the wetting front was monitored. In situ respiration rates increased significantly after moisture addition. The results of this study provide evidence for the potential applicability of moisture addition in conjunction with bioventing for site remediation in arid environments. Further work is planned to investigate optimization of moisture addition.

Authors:
; ;  [1];  [2];  [3]
  1. Battelle Columbus, OH (United States)
  2. Naval Facilities Engineering Service Center, Port Hueneme, CA (United States)
  3. Marine Corps, Twentynine Palms, CA (United States). National Resources/Environmental Affairs Div.
Publication Date:
OSTI Identifier:
467751
Report Number(s):
CONF-950483-
ISBN 1-57477-003-9; TRN: 97:008335
Resource Type:
Conference
Resource Relation:
Conference: 3. international in situ and on-site bioreclamation symposium, San Diego, CA (United States), 24-27 Apr 1995; Other Information: PBD: 1995; Related Information: Is Part Of In situ aeration: Air sparging, bioventing, and related remediation process; Hinchee, R.E. [ed.] [Battelle Memorial Inst., Columbus, OH (United States)]; Miller, R.N. [ed.] [Air Force Center for Environmental Excellence, Brooks AFB, TX (United States)]; Johnson, P.C. [ed.] [Arizona State Univ., Tempe, AZ (United States)]; PB: 630 p.; Bioremediation, Volume 3(2)
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
02 PETROLEUM; BIODEGRADATION; REMEDIAL ACTION; HYDROCARBONS; OIL SPILLS; IN-SITU PROCESSING; MILITARY FACILITIES; CALIFORNIA; JET ENGINE FUELS; DIESEL FUELS; GASOLINE; ARID LANDS

Citation Formats

Zwick, T.C., Leeson, A., Hinchee, R.E., Hoeppel, R.E., and Bowling, L. Soil moisture effects during bioventing in fuel-contaminated arid soils. United States: N. p., 1995. Web.
Zwick, T.C., Leeson, A., Hinchee, R.E., Hoeppel, R.E., & Bowling, L. Soil moisture effects during bioventing in fuel-contaminated arid soils. United States.
Zwick, T.C., Leeson, A., Hinchee, R.E., Hoeppel, R.E., and Bowling, L. Sun . "Soil moisture effects during bioventing in fuel-contaminated arid soils". United States. doi:.
@article{osti_467751,
title = {Soil moisture effects during bioventing in fuel-contaminated arid soils},
author = {Zwick, T.C. and Leeson, A. and Hinchee, R.E. and Hoeppel, R.E. and Bowling, L.},
abstractNote = {This study evaluated the effects of soil moisture addition on microbial activity during bioventing of dry, sandy soils at the Marine Corps Air Ground Combat Center (MCAGCC), Twentynine Palms, California. Soils at the site have been contaminated to a depth of approximately 80 ft (24 m) with gasoline, JP-5 jet fuel, and diesel fuel. Based on the low soil moisture measured at the site (2 to 3% by weight), it was determined that soil moisture may be limiting biodegradation. To evaluate the effect that moisture addition had on microbial activity under field conditions, a subsurface drip irrigation system was installed above the fuel hydrocarbon plume. Irrigation water was obtained from two monitoring wells on the site, where groundwater was approximately 192 ft (59 m) below ground surface. Advancement of the wetting front was monitored. In situ respiration rates increased significantly after moisture addition. The results of this study provide evidence for the potential applicability of moisture addition in conjunction with bioventing for site remediation in arid environments. Further work is planned to investigate optimization of moisture addition.},
doi = {},
journal = {},
number = ,
volume = ,
place = {United States},
year = {Sun Dec 31 00:00:00 EST 1995},
month = {Sun Dec 31 00:00:00 EST 1995}
}

Conference:
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  • To determine the feasibility and effectiveness of in situ bioventing, careful monitoring of soil gas chemistry is essential. Prior to design of a bioventing system, initial soil gas surveys should be performed. Concentrations of three constituents, oxygen (O{sub 2}), carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}), and total volatile hydrocarbons (TVH), are used in bioventing design. TVH are an indicator of contaminant distribution; O{sub 2} and CO{sub 2} are indicators of biodegradation activity. Analysis of soil gas data collected during pilot-scale testing is the primary design basis for full-scale remediation systems. Biodegradation rates determined from respiration tests are used to estimate the lengthmore » of time that a system will have to operate to remediate the contamination. Air permeability of the soil, calculated from permeability testing, determines the number and spacing of air injection wells that will be required to ensure adequate oxygen influence through the entire contaminated area.« less
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