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Title: APSTNG: Associated particle sealed-tube neutron generator studies for arms control. Final report on NN-20 Project ST220

Abstract

Argonne National Laboratory has performed research and development on the use of Associated Particle Sealed-Tube Neutron Generator (APSTNG) technology for treaty verification and non-proliferation applications, under funding from the DOE Office of Nonproliferation and National Security. Results indicate that this technology has significant potential for nondestructively detecting elemental compositions inside inspected objects or volumes. The final phase of this project was placement of an order for commercial procurement of an advanced sealed tube, with its high-voltage supply and control systems. Procurement specifications reflected lessons learned during the study. The APSTNG interrogates a volume with a continuous 14-MeV neutron flux. Each neutron is emitted coincident with an {open_quotes}associated{close_quotes} alpha-particle emitted in the opposite direction. Thus detection of an alpha-particle marks the emission of a neutron in a cone opposite to that defined by the alpha detector. Detection of a gamma ray coincident with the alpha indicates that the gamma was emitted from a neutron-induced reaction inside the neutron cone: the gamma spectra can be used to identify fissionable materials and many isotopes having an atomic number larger than that of boron. The differences in gamma-ray and alpha-particle detection times yield a coarse measurement of the distance along the cone axis frommore » the APSTNG emitter to each region containing the identified nuclide. A position-sensitive alpha detector would permit construction of coarse three-dimensional images. The source and emission-detection systems can be located on the same side of the interrogated volume. The neutrons and gamma rays are highly penetrating. A relatively high signal-to-background ratio allows the use of a relatively small neutron source and conventional electronics.« less

Authors:
; ; ; ;
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Argonne National Lab., IL (United States)
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE, Washington, DC (United States)
OSTI Identifier:
45611
Report Number(s):
ANL/ACTV-95/1
ON: DE95009651; TRN: 95:003687
DOE Contract Number:  
W-31109-ENG-38
Resource Type:
Technical Report
Resource Relation:
Other Information: PBD: Dec 1994
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
35 ARMS CONTROL; 44 INSTRUMENTATION, INCLUDING NUCLEAR AND PARTICLE DETECTORS; ARMS CONTROL; TECHNOLOGY ASSESSMENT; NUCLEAR WEAPONS DISMANTLEMENT; SAFEGUARDS; MONITORING; NON-PROLIFERATION TREATY; NUCLEAR MATERIALS DIVERSION

Citation Formats

Rhodes, E., Dickerman, C. E., Brunner, T., Hess, A., and Tylinski, S. APSTNG: Associated particle sealed-tube neutron generator studies for arms control. Final report on NN-20 Project ST220. United States: N. p., 1994. Web. doi:10.2172/45611.
Rhodes, E., Dickerman, C. E., Brunner, T., Hess, A., & Tylinski, S. APSTNG: Associated particle sealed-tube neutron generator studies for arms control. Final report on NN-20 Project ST220. United States. doi:10.2172/45611.
Rhodes, E., Dickerman, C. E., Brunner, T., Hess, A., and Tylinski, S. Thu . "APSTNG: Associated particle sealed-tube neutron generator studies for arms control. Final report on NN-20 Project ST220". United States. doi:10.2172/45611. https://www.osti.gov/servlets/purl/45611.
@article{osti_45611,
title = {APSTNG: Associated particle sealed-tube neutron generator studies for arms control. Final report on NN-20 Project ST220},
author = {Rhodes, E. and Dickerman, C. E. and Brunner, T. and Hess, A. and Tylinski, S.},
abstractNote = {Argonne National Laboratory has performed research and development on the use of Associated Particle Sealed-Tube Neutron Generator (APSTNG) technology for treaty verification and non-proliferation applications, under funding from the DOE Office of Nonproliferation and National Security. Results indicate that this technology has significant potential for nondestructively detecting elemental compositions inside inspected objects or volumes. The final phase of this project was placement of an order for commercial procurement of an advanced sealed tube, with its high-voltage supply and control systems. Procurement specifications reflected lessons learned during the study. The APSTNG interrogates a volume with a continuous 14-MeV neutron flux. Each neutron is emitted coincident with an {open_quotes}associated{close_quotes} alpha-particle emitted in the opposite direction. Thus detection of an alpha-particle marks the emission of a neutron in a cone opposite to that defined by the alpha detector. Detection of a gamma ray coincident with the alpha indicates that the gamma was emitted from a neutron-induced reaction inside the neutron cone: the gamma spectra can be used to identify fissionable materials and many isotopes having an atomic number larger than that of boron. The differences in gamma-ray and alpha-particle detection times yield a coarse measurement of the distance along the cone axis from the APSTNG emitter to each region containing the identified nuclide. A position-sensitive alpha detector would permit construction of coarse three-dimensional images. The source and emission-detection systems can be located on the same side of the interrogated volume. The neutrons and gamma rays are highly penetrating. A relatively high signal-to-background ratio allows the use of a relatively small neutron source and conventional electronics.},
doi = {10.2172/45611},
journal = {},
number = ,
volume = ,
place = {United States},
year = {1994},
month = {12}
}